World: Trash to treasure: Everest garbage given new lease of life - - PressFrom - Australia
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World Trash to treasure: Everest garbage given new lease of life

08:30  22 october  2019
08:30  22 october  2019 Source:   msn.com

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Mount Everest has a mountain of a problem: human waste. And not just leftover camping meals, beer and fuel cans, but human poo, too. So, how much poopy and other garbage calls the planet's highest mountain home? A Tech Times story describes the mountain as "the world's highest garbage dump."

Among the 11 tons of recovered trash from the 45-day project are food wrappers, cans, bottles and Nepalese army men pile up the garbage collected from Mount Everest in Namche Bajar With at least 11 people losing their lives , this has been the deadliest climbing season on Mount Everest since 2015.

A group of tourists sip water at a five-star hotel in Kathmandu, unaware that the green glasses in their hands were once bottles discarded on Mount Everest -- left by climbers eager to make their ascent.

a group of people walking across a snow covered mountain: Mount Everest has been dubbed world's highest rubbish dump© Doma SHERPA Mount Everest has been dubbed world's highest rubbish dump In homes across the Nepali capital upcycled items, from pots to lamps, crafted from Everest waste products are slowly making their way as authorities and businesses look for fresh ways to tackle the damage caused by decades of commercial mountaineering.

After heavy criticism, Nepal's government and mountaineering groups this year organised a six-week clean-up© PRAKASH MATHEMA After heavy criticism, Nepal's government and mountaineering groups this year organised a six-week clean-up

Tonnes of trash -- including empty cans and gas canisters, bottles, plastic and discarded climbing gear -- litter the mountain, which has been dubbed the "highest dumpster in the world".

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Retired New York sanitation worker Nelson Molina spent the past 30 years collecting items from trash bags that New Yorkers kept throwing away.

Eco- Everest clean-up expeditions led by Dawa Steven Sherpa each year since 2008 have retrieved 15,000 kg (33,070 lbs) of trash , but there are no estimates of garbage left behind. Some 4,000 climbers have scaled Mount Everest so far. Snow shrouds the bodies of at least 260 who died trying.

a pile of luggage: Mountaineers warn that this year's clean-up collected just a fraction of the rubbish on Mount Everest© PRAKASH MATHEMA Mountaineers warn that this year's clean-up collected just a fraction of the rubbish on Mount Everest

"Waste doesn't need to be wasted," Nabin Bikash Maharjan of local recycling organisation Blue Waste to Value (BW2V) told AFP.

"We received a mix of materials from Everest -- aluminium, glass, plastic, iron -- much of which could be recycled," he explained, adding: "We need to up-cycle and add value to them."

After heavy criticism for the condition of one of its greatest natural resources, Nepal's government and mountaineering groups this year organised a six-week clean-up.

Scaling almost 8,000 metres (26,300 feet) from base camp to the closest camp to the summit, a 14-strong team retrieved more than 10 tonnes of trash that was flown or driven to recycling centres in Kathmandu.

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LUKLA, Nepal — Last weekend, a group of Sherpas gathered outside Buddha Lodge in this speck of a town near Mount Everest , stuffing cloth sacks filled with thousands of pounds of garbage into a turboprop plane.

Отмена. Месяц бесплатно. Trash to treasure - Garbage Picking Beautiful Furniture. TheEveOfReduction. Загрузка 30 Best Ideas How to Reuse Old Things - Trash to Treasure Projects - Recycled Home Decor Ideas - Продолжительность: 2:58 Mary Tardito 100 027 просмотров.

Workers there manually sorted the materials -- each type following a different path to rebirth: Iron was sent to rod manufacturing firms, shredded aluminium cans to utensil makers, and discarded bottles re-fashioned into household items.

"Waste is a taboo in our society, considered as dirt," mused Ujen Wangmo Lepcha of Moware Designs, which upcycles rubbish into light fixtures and glasses.

"When they see these kind of products they are like 'wow', these things can be made and it is possible," she explained.

Their products are now used in upmarket hotels, restaurants, and homes around the capital, and Lepcha says there is growing consumer interest in goods made from salvaged Everest scraps.

Aanchal Malla of Hotel Yak & Yeti, a luxury five-star hotel in Kathmandu, said opting for the upcycled goods was in-line with the hotel's move towards sustainable and environmentally friendly products.

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NEW DELHI — Hoping to clean a trash -strewn pathway to the world’s highest peak, Nepal’s tourism authority declared Monday that those climbing Mount Everest must return from the trip with an extra 18 pounds of garbage .

The Trash to Treasure program ensures that students have a place to donate their unwanted new and/or gently used items, which both reduces the amount of trash During the week of finals, you can find a collection station in or near your place of residence to give away (almost) any item that you do

a group of people wearing costumes: Workers there manually sorted the materials -- with discarded bottles re-fashioned into household items© PRAKASH MATHEMA Workers there manually sorted the materials -- with discarded bottles re-fashioned into household items

"It is not just better for us and the environment but then it goes way bigger than that... it is encouragement of everyone who is trying to move into that direction of making the globe into a better place, reducing all the waste," Malla said.

A new waste facility -- called Sagarmatha Next after the Nepali name for Everest -- is also being completed in Syangboche at an altitude of nearly 3,800 metres (12,400 feet), passed by trekkers and mountaineers on the way to the base camp.

a person holding a bottle of wine on a table: Recycled products are now used in upmarket hotels, restaurants and homes around the capital© PRAKASH MATHEMA Recycled products are now used in upmarket hotels, restaurants and homes around the capital

It will process garbage, and collaborate with artists and innovators to make new products in a bid to tap into this burgeoning market for Everest 'products'.

- 'Everest polluters must pay' -

But mountaineers warn that this year's clean-up collected just a fraction of Mount Everest's rubbish -- with the higher and harder to reach camps still littered by abandoned gear.

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“ Everest is our crown jewel in the world,” Shahi said. “We should not take it for granted. The amount of trash there is damaging our pride.” Although climbers need to deposit ,000 with the government, which is refunded only after they provide proof of having brought the garbage generated by them from

“ Everest is our crown jewel in the world,” Shahi said. “We should not take it for granted. The amount of trash there is damaging our pride.” Although climbers need to deposit ,000 with the government, which is refunded only after they provide proof of having brought the garbage generated by them from

a person drinking from a wine glass: Using upcycled goods was in line with some hotels move towards sustainable and environmentally friendly products© PRAKASH MATHEMA Using upcycled goods was in line with some hotels move towards sustainable and environmentally friendly products

Melting glaciers, caused by global warming, are revealing years-old waste but as the number of climbers attempting to summit soars so do the environmental challenges.

Eleven climbers died in the 2019 Everest season, with industry insiders criticising Nepal for issuing a record 381 permits -- leading to high numbers on the mountain and bottlenecks to the summit.

Not all the bodies can be brought down so corpses too lie abandoned on the slopes.

Water sources downstream of the 8,848-metre Himalayan peak have been contaminated by everything from human excrement to empty gas canisters.

Locals say some big-spending foreign climbers -- it costs at least $30,000 to tackle Everest -- pay little attention to the ugly footprint they leave behind, even when given financial incentives.

Six years ago, Nepal implemented a $4,000 rubbish deposit per team, to be refunded if each climber brought down at least eight kilogrammes (18 pounds) of waste, but only half of them returned with their trash.

In August, the Everest region municipality announced it would ban some single-use plastics and drinks in plastic bottles from the area from early 2020.

Community NGO Sagarmatha Pollution Control Committee, along with BW2V and other agencies, recently launched a campaign to transport waste to recycling centres by harnessing the roughly 50,000 trekkers and their guides who visit the region every year -- not all attempt the summit but many travel to base camp.

They are each asked to carry a one kilogram (2.2 pounds) pouch of processed trash to Lukla, the gateway to the Everest region, or Kathmandu for recycling.

"We have to work year after year to make a real impact," Ang Dorje Sherpa of the committee told AFP, but warned that recycling alone was not the solution.

"In the long-term we need is to minimise the trash at the source, and make the polluters responsible for the cleaning."

The Ocean Cleanup expands to polluted rivers .
Watch The Ocean Cleanup unveil its new automated system The Interceptor, which will be deployed to catch plastic debris in rivers before it reaches our oceans.The Interceptor is a large scalable device that'll be anchored to riverbeds to autonomously catch plastic as it flows along. The group says the Interceptor can extract 50,000 kilograms (about 110,000 pounds) of trash per day and could potentially collect up to "100,000 kg per day under optimized conditions." The device is designed to be environmentally friendly. It's solar powered, and lithium-ion batteries let it work day and night without producing noise or exhaust fumes, the group says.

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