World: 'Zombie raccoon' sightings: They stagger, show their teeth and may have glowing eyes - PressFrom - Australia
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World'Zombie raccoon' sightings: They stagger, show their teeth and may have glowing eyes

12:15  16 may  2019
12:15  16 may  2019 Source:   usatoday.com

Chicago Area Police Are Warning Pet Owners About ‘Zombie Raccoons’

Chicago Area Police Are Warning Pet Owners About ‘Zombie Raccoons’ "Zombie raccoons" have a disease that causes them to walk upright, stagger, and bare their teeth—and they pose a threat to pets.

Showing their teeth . Having " glowing ” eyes . The eyes of diseased raccoons can appear to glow and have an "eery greenish" tint because of abnormal mineral deposits associated with the disease, the city says.

Specifically, they say, the raccoons stand on their hind legs, bear their teeth , and then topple over to the ground where they lay motionless for a while before One wildlife photographer who witnessed the weird antics of the animals said he's never a raccoon in such an "extremely strange" way.

'Zombie raccoon' sightings: They stagger, show their teeth and may have glowing eyes© Provided by USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, Inc. Police in Milton, West Virginia, responded to a pair of calls this week about suspected rabid raccoons. Turns out the animals were just "drunk" off crab apples, police said.

The distemper virus can make raccoons act like zombies and can be deadly to dogs. Chicago-area officials have repeatedly warned locals that cases have been spotted in the region.

Police have received multiple reports of “zombie raccoons” recently, and the diseased animals are a persistent problem near Chicago according to reports by the Chicago Tribune and ABC7 Chicago.

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Raccoons exist in this weird pocket of the animal kingdom comprised of adorable animals that look cute but The animals were coming out during the day and standing on their back legs, bearing their teeth and Ohio police have received over a dozen reports of similar sightings of these zombie -like

Return of the zombie raccoon : Chicago dog owners are warned after a spate of sightings of Zombie -like raccoons are roaming around the west Chicago suburb of Riverside Staggering , snarling and slowness are some of the affected animals' symptoms

In December, Cook County Animal and Rabies Control warned residents of an increase in raccoons carrying the virus and displaying "abnormal neurologic signs." Pet owners should vaccinate their dogs against the disease, the warning says.

After reports of distemper in Ohio raccoons made headlines last year, local authorities addressed the common description of the diseased animals:

"'Zombie raccoons' have been making the news lately, and residents are asking what that means. Sadly, the nickname refers to raccoons that may appear zombie-like due to a viral disease called distemper," a post from the city of Dublin, Ohio, reads.

The city said symptoms of distemper in raccoons include:

  • Walking around dazed and confused, and/or approaching people or pets
  • Staggering or falling down when walking
  • Showing their teeth
  • Having "glowing” eyes

The eyes of diseased raccoons can appear to glow and have an "eery greenish" tint because of abnormal mineral deposits associated with the disease, the city says.

While humans cannot catch distemper, they can accidentally transfer it to their dogs, a fact sheet from a Canadian Humane Society says. The disease is highly contagious and can spread through a variety of methods, including inhalation and contact with raccoon feces.

The disease is separate from chronic wasting disease – unofficially dubbed "zombie" deer disease – which drew headlines in its spread to dozens of states this year.

Modern humans split from Neanderthals far earlier than thought: study.
Scientists seeking to unlock the mysteries of human evolution have in recent years relied on increasingly sophisticated DNA techniques that provide "molecular clocks" to date the remains of our ancient ancestors. But a new analysis that instead examines fossil teeth provides an alternative approach -- and one which yields a significantly earlier date for the divergence between modern humans and Neanderthals. The study by Aida Gomez-Robles from University College London proposes that the two species' last common ancestor may have lived 800,000 years ago, entering a debate that is hotly contested among anthropologists.

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