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World How Boris Johnson CAN win over Westminster: PM starts 36 hours of frenetic deal-making to get his deal through Commons without the DUP after victory in Brussels as Jean-Claude Juncker said there will be NO extension past Oct 31

02:01  18 october  2019
02:01  18 october  2019 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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How Boris Johnson CAN win over Westminster : PM starts 36 hours of frenetic deal - making to get Brexit through Commons without the DUP after victory in Brussels as Jean - Claude Juncker says rejection by MPs would leave a 'very complicated situation'.

This is how Boris Johnson could win over enough MPs to get his deal through Parliament. Jean - Claude Juncker today hinted that the EU would not grant another Brexit delay. Boris Johnson needs 319 votes to win a majority. When MPs voted on Theresa May's Withdrawal Agreement for the

Boris Johnson holding a sign posing for the camera: Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a press conference at the European Commission headquarters EU Summit, Brussels, on Thursday © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a press conference at the European Commission headquarters EU Summit, Brussels, on Thursday Boris Johnson tonight began a frantic effort to get his Brexit deal passed by MPs as he warned Tory hardliners they face being stripped of the party whip if they fail to get behind him.

The Prime Minister faces a knife-edge Commons vote on what has been dubbed 'Super Saturday' as he attempts to get a majority for his agreement without the support of the Democratic Unionist Party.

Even if he gets the backing of all 287 Tory MPs, he will need to win over 33 others to get the 320 votes he needs for a majority.

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How Boris Johnson CAN win over Westminster : PM starts 36 This was Mr Johnson ’s first major concession, made early in September, and done with the DUP ’s agreement. Without such an arrangement, the problem of keeping open a border where cows can stand astride the line – become

Boris Johnson has been warned by furious London Tories that it would be an economic 'disaster' if the capital 'I’m privately making the case that to get our economy moving, and I mean However, senior Conservatives say the 'mood music' is that most places will be subject to the tougher levels

Ministers led by Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster Michael Gove were last night mounting a major operation to get the backing of the 21 ex-Tories stripped of the whip last month over their attempt to block No Deal, as well as potential Labour rebels.

a screenshot of a cell phone screen with text: A graphic showing what Boris Johnson needs to do to be able to edge victory on 'Super Saturday' © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A graphic showing what Boris Johnson needs to do to be able to edge victory on 'Super Saturday'

What is happening on Saturday?

Proceedings in the Commons will kick off at 9.30am with a statement from the Prime Minister giving an update on the Brussels summit. At some point, MPs will vote on his deal. The sitting can run until any time with no set finish time. The Lords will meet at 11am.

Will the deal pass?

Nigel Dodds, Arlene Foster are posing for a picture: The Prime Minister faces a knife-edge Commons vote tomorrow on what has been dubbed ‘Super Saturday’ as he attempts to get a majority for his agreement without the support of the Democratic Unionist Party © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The Prime Minister faces a knife-edge Commons vote tomorrow on what has been dubbed ‘Super Saturday’ as he attempts to get a majority for his agreement without the support of the Democratic Unionist Party The Democratic Unionist Party won't support it – making it more difficult for the Prime Minister to get the 320 votes for a majority. All 287 Tory MPs have been warned they will lose the whip if they do not back him, with hardline Brexiteers who voted down Theresa May's deal expected to cave in. This leaves Mr Johnson needing another 33 MPs, which he is hoping to make up from 21 ex-Tories who lost the whip attempting to block No Deal and Labour rebels.

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Academics from across the UK said the country cannot make unlimited sacrifice. Thirty -two top academics have called on Boris Johnson and his scientific and medical advisers to avoid a The PM faces a mounting Tory rebellion tonight over plans to retighten the lockdown screw on hard-pressed Chief Scientific Adviser Sir Patrick Vallance warned this morning that without action there will be 50

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So it's a Yes or No vote?

Xavier Bettel, Boris Johnson, Michel Barnier standing in front of a crowd: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, center, is greeted by Luxembourg's Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, center left, during a round table meeting at an EU summit in Brussels on Thursday © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, center, is greeted by Luxembourg's Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, center left, during a round table meeting at an EU summit in Brussels on Thursday Potentially not. Rebel MPs are looking at the possibility of amending Mr Johnson's deal so that he is forced to seek a Brexit extension beyond October 31 – even if his agreement has been passed. Votes on any amendments will take place ahead of the main vote on the deal. Campaigners for a second referendum were plotting to force Mr Johnson to hold a confirmatory public vote on his deal, but they are thought to have dropped this plan as they do not think they have the numbers for it to pass. The SNP last night tabled an amendment demanding a Brexit delay until at least February 2020 and a general election.

What happens next if the deal passes?

Brexit day of reckoning: parliament to vote on Johnson's deal

  Brexit day of reckoning: parliament to vote on Johnson's deal Brexit day of reckoning: parliament to vote on Johnson's dealPrime Minister Boris Johnson puts his last-minute Brexit deal to a vote in an extraordinary sitting of the British parliament on Saturday, a day of reckoning that could decide the course of the United Kingdom's departure from the European Union.

Boris Johnson was live on TV in central lobby within minutes of the deal emerging last night Mr Rees-Mogg and his deputy Mark Francois, stood side by side with the DUP 's Nigel Dodds to Surrounded by over a dozen political reporters, they warned the proposal looked like it would breach

Boris Johnson has begun putting together his Cabinet after securing a landslide victory in the Tory He said Mr Johnson gave no clues as to who might get what jobs and said the whole meeting " was done He tells Mr Johnson that he will " be a great PM for our country at this critical moment"

Jacob Rees-Mogg wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg arrives at Downing Street on Thursday © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg arrives at Downing Street on Thursday A vote for the deal will fire the starting gun on a frantic rush in Parliament to pass all the legislation needed for Brexit to happen on October 31. MPs and peers could be expected to sit around the clock and at weekends in order to get the Withdrawal Agreement Bill through in time. Downing Street yesterday insisted it was 'confident' there is enough time to pass the legislation without the need for a 'technical extension' that could see Brexit delayed by just a couple of weeks so everything is in place. The European Parliament will also be asked to approve the deal.

... and if it's rejected?

Boris Johnson et al. standing next to a man in a suit and tie: A smiling Boris Johnson, pictured centre, speaks with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, left, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Thursday at the EU summit © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A smiling Boris Johnson, pictured centre, speaks with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, left, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Thursday at the EU summit Under the terms of the Benn Act, which was passed by rebel MPs last month, Mr Johnson is required to send a letter to Brussels requesting a delay to Brexit beyond October 31 if a deal is not passed by the end of tomorrow. The Prime Minister has repeatedly insisted he will not seek for an extension, but he could be forced to by the courts if he refuses. The most likely outcome is that the Government is forced to request a Brexit extension and then Mr Johnson calls a general election and asks voters to give him enough MPs so that he can finally pass his deal. Jeremy Corbyn has indicated he will back an election once No Deal on October 31 is off the table.

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Another extension?

Although European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker appeared to rule out another extension yesterday, European Council leader Donald Tusk refused to do so. Ultimately, the decision rests with EU leaders and it is likely an extension of some sort would be granted to avoid a No Deal scenario.

Mr Johnson is also understood to have been personally ringing around Tory backbenchers on his mobile to talk them through the proposals.

Backbenchers were also invited to briefings on the deal hosted by ministers including Mr Gove, Home Secretary Miss Patel and Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab.

And it is understood Mr Gove, Culture Secretary Nicky Morgan and Justice Secretary Robert Buckland held a meeting with 11 of the 21 MPs who lost the whip.

The crunch vote will take place tomorrow as the Commons meets for the first time on a Saturday since the Falklands War.

Mr Johnson said last night: 'I am very confident that when my colleagues in Parliament study this agreement they will want to vote for it on Saturday.

'Now is the moment for our parliamentarians to come together and get this thing done.'

Asked at a press conference in Brussels whether Tories who vote against a deal will be stripped of the whip, Mr Johnson said the vote will be taken 'very seriously' as he declined to answer the question directly. 

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  Brexit delay request sent to EU, along with letter arguing against it The British Government formally asks the European Union for a delay to Brexit — but also sends a letter from Prime Minister Boris Johnson arguing against it. Mr Johnson was forced to request an extension after Parliament voted to delay a decision on whether to back his Brexit deal.A law passed last month compelled the Government to try and postpone Britain's departure if no deal were agreed to by Saturday night (local time).

Boris Johnson, Emmanuel Macron standing next to a person in a suit and tie: Boris Johnson and Mr Macron shaking hands and appearing in good spirits at the crunch EU summit on Thursday © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Boris Johnson and Mr Macron shaking hands and appearing in good spirits at the crunch EU summit on Thursday However, the Mail understands the Prime Minister has privately warned Eurosceptics they will be cast out of the party if they do not support a deal.

Some 28 members of the European Research Group (ERG) refused to back Theresa May's deal when it was voted on for a third time in March, but even the most hardline Brexiteers yesterday signalled they could vote for an agreement this time.

Peter Bone, Andrew Bridgen, Sir Bernard Jenkin and Andrea Jenkyns were among those suggesting they could support it.

Mr Bridgen told BBC Radio 4's PM programme: 'It is a far better deal than Theresa May's... I am very encouraged and the more I read the more I like it.'

Others such as Priti Patel, Theresa Villiers and James Duddridge are now ministers so will be expected to vote for it.

Commons leader Jacob Rees-Mogg, who used to lead the ERG, yesterday called on all its members to back the deal.

Speaking in the Commons, he said: 'All Eurosceptics – all my friends who sit where I used to sit – can rally around this great deal

'It is a really good exciting deal that takes out the undemocratic backstop, delivers on what the Prime Minister promised he would do. 

'In 85 days he has achieved something which could not be achieved in three years.'

a pencil and paper: This is how Boris Johnson could win over enough MPs to get his deal through Parliament. He faces a uphill struggle to win the vote on Saturday © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited This is how Boris Johnson could win over enough MPs to get his deal through Parliament. He faces a uphill struggle to win the vote on Saturday Asked in Brussels whether the 21 MPs would have the whip restored if they back the deal, Mr Johnson said: 'It is a big and important vote and we will be making further announcements about that in due course. There are a series of votes.'

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Six of the group – Richard Benyon, Greg Clark, Stephen Hammond, Richard Harrington, Sir Oliver Letwin and Sir Nicholas Soames – yesterday indicated they were planning to vote for the deal.

Sir Nicholas told BBC Newsnight: 'My quarrel with the Prime Minister was over nothing except for No Deal. So there is a deal, and I will vote for it and so will many of my colleagues who had the whip taken away from them.

Nicos Anastasiades, Boris Johnson are posing for a picture: A buoyed Mr Johnson speaks with Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel, pictured centre right, and other European leaders on Thursday © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A buoyed Mr Johnson speaks with Germany's Chancellor Angela Merkel, pictured centre right, and other European leaders on Thursday

'It's been a very painful time – not just for Parliament, but for the country. Families have split. Businesses have split. 

'The country is split, which is why Parliament is split. 'And it is, therefore time I think to say that this is the end of a very painful time.'

He added: 'I think the Prime Minister needs to make plain he regards this as a healing deal – as an opportunity to try and heal the rifts in the House and in parties elsewhere, and to put out a hand to all parties to come together on this.'

He continued: 'It's not a great deal, this isn't a great deal, but it's not a bad deal. I think you can assume that the 21 will by and large vote for it.'

a screenshot of a cell phone: Chris Hughes, Account Director at Cicero Global, tweeted a table showing all the possible scenarios on what has been dubbed 'Super Saturday' in the Commons © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Chris Hughes, Account Director at Cicero Global, tweeted a table showing all the possible scenarios on what has been dubbed 'Super Saturday' in the Commons

Asked yesterday what would happen if the Commons votes down the deal, Mr Gove told Sky News: 'We don't contemplate defeat.'

A No10 spokesman said: 'We want all MPs to support it. The PM believes this is the best way forward for the whole of the UK.

'It protects the union, it removes the backstop and deals with the unique circumstances on the island of Ireland and MPs this weekend have an opportunity to back a deal that means the UK leaving the EU in an orderly way on October 31.'  

PM calls again for election as opposition MPs move closer to support

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'Come together' and get it done: Boris takes his battle back to Westminster with call for MPs' backing after securing last-gasp Brexit deal against all the odds

Boris Johnson last night urged MPs to 'come together' and get Brexit done after securing an extraordinary last-minute deal.

In a remarkable turnaround, the Prime Minister agreed a deal with the EU which scraps the hated Irish backstop and leaves the UK free to strike trade deals around the world.

Tomorrow he will put the deal to MPs on a historic Saturday sitting of Parliament as he continues a frantic dash to keep his pledge to take Britain out of the European Union by October 31.

In Brussels last night, Mr Johnson delivered an emphatic message to MPs, saying: 'It hasn't always been an easy experience for the UK.

a man wearing a suit and tie: In Brussels last night, Mr Johnson delivered an emphatic message to MPs, saying: ‘It hasn’t always been an easy experience for the UK © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited In Brussels last night, Mr Johnson delivered an emphatic message to MPs, saying: ‘It hasn’t always been an easy experience for the UK

'It has been long, it has been painful, it has been divisive, and now is the moment for us as a country to come together.

'Now this is the moment for our parliamentarians to come together and get this thing done.'

The deal came at a price, with Mr Johnson's DUP allies refusing to back it and accusing the PM of 'driving a coach and horses' through the Good Friday Agreement. The loss of ten DUP MPs leaves him facing an uphill struggle to win tomorrow's vote.

Allies of Mr Johnson believe his strenuous efforts will play well with an electorate desperate to get the tortuous Brexit process over, even if his deal is defeated by MPs.

They are gearing up for an election within weeks in which Mr Johnson will urge the public to give him a majority to finally deliver Brexit.

But David Cameron's former spin chief, Sir Craig Oliver, warned the strategy was high-risk, saying: 'I suspect Boris Johnson and his team think they have the numbers to pass the deal without the DUP – but even if they don't, they get to run a populist election campaign, which should be enough. But it's so volatile a change of just a few points could be disastrous.'

Last night a concerted effort was under way to woo Labour MPs in Leave-voting areas to back the deal in return for guarantees on workers' rights and environmental standards. Allies of the PM believe he needs to win the support of 15 Labour MPs to have a chance of victory.

European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker also turned up the pressure on MPs, saying 'there will be no prolongation', after holding talks with Mr Johnson.

Jean-Claude Juncker wearing a suit and tie: European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker also turned up the pressure on MPs, saying 'there will be no prolongation', after holding talks with Mr Johnson © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker also turned up the pressure on MPs, saying 'there will be no prolongation', after holding talks with Mr Johnson

In another bid to ramp up the pressure, senior Tories made it clear that Eurosceptic hardliners who voted against the deal would have the whip withdrawn.

Whips have also indicated that the 21 Tory MPs kicked out last month for helping rule out No Deal could be invited back in if they help push the deal through Parliament.

The breakthrough came as:

Downing Street said Mr Johnson had confounded his critics who said he was interested only in No Deal. A senior source said: 'We were told that the EU would never reopen the Withdrawal Agreement. 

We were told it was impossible to replace the backstop. We were told Northern Ireland could not leave the customs union. The PM has achieved all of those things and more.

'This gets Great Britain totally out, with special arrangements for Northern Ireland covered by democratic consent. We are taking back control.'

The new deal strips out the controversial Irish backstop and replaces it with a complex deal for Northern Ireland designed to prevent a hard border. 

Nigel Dodds, Arlene Foster are posing for a picture: The DUP's deputy leader Nigel Dodds (left) criticised the PM, saying: 'He has been too eager by far to get a deal at any cost. If he held his nerve and held out he would have got better concessions that kept the integrity of the UK' © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The DUP's deputy leader Nigel Dodds (left) criticised the PM, saying: 'He has been too eager by far to get a deal at any cost. If he held his nerve and held out he would have got better concessions that kept the integrity of the UK'

Under the terms of the agreement, the province will remain aligned with single market rules for all goods and will have to levy the same rate of VAT as the Irish Republic. 

It will also have to accept customs checks on goods arriving from the rest of the UK – effectively a customs border in the Irish Sea, which Mr Johnson once vowed to oppose.

But, crucially, the EU also agreed to a form of democratic consent, which will give Northern Ireland the opportunity to leave the arrangement every four years if a majority in the devolved Stormont Parliament vote for it. Mr Johnson said it was 'an excellent deal for Northern Ireland'.

But the DUP's deputy leader Nigel Dodds criticised the PM, saying: 'He has been too eager by far to get a deal at any cost. If he held his nerve and held out he would have got better concessions that kept the integrity of the UK.'

Mr Johnson said he was 'very confident' of getting the deal through. But privately, aides admit they face a fierce battle.

One senior source said: 'MPs should get Brexit done, but they are too mad – they're bound to vote it down.'

Failure to win the vote would leave the PM on a collision course with Parliament and the courts over the controversial law that will force him to seek an extension if he has not got a deal by tomorrow night.

But last night there were signs that the 28 Eurosceptic 'Spartan' MPs – who voted down Theresa May's deal three times – were warming to the agreement. Andrew Bridgen, of the European Research Group, said he was willing to back the deal despite the DUP's opposition.

He said: 'This is far more palatable to me. It looks like Brexit, it smells like Brexit. That's Brexit for me.'

Sir Nicholas Soames, one of the 21 Tories expelled last month, said he would back the deal, and predicted most of the group would do the same.

Rotherham MP Kevin Barron last night became the first Labour MP to publicly back the deal.

Pictures: Brexit: A timeline


PM calls again for election as opposition MPs move closer to support .
Boris Johnson has demanded MPs who voted down his Brexit bill last night now back a general election to break the deadlock. The prime minister said he wanted to deliver Britain's departure from the EU on 31 October, with Downing Street briefing he had told Brussels it was in everyone's interests for no delay to be granted.Mr Corbyn claimed the divorce deal secured last week was a "worse than terrible treaty".Their fiery clash at PMQs came just minutes after a sit-down meeting between the two, their chief whips and most senior advisers.

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