World: Wildlife Photographer of the Year award goes to Yongqing Bao for image of Tibetan fox attacking marmot - - PressFrom - Australia
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World Wildlife Photographer of the Year award goes to Yongqing Bao for image of Tibetan fox attacking marmot

06:55  16 october  2019
06:55  16 october  2019 Source:   abc.net.au

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  Tradies' heartwarming sacrifice: Generous workers give up their weekends to build a sanctuary for retired circus lions completely free of charge A group of 13 handymen are helping to build a veterinary building and an enclosure for three 15-year-old lions at Zambi Wildlife Retreat in Wallacia, 60km west of Sydney.A group of 13 handymen are helping to build a veterinary building and an enclosure for three 15-year-old lions at Zambi Wildlife Retreat in Wallacia, 60km west of Sydney, completely free of charge.

A rare, expressive image of a fox attacking a marmot won Chinese photographer Yongqing Bao the honor of Wildlife Photographer of the Year . Fourteen- year -old Cruz Erdmann won Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year , the competition’s other top distinction, for his underwater photograph of

Yongqing Bao , winner of the Wildlife Photographer of the year awards 2019 for his image The Moment, showing a standoff between a Tibetan fox and a marmotCredit Land of The Eagle by Audun Rikardsen was shot on the coast near his home in northern NorwayCredit: Audun Rikardsen.

a brown bear sitting on top of a grass covered field: The winning photo has been named The Moment. (Supplied: Yongqing Bao) © Supplied: Yongqing Bao The winning photo has been named The Moment. (Supplied: Yongqing Bao)

This picture may initially make you smile … at least until you realise the marmot is moments away from death.

"Photographically, it is quite simply the perfect moment."

That's how chief judge Roz Kidman Cox described the winning entry to the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, given out by London's Natural History Museum, announced Wednesday.

Pictures: Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019: Winning entries

The photograph, which depicts two animals coiled in a mortal scrap, was taken by Yongqing Bao, in China's Qilian Mountains in early spring after he had stalked them for some time, watching their interactions.

Bao beat out over 48,000 entries from 100 countries to take the top prize.

"The expressive intensity of the postures holds you transfixed, and the thread of energy between the raised paws seems to hold the protagonists in perfect balance," Ms Kidman Cox said.

"Images from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau are rare enough, but to have captured such a powerful interaction between a Tibetan fox and a marmot — two species key to the ecology of this high-grassland region — is extraordinary."

Director of the National History Museum Sir Michael Dixon said the image demonstrates the fragility of nature.

"This compelling picture captures nature's ultimate challenge — its battle for survival," he said.

"The area in which this was taken, often referred to as the 'third pole' because of the enormous water reserves held by its ice fields, is under threat from dramatic temperature rises like those seen in the Arctic.

"At a time when precious habitats are facing increasing climate pressures, seeing these fleeting yet fascinating moments reminds us of what we need to protect."

A 14-year-old New Zealander, Cruz Erdmann, picked up the award for Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year after capturing an iridescent big fin reef squid on a night dive in the Lembeh Strait off North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

"To dive in the pitch dark, find this beautiful squid and to be able to photograph it so elegantly, to reveal its wonderful shapes and colours, takes so much skill," judge Theo Bosboom said.

"What a resounding achievement for such a young photographer."

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Four crocodiles — one nicknamed Pugly by locals — are killed in abandoned fishing nets in Queensland's Cape York, infuriating locals. The saltwater beasts were snared in a large mullet net that was anchored to mangroves in the Escape River, near Turtle Head Island.Two had decayed to just their bones, the other two were bloated and floating belly up, believed to have died up to a week ago.A tourist came across the gruesome scene and alerted Turtle Head Island residents Rusty and Bronwyn Tully, who pulled the reptiles from the river yesterday.

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