World: 'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe - PressFrom - Australia
  •   
  •   

World'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe

09:50  12 september  2019
09:50  12 september  2019 Source:   msn.com

Rebel Wilson To Host Australian Reality Competition Format ‘Pooch Perfect’

Rebel Wilson To Host Australian Reality Competition Format ‘Pooch Perfect’ Rebel Wilson is to host a pet-themed Australian reality competition series. 

Two Saudi women and two young girls wearing abayas . Saudi women have mounted a rare protest against the abaya , posting pictures on social media wearing the obligatory body-shrouding robe inside out.

Saudi women have mounted a rare protest against the abaya , posting pictures on social media wearing the obligatory body-shrouding robe inside out. Powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in March said wearing the robe was not mandatory in Islam

Her high heels clacking on marble tiles, a defiant Saudi woman turned heads and drew gasps as she strutted through a Riyadh mall -- without a body-shrouding abaya.

The billowy over-garment, usually all-black, is customary public wear for women in the ultra-conservative Islamic kingdom, where it is widely seen as a symbol of piety.

Last year, de facto ruler Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman hinted during an interview with CBS that the dress code may be relaxed, saying the robe was not mandatory in Islam.

'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe © FAYEZ NURELDINE Mashael al-Jaloud, 33, has stopped wearing the all-covering abaya except at work

But despite his sweeping liberalisation drive, the practice continued as no formal edict followed.

Audio of Jamal Khashoggi's gruesome murder revealed

Audio of Jamal Khashoggi's gruesome murder revealed Turkish newspaper publishes detailed transcript of Saudi hit squad in the final moments of journalist's assassination.

First such comment by senior religious figure comes amid liberalisation drive spearheaded by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Young woman arrested in Saudi Arabia for wearing 'suggestive clothing' - Продолжительность: 1:49 Washington Post 873 118 просмотров. Saudi Cleric Says Women Can Drive And Uncover Their Face - Продолжительность: 1:19 AJ+ 47 038 просмотров.

Some women subsequently mounted a rare social media protest against the restriction, posting pictures of themselves wearing the figure-concealing garment inside out.

Despite the risk of provoking arch-conservatives, many others now leave their cloaks open in the front or wear them in bright colours.

Mashael al-Jaloud has taken the cultural rebellion a step further -- she stopped wearing the robe.

In a stunning sight, the 33-year-old human resources specialist strolled through a mall in central Riyadh last week wearing nothing but a burnt orange top over baggy trousers.

In the crowd, there were audible gasps and arched eyebrows. Women veiled head-to-toe stared askance. Some mistook her for a celebrity.

"Are you famous?" asked a woman who sidled up to her.

Mr World pageant's Jony Berry unable to wear Aboriginal flag on costume upon competition stage

Mr World pageant's Jony Berry unable to wear Aboriginal flag on costume upon competition stage Jony Berry is a proud Indigenous man, but when he represented Australia at an international modelling competition he was asked to remove the Aboriginal flag from his costume.

Saudi women should have choice whether to wear abaya robe : crown prince STAR2SUN Please Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Z1kr_3pPV2A SUBSCRIBE STAR 2 SUN

The abaya "cloak", sometimes also called an aba, is a simple, loose over-garment, essentially a robe -like dress, worn by some women in parts of the Muslim world including in North Africa and the

"Are you a model?"

Jaloud laughed and said she was a normal Saudi woman.

'I just want to live'

'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe © FAYEZ NURELDINE Saudi activist Manahel al-Otaibi, 25, has been living in Riyadh without wearing the abaya for four months Jaloud is one of only a handful of women who have abandoned the abaya in recent months.

But the trend underscores a bold push for social liberties by young Saudis that may outstrip the monarchy's capacity for change.

Manahel al-Otaibi, a 25-year-old activist, has also foregone the garment.

"For four months I have been living in Riyadh without an abaya," said Otaibi, walking along Tahlia street, a restaurant-lined thoroughfare, in casual overalls.

"I just want to live the way I want, freely and without restrictions. No one should force me to wear something I don't want."

The abaya, which has existed for thousands of years but only became obligatory in recent decades, is also mandatory for non-Muslim women in the kingdom.

U.S. declassifies key name in Saudi-9/11 suit, but won't release it publicly

U.S. declassifies key name in Saudi-9/11 suit, but won't release it publicly The Trump administration decided Thursday to declassify a key name long sought by relatives of 9/11 victims who are suing Saudi Arabia over allegations of that country's involvement, but declined to release the name publicly. The name of the individual, which the 9/11 families believe may support their allegation of Saudi involvement in the terror attacks, will be disclosed to the plaintiff's lawyers under a protective order. The order makes it illegal for those attorneys to release the name to the public, meaning the identity of the individual will remain a secret — at least for now.

Saudi women have mounted a rare protest against the abaya , posting pictures on social media wearing the obligatory body-shrouding robe inside out. The conservative petro-state has some of the world's toughest restrictions on women

Saudi women have mounted a rare protest against the abaya , posting pictures on social media wearing the obligatory body-shrouding robe inside Powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in March said wearing the robe was not mandatory in Islam, but in practice nothing changed and no

The dress code was once fanatically enforced by the now-neutered religious police, and uncovered women still face random harassment in a conservative nation where attire is often associated with chastity.

"There are no clear laws, no protection. I might be at risk, might be subjected to assault from religious fanatics because I am without an abaya," Jaloud said.

In July, she posted a video on Twitter revealing that another Riyadh mall had stopped her from entering without an abaya.

She said she had tried unsuccessfully to persuade its guards by playing Prince Mohammed's television interview, in which he said women were only expected to wear "decent, respectful clothing" -- not necessarily an abaya.

In response to her post, the mall tweeted that it would not permit entry to "violators of public morals".

A Saudi royal also condemned her on Twitter, calling her a publicity seeker and demanding that she be punished for the "provocative" act.

Jaloud said she recently faced similar hostility at a Riyadh supermarket, where a fully veiled woman threatened to call the police.

Global spare oil capacity in U.S. hands after Saudi outage

Global spare oil capacity in U.S. hands after Saudi outage Global spare oil capacity in U.S. hands after Saudi outage

Image caption Saudi women have to wear the abaya by law where they might be seen by a man who is not a relative. Saudi women are currently required to wear the garment by law. The cleric's intervention comes amid moves to modernise Saudi society and relax restriction on women .

Women should not be obliged to cover up in public with long garments, senior religious figure says. A senior religious scholar in Saudi Arabia has said women should not have to wear the loose-fitting abaya robe to cover up their bodies in public.

'Not linked to religion'

'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe © - Saudi Arabia's easing of travel restrictions on women earlier this year was hailed as a historic leap for gender equality, but it also drew anger from hardliners backing male "guardianship" rules Jaloud remains defiant, but she is still forced to wear an abaya and headscarf to work, or risk losing her job.

In a regulation that seems to be arbitrarily enforced, the Saudi labour ministry says on its website that working women are expected to be "modest, well-covered" and should not wear anything "transparent".

Prince Mohammed has sought to shake off his country's ultra-conservative image by allowing cinemas, mixed-gender concerts and greater freedoms for women, including the right to drive.

As part of the liberalisation, the kingdom has invited a host of international musicians to perform, such as rapper Nicki Minaj, well known for her skin-baring music videos.

"(Minaj) is going to shake her backside and all her songs are about sex... and then everyone tells me to wear the abaya," a young Saudi woman fumed in a recent online video that went viral.

"What the hell!"

Minaj eventually cancelled her visit, citing the kingdom's poor human rights record.

But the sentiment encapsulates the tussle between a mostly young population clamouring for greater freedoms and hardliners alarmed by the pace of reforms they see as un-Islamic.

Oil could rise $10 per barrel after drone attack reportedly forces Saudi to cut output in half

Oil could rise $10 per barrel after drone attack reportedly forces Saudi to cut output in half Oil prices are expected to jump as much as $10 per barrel after a coordinated drone strike hit Saudi Arabia's largest oil field, reportedly forcing the kingdom to cut its oil output in half. Ten drones attacked an oil processing facility at Abqaiq and the nearby Khurais oil field on Saturday, reportedly causing a loss of almost five million barrels of crude production a day or about 5% of the world's daily oil production. Although it's still too early to tell the extent of the damage and how long the facilities will be shut down, oil analysts and traders told CNBC the impact on the commodity's price could be double digit.

Women in Saudi Arabia need not wear headcover or the black abaya - the loose-fitting, full-length robes symbolic of Islamic piety - as long as their attire is "decent and respectful", the FILE PHOTO: Saudi Arabian women , seeking a job, talk with recruiters during a job fair in Riyadh January 25, 2012.

Women in Saudi Arabia need not wear headcover or the black abaya - the loose-fitting, full-length robes symbolic of Islamic piety - as long "This, however, does not particularly specify a black abaya or a black head cover. The decision is entirely left for women to decide what type of decent and

But Jaloud argued that the abaya is "not linked to religion".

"If it was, Saudi women wouldn't take them off when they go outside the kingdom," she said.

In pictures: 10 most dangerous countries to be a woman

'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe
'Rebel' Saudi women shun obligatory abaya robe

Trump: US 'locked and loaded' against attackers of Saudi oil facility 'depending on verification'.
President Trump on Sunday authorized the use of emergency oil reserves in Texas and other states after Saudi oil processing facilities were attacked, sparking fears of a spike in oil prices when markets reopen on Monday. Read more

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 229
This is interesting!