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WorldBoeing "fell short" on 737 Max alert

01:45  31 may  2019
01:45  31 may  2019 Source:   bbc.com

French widow sues Boeing for at least $276 million over Ethiopian crash

French widow sues Boeing for at least $276 million over Ethiopian crash A French woman whose husband died in the crash of a Boeing 737 MAX airliner in Ethiopia has filed a U.S. lawsuit against the planemaker, seeking at least $276 million in damages. The crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 in March killed all 157 passengers and crew aboard and followed the death in October of 189 people on a Lion Air 737 MAX which plunged into the ocean off Indonesia in similar circumstances. Dozens of families have sued Boeing over the Lion Air crash, and several lawsuits have been lodged over the Ethiopian crash near the capital Addis Ababa, which led airlines around the world to ground the Boeing 737 MAX.

Boeing has admitted it " fell short " when it failed to implement a safety alert system on the 737 Max . The aircraft was grounded globally in March after two crashes within months. Boeing boss Dennis Muilenburg said a mistake had been made in the software for a cockpit warning light called an

Boeing admits it ' fell short ' on safety alert for 737 . Image caption Boeing 's 737 Max aircraft was grounded in March. Airline trade body, the International Air Transport Association (Iata) is meeting in South Korea for its biggest gathering since the two disasters.

Boeing "fell short" on 737 Max alert© Reuters The Ethiopian Airlines crash killed all 157 on board Boeing has admitted it "fell short" when it failed to implement a safety alert system on the 737 Max.

The aircraft was grounded globally in March after two crashes within months.

Boeing "fell short" on 737 Max alert
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Boeing boss Dennis Muilenburg said a mistake had been made in the software for a cockpit warning light called an "angle-of-attack (AOA) disagree alert".

He said: "We clearly fell short and the implementation of this angle-of-attack disagree alert was a mistake, right, we did not implement it properly."

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The head of Boeing acknowledged Wednesday that the company "clearly fell short " in dealing with the accident-ridden 737 MAX and said that it had not adequately communicated with regulators. "The implementation of this angle of attack alert was a mistake," he told CBS.

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In an interview with Norah O'Donnell of CBS News he said Boeing was now fixing the problem.

The alert could have notified pilots and maintenance crews that there was a problem early in the flight.

One flight safety expert said if there had of been an AOA disagree alert on board the Ethiopian airlines flight it "would have been the very first clue" for the pilots that something was wrong.

Chris Brady, a pilot and author of The Boeing 737 Technical Guide said: "I'm fairly confident that the Ethiopian Airlines flight probably would not have crashed if they had had the AOA disagree alert" on the aircraft.

Erroneous reading

Ethiopian Airlines flight ET 302 crashed after an erroneous reading from one of the AOA sensors triggered a flight control system (MCAS) which repeatedly pushed the nose of the aircraft down.

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The head of Boeing acknowledged Wednesday that the company "clearly fell short " in dealing with the accident-ridden 737 Max and said that it had not adequately communicated with regulators. "The implementation of this angle of attack alert was a mistake," he told CBS.

'We clearly fell short and the implementation of this angle-of-attack disagree alert was a mistake, right, we did not implement it properly. Boeing has cut it production schedule of the 737 MAX and halted new deliveries, necessitating additional storage capacity in Washington and Texas, he said.

All 157 people on board were killed.

Mr Brady believes that if there had been an alert warning light showing that the AOA sensors were giving different readings, then the pilots might have followed an emergency procedure at an earlier point in the doomed flight.

The procedure, detailed by Boeing in a bulletin to airlines and pilots in November subsequent to the Lion Air crash off Indonesia, involves flipping two switches, and turns-off an automatic control system for the plane's stabilisers.

Boeing said in a statement a month ago that the "alert has not been considered a safety feature on airplanes and is not necessary for the safe operation of the airplane."

Mr Muilenburg also admitted in the CBS interview that the company knew that the alert system was not active on all 737 Max jets in 2017 and yet did not tell the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for 13 months.

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The head of Boeing acknowledged on Thursday that the company "clearly fell short " in dealing with the accident-ridden 737 A note from CFRA Research characterized the timeframe for the 737 MAX resumption as "worse" than expected, but said Boeing was still well positioned once it exits the crisis.

Aviation officials in March grounded the Boeing 737 Max jets around the world after a second fatal crash of the popular aircraft within five months. "We fell short in the implementation of the AoA disagree alert and are taking steps to address these issues so they do not occur again."

He said: "Our communication on that was not what it should have been."

And he issued another apology, saying "it feels personal".

He said that the crashes have had "the biggest impact on me" of anything in his 34 years at the planemaker.

Return to service

The head of the airline industry's trade body, IATA has said the 737 Max is unlikely to re-enter service before August.

Director General Alexandre de Juniac said "we do not expect something before 10 or 12 weeks", although he added a final decision was up to regulators.

Mr de Juniac told reporters in Seoul on Wednesday that IATA was organising a summit with airlines, regulators and Boeing in five-to-seven weeks to discuss what is needed for the 737 Max to return to service, he said.

He hoped that regulators can "align their timeframe" on when the aircraft will be back in the skies.

US operators United Airlines, Southwest Airlines, and American Airlines have removed the 737 Max from their flight schedules until early to mid-August.

Earlier in the day, Mr Muilenburg had told shareholders Boeing aimed to ramp-up its long-term production rate of the 737 Max to 57 a month after cutting monthly output to 42 planes in response to the groundings.

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