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World China banned live animal sales in Wuhan, after a food market selling wolves and civet cats was linked to a deadly virus

22:35  22 january  2020
22:35  22 january  2020 Source:   msn.com

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a person standing in front of a building© NOEL CELIS/AFP via Getty Images

    The Chinese city of Wuhan, the epicenter of a deadly coronavirus outbreak, has banned the trade of live animals at food markets after one location was linked to the spread of the disease.

    Police in the central Chinese city were conducting checks to ensure that the rule was enforced by the city's roughly 11 million residents, the BBC said Wednesday, citing state media reports.

    The move comes after the Huanan Seafood Market in Wuhan was shuttered on January 1, after it was believed to be the starting point for the outbreak of 2019-nCov, also known as the Wuhan virus.

    Before its closure, the market was selling an array of unusual animals for food, including young wolves and civet cats, which experts believe could play a part in the spread of disease.

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      China warned the deadly Wuhan virus is 'mutating' and could spread further, with over 2,000 people tested after being close to those infected China is warning that the mysterious Wuhan virus is mutating, meaning it could spread further and being harder to control. 440 people have now been identified as infected in China, and killed nine people, while cases have been reported in other countries. The director-general of China's Centre for Disease Control and Prevention said that the virus is adapting and mutating - making it harder to manage and control.China's National Health Commission said 2,197 people have identified as having been in close contact with people who have the virus, and 1,394 of these are still under observation.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    So far, the disease has killed at least nine people and infected over 440 others.

    The virus has also been transmitted in other Chinese cities, including Beijing and Shenzhen, as well as to South Korea, Thailand, Japan, and the US.

    "The evidence is highly suggestive that the outbreak is associated with exposures in one seafood market in Wuhan," the World Health Organization said in a statement.

    The Huanan Seafood Market is considered to be a "wet market," or a place that traditionally sells dead and live animals along with other produce and goods for consumption.

    Concerns about poor hygiene at these markets have been raised before, and it is possible that the virus first jumped from animal to human via meat for sale there.

    A 61-year-old man was the first person to die from the virus. According to Bloomberg, he was a regular shopper at the Huanan Seafood Market.

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      This terrifying graph shows how fast the Wuhan virus has spread so far, and how close it is to becoming a global pandemic A simple graph shows just how fast the Wuhan coronavirus has spread over the last two weeks alone. The graph shows that the virus - also known as 2019-nCoV - could soon become a pandemic, as more and more cases are being found outside China. As of Wednesday, nine people have died and 440 are infected worldwide, according to China's health commission. Click here for Business Insider's full coverage of the Wuhan virus.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.An alarming graph shows how fast the Wuhan coronavirus has spread in the past two weeks alone and highlights how soon it could become a pandemic.

    Wet markets are a breeding ground for disease a person holding a baby© Felix Wong/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

    The Huanan Seafood Market advertised a variety of live animals, including dogs, peacocks, otters, camels, and koalas, according to The South China Morning Post.

    Photos posted to social media also suggest the market was selling live wolf pups and civet cats, both of which are eaten in China.

    These types of markets are popular around China and can be found in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, and Shandong Province.

    They can also be breeding grounds for viruses.

    Market at centre of deadly coronavirus sold exotic animals to eat

      Market at centre of deadly coronavirus sold exotic animals to eat The 'wet' market identified as the epicentre of China's deadly coronavirus outbreak sold a range of exotic animals for human consumption, including snakes, foxes, wolf cubs and snakes. The flu-like virus has so far killed 17 people and infected more than 570, with cases surfacing in the US, Japan, South Korea and Thailand.Many of the infected people worked or lived near Huanan Wholesale Seafood Market in Wuhan, reports the South China Morning Post. require(["inlineoutstreamAd", "c.

    The H7N9 and H5N9 Bird flu were likely transmitted to humans via direct contact with infected poultry at a live bird market in China, according to WHO. The diseases killed a collective 1,000 people globally.

    And SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, which killed over 700 people on the planet between 2002 and 2003, is also SARS, is also believed to have mutated while spreading through the wet animal markets.

    Wang Yuedan, a professor of immunology at Peking University's School of Basic Medical Sciences, told Bloomberg that China's preference for fresh and exotic meat "does make China susceptible to the risk of new virus outbreaks through close animal and human contact."

    "The same is true for Ebola, which came about as a result of eating animals from the forest in Africa," he said.

    One chart shows how the Wuhan coronavirus compares to other major outbreaks and pandemics in the last 50 years .
    A coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China, has killed at least 170 people and infected more than 8,000. Coronaviruses are zoonotic diseases, meaning they can pass from animals to humans. Both this virus and SARS likely originated in bats, then jumped to people. In the last 50 years, at least 10 infectious diseases have jumped from animals to people. Here's how the Wuhan coronavirus compares to other major outbreaks. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Since December 31, the Wuhan coronavirus has killed at least 170 people and infected more than 8,000 across 20 countries, including the US.

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