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World 'Brexit identity' more important to voters than party allegiance

02:40  10 december  2019
02:40  10 december  2019 Source:   aljazeera.com

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British politics was relatively stable in the post-war decades, and voters ’ strong party loyalties were influenced by their place in society. More recently, there has been a marked decline in the number of people identifying with a political party , and in the strength of that attachment.

More than double the number of voters now care more about their Brexit position than party affiliationCredit: Alamy Live News. A total of 55% of Brits now say they very strongly identify with their backing for either Leave or Remain. The figure is up from 44% a year ago, showing feelings are only

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Voters in the United Kingdom care less about political parties than they do about having voted Leave or Remain in the 2016 referendum to withdraw from the European Union, according to new research.

The 52per cent to 48 per cent vote to leave the bloc has left the country deeply polarised, academics at Kings College London suggested on Monday.

They added that the way people had voted on Europe has come to define their politics more than party allegiance.

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The UK has higher voter volatility than ever before, according to the British Election Study; the traditional two- party race has given way to a clutch of competitors and no-one really knows whether, when it comes to 12 December, the electorate will choose to vote according to their Brexit identities

Tony Blair has urged voters not to elect MPs who "back Brexit at any cost", whichever party they are from. The ex-PM told the BBC that Brexit was a bigger issue than party allegiance for the general election on 8 June. He said the Tories were likely to win but a big Labour vote could constrain the PM

a group of people posing for the camera: A pro-Brexit protester brandishes a sign near pro-Europe demonstrators outside the Houses of Parliament [Dylan Martinez/Reuters]© Dylan Martinez/Reuters A pro-Brexit protester brandishes a sign near pro-Europe demonstrators outside the Houses of Parliament [Dylan Martinez/Reuters] The university's Policy Institute found that 55 per cent of Britons aged 18-75 said they "very strongly" identify with their Leave or Remain Brexit affiliation - up from 44 per cent last year.

It comes during the closing stages of a bitter general election campaign, in which the UK's departure from the EU has been the central focus.

In contrast, just over a fifth said they very strongly identify with their political party of choice.

Professor Bobby Duffy, director of the Policy Institute, said it was evidence that the electorate's views on Brexit were continuing to trump party affiliation.

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They are now more important than party allegiance in some cases. This goes beyond Brexit . Socially conservative voters – many of whom self- identify as working-class and tend to hold fewer formal qualifications – who are concerned about cultural identity , national security, and value a

Three days before the election, many voters are struggling to find a party that offers what they More than three years on from the referendum, the likes of Mark, Chioma, Claire and Leslie (left to right For Mark, a Leave voter , Brexit is the most important issue. "Who is going to get Brexit done so

Prime Minister Boris Johnson will be hoping the evidence bears out in Thursday's general election, as he looks to take down Labour's "red wall" of constituencies across the Midlands and the north of England.

Boris Johnson wearing a suit and tie: Boris Johnson hoping to secure a win in this week's general election.© Independent Digital News & Media Limited Boris Johnson hoping to secure a win in this week's general election. He is hoping that traditional Labour supporters in Leave-voting seats such as Great Grimsby and West Bromwich East will put their desire to see Brexit done before their party affiliation.

The data also unearthed negative feelings between party supporters and those backing rival parties.

Asked, on a scale of 0-100 - with zero being as cold as possible and 100 being warm - how they consider the other party, Labour supporters gave Conservatives just 15 out of 100 and Tories gave Labour a score of 18.

"These findings provide more evidence for the idea that British politics has changed dramatically in recent years," Prof Duffy said.

"People's Brexit identities have got stronger and continue to trump party affiliations, while our views of people on the 'other side' of political debates have become very negative."

The findings were produced after conducting surveys with more than 2,000 adults aged 18-75 between November 27 and 29.

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