World: Wealthy couple gets prison terms for U.S. college admissions scam - PressFrom - Australia
  •   
  •   

World Wealthy couple gets prison terms for U.S. college admissions scam

07:10  09 october  2019
07:10  09 october  2019 Source:   reuters.com

Vegan activists make protest admissions

  Vegan activists make protest admissions Vegan activists have avoided criminal convictions for conducting a protest that shut down a major Melbourne intersection causing peak hour chaos.Dozens of vegan activists have avoided criminal convictions over a protest which shut down parts of central Melbourne.

The couple ’ s sentence by U . S . District Judge Indira Talwani also includes a requirement that they each pay a ,000 fine. The Abbotts are among 52 people charged with participating in a vast scheme in which wealthy parents conspired with a California college admissions consultant to use bribery and

In a major college admissions scandal that laid bare the elaborate lengths some wealthy parents will go to get their children into competitive A version of this article appears in print on , Section A, Page 1 of the New York edition with the headline: U . S . Charges Rich Parents in College Entry Fraud.

a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: FILE PHOTO: Marcia and Gregory Abbott leaves the federal courthouse in Boston© Reuters/Brian Snyder FILE PHOTO: Marcia and Gregory Abbott leaves the federal courthouse in Boston

The founder of a food and beverage packaging company and his wife were each sentenced to one month in prison on Tuesday for their roles in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam uncovered in the United States.

Gregory and Marcia Abbott received lighter sentences than the eight-month terms sought by federal prosecutors in Boston after they admitted to paying $125,000 to have a corrupt test proctor secretly correct their daughter's answers on college entrance exams.

The couple's sentence by U.S. District Judge Indira Talwani also includes a requirement that they each pay a $45,000 fine. They previously pleaded guilty in May to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

U.S. judge rejects claim Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants

  U.S. judge rejects claim Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants U.S. judge rejects claim Harvard discriminates against Asian-American applicants , a federal judge ruled on Tuesday, rejecting a lawsuit brought by opponents of affirmative action and backed by the Trump administration.The lawsuit was brought by a group hoping to eventually overturn U.S. Supreme Court precedents that allow colleges to consider race as one factor in admissions, so long as quotas are not involved. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

The 2019 college admissions bribery scandal arose over a criminal conspiracy to influence undergraduate admissions decisions at several top American universities.

The latest: LA exec gets 4 months in prison for paying 0K to get son into Georgetown as a fake tennis recruit. Talwani sentenced two parents who "I'm also sorry to all the other kids out there who are in the college admissions process and their parents who are helping them and supporting them

Lawyers for the Abbotts did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Abbotts are among 52 people charged with participating in a vast scheme in which wealthy parents conspired with a California college admissions consultant to use bribery and other forms of fraud to secure the admission of their children to top schools.

William "Rick" Singer, the consultant, pleaded guilty in March to charges that he facilitated cheating on college entrance exams and helped bribe sports coaches at universities to present his clients’ children as fake athletic recruits.

The 35 parents charged in the investigation include executives and celebrities, such as "Desperate Housewives" star Felicity Huffman and "Full House" actress Lori Loughlin.

Lori Loughlin's college admissions scandal sentence will likely be harsher than Felicity Huffman's: US Attorney

  Lori Loughlin's college admissions scandal sentence will likely be harsher than Felicity Huffman's: US Attorney Lori Loughlin will likely face a tougher sentence than Felicity Huffman if convicted for her role in the college admissions scandal. Less than one month after Huffman was sentenced to 14 days in prison, U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts, Andrew Lelling, told WCVB in Boston that Loughlin may find herself in more trouble than her fellow actress for her part in the scandal that's swept up many wealthy parents. © FoxNews.com Legal experts Robert Patillo and Katie Cherkasky on the next steps in the college admissions scandal case.

In what is being called the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted, wealthy parents, Hollywood actresses, coaches and college prep executives have been accused of carrying out a nationwide fraud to get students into prestigious universities, according to a federal indictment.

A major college admissions scandal has laid bare the price of entry for some wealthy families — and the cost for everyone else. And this is also the world where you have incredibly high-end tutoring. This is not just spending a couple hours learning how to navigate an SAT.

Huffman was sentenced to 14 days in prison on Sept. 13 after pleading guilty to engaging in the college exam cheating scheme. Loughlin has pleaded not guilty.

Prosecutors said the Abbotts in 2018 arranged through Singer to have an associate pose as a proctor for their daughter’s ACT and SAT exams to correct her answers at a test center Singer controlled through bribery.

The proctor was Mark Riddell, a former counselor at a Florida private school who pleaded guilty in April to secretly taking SAT and ACT college entrance exams in place of Singer's clients' children or correcting their answers.

Prosecutors said the Abbotts' goal was to improve their daughter's prospects for gaining admission to Duke University, Marcia Abbott's alma mater.

In papers, the Abbotts' lawyers said they were good people who made an "aberrational, terrible decision." They argued the couple deserved a term of probation.

Ex-CEO of PIMCO to plead guilty in college admissions scandal .
Douglas Hodge, the former chief executive of investment giant PIMCO, is expected to plead guilty to an indictment charging him with conspiracy to commit fraud and money laundering, federal prosecutors in Boston said Thursday. The expected plea is the latest sign that some of the parents who have so far maintained their innocence in the college admissions scandal may be caving after months of legal wrangling and public scorn. Hodge, a resident of Laguna Beach, Calif., is accused of paying $525,000 to have his daughter and son admitted to the University of Southern California as phony soccer and football recruits.

—   Share news in the SOC. Networks

Topical videos:

usr: 2
This is interesting!