World: Wasn’t Japan’s Emperor Just Enthroned? The Really Big Throne Is Still to Come - - PressFrom - Australia
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World Wasn’t Japan’s Emperor Just Enthroned? The Really Big Throne Is Still to Come

07:15  22 october  2019
07:15  22 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

Hundreds of dignitaries to attend as Japan's new emperor declares enthronement

  Hundreds of dignitaries to attend as Japan's new emperor declares enthronement Hundreds of dignitaries to attend as Japan's new emperor declares enthronementNaruhito, 59, acceded to the throne in May after his father, Akihito, became the first monarch to abdicate in two centuries.

TOKYO — Six months ago, Naruhito, the new emperor of Japan , received a sword, a jewel and official seals in a sacred ceremony that heralded his succession to the throne after his father, Akihito, became the first emperor to abdicate in more than 200 years. It turns out that was only a prelude.

TOKYO — As part of the historic handover of Japan ’ s imperial throne on Wednesday, the incoming emperor , Naruhito, will receive a sword, a jewel and official seals in a sacred ceremony that dates back thousands of years.

a person standing in front of a building: Women in traditional dress on Tuesday at the Imperial Palace, where Naruhito will be proclaimed the new emperor before the rest of the world. © Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters Women in traditional dress on Tuesday at the Imperial Palace, where Naruhito will be proclaimed the new emperor before the rest of the world.

TOKYO — Six months ago, Naruhito, the new emperor of Japan, received a sword, a jewel and official seals in a sacred ceremony that heralded his succession to the throne after his father, Akihito, became the first emperor to abdicate in more than 200 years.

It turns out that was only a prelude.

On Tuesday, Naruhito, 59, will take part in another enthronement ceremony — one in which he will formally declare his ascension to the world’s oldest monarchy — and this time he will actually get to sit on a really big throne.

'More like us': Japan's new imperial couple puts relaxed face on monarchy

  'More like us': Japan's new imperial couple puts relaxed face on monarchy 'More like us': Japan's new imperial couple puts relaxed face on monarchyTOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako have brought a more relaxed touch to one of the world's oldest monarchies, chatting in English with foreign visitors, laughing with children and even playing with dogs.

Japan ' s Emperor Naruhito attends a ceremony at the Hotel des Invalides in Paris, France TOKYO — Japan ' s new Emperor Naruhito will formally proclaim his ascension to the throne on Tuesday in a The event comes just over a week after Typhoon Hagibis slammed into Japan , killing at least 80

Japan ' s new Emperor Naruhito on Tuesday began a series of ritual-bound ceremonies that complete his ascension to the ancient Chrysanthemum throne . Heavy rain pounded Tokyo's lavish imperial palace as hundreds of guests gathered for the once-in-a-generation event.

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Also this time: The empress, Masako, Naruhito’s wife of 26 years, will be in the room. In May, Masako, 55, was not allowed to attend the ascension ceremony, in part because Imperial Household law prohibits women from succeeding to the throne.

Why the long gap between ceremonies? A new emperor usually takes the throne after his predecessor dies. A short ceremony is quickly arranged, and a bigger event — the one being held on Tuesday — follows some time later. (When Naruhito’s father, Akihito, took the throne, he waited a full year after the death of his father, Hirohito, the wartime emperor.)

The second ceremony is designed in part to proclaim the new emperor before the rest of the world. Watching from nearby observation rooms in the Imperial Palace on Tuesday will be dignitaries from 183 countries, including Prince Charles of Britain; King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima of the Netherlands; Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the civilian leader of Myanmar; President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines; Carrie Lam, the chief executive of Hong Kong; and Elaine Chao, the United States transportation secretary. (At the enthronement of Naruhito’s father, Vice President Dan Quayle represented the United States.)

Fate of Japan's imperial dynasty rests on shoulders of 13-year-old

  Fate of Japan's imperial dynasty rests on shoulders of 13-year-old When Japan's youngest prince, Hisahito, visited Bhutan in August on his first overseas trip just months after his uncle Naruhito became emperor, his trip was regarded as the debut of a future monarch on the world stage. Greeting his hosts in traditional "hakama" kimono and trying his hand at archery, the visit was rare public exposure for the boy on whose shoulders the future of the monarchy rests.Emperor Naruhito, 59, who became monarch on May 1 following the abdication of his father, Akihito, will proclaim his enthronement in an Oct. 22 ceremony before foreign and domestic dignitaries.

How the Enthronement of Japan ’ s New Emperor Will Work: QuickTake. Royalty such as Britain’s Prince Charles and King Mswati III of Eswatini, formerly Swaziland, are among those set to Next in line to the throne is Naruhito’s younger brother, Akishino, 53, followed by Akishino’s son, Hisahito, 13.

Japan ' s new Emperor Naruhito on Tuesday began a series of ritual-bound ceremonies that complete his ascension to the ancient Chrysanthemum throne . Heavy rain pounded Tokyo's lavish imperial palace as hundreds of guests gathered for the once-in-a-generation event.

Despite the considerable pomp and a series of banquets that will continue through the evening, the government decided to postpone a celebratory parade through the streets of Tokyo in deference to the victims of Typhoon Hagibis, which killed at least 80 people this month.

The parade is now scheduled for Nov. 10. Four days later, yet another ceremony will be held, a mysterious affair in which the emperor may or may not have conjugal relations with a goddess.

Game of Thrones

The most visible royal paraphernalia in Tuesday’s ceremony will be the two thrones for the emperor and empress, made more than 100 years ago.

Most of the time, the thrones — known as the takamikura for the emperor, and the michodai for the empress — are stored at the Kyoto Imperial Palace, where the royal family ruled until the mid-19th century.

Each throne is made of thousands of small wood parts. In preparation for Tuesday’s ceremony, the thrones were disassembled more than a year ago and shipped in trucks to the Imperial Palace in Tokyo. Craftsmen reconstructed them and touched up their lacquer coating.

Wales book spot in Rugby World Cup semi-finals

  Wales book spot in Rugby World Cup semi-finals Wales are through to the semi-finals of the Rugby World Cup after beating France 20-19. © Getty OITA, JAPAN - OCTOBER 20: Dan Biggar of Wales is tackled by Romain Ntamack and Gregorie Alldritt of France during the Rugby World Cup 2019 Quarter Final match between Wales and France at Oita Stadium on October 20, 2019 in Oita, Japan. (Photo by Dan They will now face either Japan or South Africa for a place in the final - the teams play later on Sunday.Ross Moriarty scored the winning try which was converted in Oita as Wales edged in front in the 74th minute of the match.

Japan ' s Emperor Naruhito is set to formally ascend the throne in an elaborate ceremony on His ascension comes as Japan is still reeling from the effects of Typhoon Hagibis, which left almost 80 How big of a deal is this? A pretty huge deal. The last time an enthronement ceremony took place

TOKYO — A day after his father became the first monarch to abdicate the imperial throne of Japan in more than two centuries, the new emperor , Naruhito, on Wednesday received the sacred imperial regalia that represents his rightful succession to the world’ s oldest monarchy.

For the ceremony, the thrones will be set up in a stateroom on canopied podiums more than four feet off the wooden floor.

Including the podium height, Naruhito’s throne, which has vermilion handrails, is about 21 feet high. The throne for Masako (who is taller than her husband) is nearly 19 feet high.

When the imperial couple first enter the stateroom — the emperor goes first — they will be seated on the podiums, hidden from view behind curtains made of purple silk with scarlet lining.

The few other people in the room will be members of the imperial family, court chamberlains, ladies-in-waiting, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, leaders of the two houses of Parliament and the chief justice of the Supreme Court. Everybody else — including reporters — will watch from other rooms.

Chamberlains will bring out the imperial regalia again, placing the sword, jewel and official seals on tables to the right and left of the emperor.

At the sound of a gong, a chamberlain and a lady-in-waiting will open the curtains, revealing the emperor and empress.

The Weight of the World

Where you can see almost every royal in the world today

  Where you can see almost every royal in the world today A buffet of royals from around the world are descending on one place today, and royal fans are suitably ecstatic. Japanese Emperor Naruhito, 59, is gearing up for his enthronement at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo. To mark the occasion, around 200 foreign heads of state and dignitaries will attend the ceremony, followed by a banquet hosted by the prime minister, Shinzo Abe.

Japan ' s new Emperor Naruhito will formally proclaim his ascension to the throne on Tuesday in a ritual-bound ceremony, but the after-effects of a deadly typhoon will cast a shadow over proceedings. Naruhito officially assumed his duties as emperor on May 1, a day after his father became the first

The Enthronement of the Emperor of Japan (即位の礼 Sokui no rei) is an ancient ceremony that marks the accession of a new monarch to the Chrysanthemum Throne

Naruhito will be dressed in a silk orange robe and a crown. Some reports say the robe is dyed with the juice of sumac berries, but others say it is merely a chemical dye. In any case, the color is meant to symbolize the orange hue of the sun when it reaches its highest point in the sky — Japan, after all, is the Land of the Rising Sun.

Masako will be wearing a multilayered kimono, in a design that dates to the 10th century and is known as itsutsuginu karaginu mo. The layers of cloth weigh close to 35 pounds. She will also wear a wig in an elaborate hairstyle that looks like stiff wings or large Mickey Mouse ears growing from the side of her head.

To Banzai or Not to Banzai

After the curtains are opened on the thrones, the guests will bow to the emperor (although instructions given to foreign dignitaries stipulate that they do not have to bow unless they choose to.)

The emperor will give a speech, and then Mr. Abe will lead the audience in three cheers of “Banzai!” — literally, “A thousand years!”

Right at the moment the prime minister shouts the first syllable of the first cheer, Japanese soldiers — signaled by a wireless command — will fire off 105-millimeter howitzers from a battery in Kitanomaru Park, about half a mile from the palace.

Critics say these cheers (again, foreigners can abstain), led as they are by the prime minister standing below the emperor on his podium, may violate Japan’s Constitution, which states that the emperor is “the symbol of the state and of the unity of the people, deriving his position from the will of the people with whom resides sovereign power.”

A bunch of royal family members are heading to Japan this week for a very special event

  A bunch of royal family members are heading to Japan this week for a very special event Various elite royal family members from Britain and Europe are heading to Japan for Emperor Naruhito's enthronement this week, and it's guaranteed to be a right royal spectacle. This week, we're in for a royal spectacle as members of Europe's royal family's flock to Japan for a very special occasion. Indeed Prince Charles, Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary, King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia of Spain and King Willem-Alexander and his wife Queen Maxima of the Netherlands are all visiting the Asian country as a new royal role is filled - and it's an exciting one.

Japan ' s new Emperor Naruhito will formally proclaim his ascension to the throne on Tuesday in a ritual-bound ceremony, but the after-effects of a deadly typhoon will cast a shadow over proceedings. Naruhito officially assumed his duties as emperor on May 1, a day after his father became the first

TOKYO — Ten months after Japan ’ s octogenarian emperor indicated he wanted to give up the throne while he was still alive, the cabinet of Emperor Akihito has also come to represent the pacifism enshrined in the Constitution and has acted as the country’s emissary of historic reconciliation with

But That’s Not All

Now, things get really interesting.

On the night of Nov. 14, the emperor will take part in another ceremony: a secret ritual, known as the daijosai, that occurs inside two of a series of temporary wooden buildings erected just for the occasion in the east gardens of the Imperial Palace.

Nobody knows for sure what happens during the rites, which have roots in Shinto, Japan’s indigenous religion. The emperor is said to offer rice and other specially prepared foods to Amaterasu Omikami, the sun goddess from whom all emperors, according to legend, are descended.

In part of the ceremony, the emperor enters an inner sanctuary at night on his own, accompanied only by two ladies-in-waiting. Analysts and Shinto ritualists have offered different speculation about what, exactly, Naruhito will do in there while 1,000 guests wait outside.

There is a bed inside the sanctum, so some say the emperor lies down with his ancestors and enters into spiritual communion with the gods. Others say he actually becomes a god (though the emperor’s godlike status was annulled by the Americans after World War II). Another theory holds that he has a conjugal visit with the sun goddess.

What bothers some critics is that about 2.1 billion yen — or more than $19 million — in taxpayer funds is spent on a religious ceremony.

The Japanese Communist Party is boycotting the festivities to protest what it sees as a constitutional violation. Even Crown Prince Akishino, Naruhito’s younger brother, questioned whether the state should be financing a religious rite.

For now, the criticism is tempered in part by the fact that the imperial family remains beloved in Japan: According to a September poll by NHK, the public broadcaster, more than 70 percent of respondents said they felt an affinity for the family.

But in the longer term, the imperial household faces a more existential threat. It is running out of heirs. After the current emperor, his only successors are his 53-year-old brother, Akishino, and Akishino’s son, the 13-year-old Hisahito. Naruhito’s 83-year-old uncle, Hitachi, is also technically in line.

Unless the Imperial Household Law is revised to admit women as heirs to the throne, the teenage Hisahito could be the end of the line, and debates over the validity of enthronement ceremonies and their cost could be moot.

Research was contributed by Makiko Inoue, Hisako Ueno and Eimi Yamamitsu.

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