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World A majority of Americans say the anger that led to protests against the police killing of George Floyd is 'fully justified'

23:21  03 june  2020
23:21  03 june  2020 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

Minnesota Gov. activates the National Guard after days of protests and looting in response to the police custody death of George Floyd

  Minnesota Gov. activates the National Guard after days of protests and looting in response to the police custody death of George Floyd The Governor of Minnesota Tim Walz said Thursday: 'I declare a peacetime emergency in the City of Minneapolis, the City of St. Paul, and surrounding communities.'Tim Walz released the following statement on Thursday: 'By the authority vested in me by the Constitution and applicable statutes, do hereby issue this Executive Order: On May 27, 2020, George Floyd died while in custody of the Minneapolis Police Department. Our state watched Mr. Floyd's humanity be erased.

a group of people standing around a fire: Protesters stand in front of the burning Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct building on May 28 in Minnesota. Protesters stand in front of the burning Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct building on May 28 in Minnesota.
  • A majority of Americans say the anger that led to nationwide protests against police violence is "fully justified," according to a poll from the Monmouth University Polling Institute.
  • The poll, published Tuesday, also found that most Americans (57%) believe that police are more likely to use excessive force against a black person than a white person.
  • Other results indicate a still-present rift between black and white Americans.
  • Black Americans are more likely than white Americans to support protesters' anger - and destructive protest tactics.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

Some 57% of Americans said the anger that led to nationwide protests against police brutality is "fully justified," according to a poll published Tuesday.

Michelle Obama's plea after George Floyd's death: 'A heartbreak that never seems to stop'

  Michelle Obama's plea after George Floyd's death: 'A heartbreak that never seems to stop' Obama went on to mention Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, as well as Eric Garner, Sandra Bland and Michael Brown. "It just goes on, and on, and on. Race and racism is a reality that so many of us grow up learning to just deal with."The lawyer and author then issued a plea for "everyone", regardless of race, to help root out racism."[I]f we ever hope to move past it, it can't just be on people of colour to deal with it. It's up to all of us—Black, white, everyone—no matter how well-meaning we think we might be, to do the honest, uncomfortable work of rooting it out," she continued.

Results from the Monmouth University Polling Institute poll, conducted from May 28 through June 1, indicate broad shifts in how Americans understand the nature of racism and police violence. Just 18% of respondents said protesters' anger was "not at all justified."

57% per cent of respondents also said American police are more likely to use excessive force in "a difficult or dangerous situation" against a black person. A third of respondents said police were equally likely to use excessive force against a white person in such a situation.

American police kill an average 2.8 men each day, a 2018 study found, and black men are up to four times more likely than whites to be killed by police. Roughly one in 1,000 black men will be killed by police "over the life course," another study found.

Truck driver arrested after appearing to drive into protesters

  Truck driver arrested after appearing to drive into protesters Footage shows a tanker truck approaching at a high speed as George Floyd protesters in Minneapolis try to frantically get out of the way.Footage shows a tanker truck approaching the throng of protesters at a high speed, as protesters frantically try to avoid being hit. The truck slowly stops and is then surrounded by protesters who pull open both the driver and passenger doors. The State Police said there was no immediate word of injuries.

a group of people holding a sign: Protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in New York Protest against the death in Minneapolis police custody of George Floyd, in New York

The views from the latest poll mark a shift in how Americans think about police violence. In a poll taken after the police shooting of Alton Sterling in 2016, just 34% said police were more likely to use excessive force against black culprits, while 52% said it was just as likely that such force would be used against white culprits. In December 2014, following the acquittal of a New York City police officer who held Eric Garner in a chokehold, just 33% said excessive force by police was more likely to happen against black culprits.

"It seems we have reached a turning point in public opinion where white Americans are realising that black Americans face risks when dealing with police that they do not," Patrick Murray, director of Monmouth's polling institute, said in a statement.

Though white Americans may be reckoning more deeply than ever with the country's racist police violence, they do not universally condone protesters' more disruptive tactics.

On the spot where George Floyd died, his brother urges calm

  On the spot where George Floyd died, his brother urges calm Chants of “What's his name? George Floyd!” filled the air Monday as a large crowd gathered at the spot where the black man who became the latest symbol of racial injustice in America lay dying as a white police officer pressed his knee into his neck. Wearing a face mask with George’s Floyd's image on it, his brother Terrence Floyd dropped to his knees at the storefront that has been turned into a memorial covered with flowers and signs. As he kneeled silently, many who were around him joined him on the ground.

After protesters burned down the Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct in Minnesota, just 17% of respondents said the action was "fully justified." Another 37% said it was "partially justified."

Black Americans are more likely than white Americans to support the protesters' anger and tactics

Sixty-nine per cent of black Americans say the protesters' anger is "fully justified," wheras 55% of white Americans say the same.

Twenty-seven per cent of black Americans say the protesters' actions are "fully justified," and just 15% of white Americans say the same.

"White Americans (45%) are much more likely than black Americans (21%) and Americans of other minority groups (30%) to say [the actions] are not at all justified," the poll found.

The gap between the number of black and white Americans who support disruptive tactics could indicate significant differences between how black and white Americans understand the severity of police violence.

"When people feel helpless, like there is nothing left to lose, like their lives already hang in the balance, a wild, swirling, undirected rage is a logical result," opinion columnist Charles Blow wrote in the New York Times.

Mayweather to pay for George Floyd's funeral services

  Mayweather to pay for George Floyd's funeral services Unbeaten American boxing legend Floyd Mayweather has committed to paying for all of George Floyd's funeral costs.Floyd – an African-American man – died in Minneapolis after a police officer was filmed kneeling on his neck during an arrest on Monday.

"You destroy people's prospects, they will destroy your property."

  • Read more:
  • Voices captured on an NYC police scanner can be heard saying protesters should be shot and run over
  • The George Floyd demonstrations have led to a cycle of violence between cops and protesters. Experts say only a shift in policing itself can end it.
  • New York City cops sat watching as looters ransacked stores in Manhattan
  • Police have arrested more than 4,200 people nationwide in protests following George Floyd's death
  • 'They gonna blame that on us': Videos show white protesters smashing windows and defacing stores as black protesters tell them they're endangering black lives

Black Lives Matter is six years old, but many founding members say these protests feel different .
The Black Lives Matter movement was born during the 2014 protests against the killing of an unarmed teenager. Six years on, the streets are once again filled with Americans demanding justice. But activists say there is reason to hope for change.He was one of thousands who flocked to the town of Ferguson, Missouri in the sweltering August of 2014 to voice outrage over a white police officer's fatal killing of an unarmed black man named Michael Brown.

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