•   
  •   

World Clown' Gavin Williamson is savaged by British press over exams 'farce'

13:43  18 august  2020
13:43  18 august  2020 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

A-level results day as confusion continues over grading and appeal process

  A-level results day as confusion continues over grading and appeal process Hundreds of thousands of students will receive their A-level and vocational qualifications today, as the fallout continues over how they are to be graded. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson said on Wednesday that he wouldn't apologise for the last-minute change to the system in England.Gavin Williamson said students would benefit by being allowed to use their best results from mock exams, or a moderated system or by taking exams in October."I won't apologise for the fact we want to make these changes because we do think they'll benefit young people," he said.

Gavin Williamson was today savaged over the A-level and GCSE exams ' farce ' by the British press which called for the Education Secretary to be sacked and described him as a ' clown '. The Daily Mail used the headline 'Another fine mess', with a cartoon of Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Mr

Gavin Williamson was today savaged over the A-level and GCSE exams ' farce ' by the British press which called for the Education Secretary to be sacked and described him as a ' clown '. The Daily Mail used the headline 'Another fine mess', with a cartoon of Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Mr

Gavin Williamson was today savaged over the A-level and GCSE exams 'farce' by the British press which called for the Education Secretary to be sacked and described him as a 'clown'.

The Daily Mail used the headline 'Another fine mess', with a cartoon of Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Mr Williamson as Laurel and Hardy, saying it was a 'humiliating climbdown' for the Education Secretary.

Politics expert Tim Bale said the last time a front page mocked up a PM and a high-profile minister as the duo with 'Another Fine Mess' as the headline was John Major and Norman Lamont after Black Wednesday in 1992.

Student anger grows over A-levels as date set for appeals process to begin

  Student anger grows over A-levels as date set for appeals process to begin Students have pledged to hold the government to account over the A-level results row, with thousands left disappointed by their grades told they will be able to start submitting appeals from Monday. Around 280,000 students saw their grades fall by one grade or more following the introduction of a new algorithm, which was put in place after the coronavirus lockdown led to exams being cancelled.But students have been left furious by the new system, with many losing their places on their chosen courses after not meeting the required grades.

Gavin Williamson has tried to lay the blame for the exams fiasco at the door of the regulator Ofqual after a humiliating climbdown that overturned up to Explaining the decision on Monday, Williamson claimed he had only become aware “ over the Saturday and Sunday” of the scale of the problems with

GAVIN WILLIAMSON is under mounting pressure to resolve the exam crisis in England after hundreds of thousands of students had their A-level exam Over the weekend guidance for students looking to appeal their results was removed shortly after being published online – leaving thousands of young

The Daily Star published a mock advertisement for the Education Secretary, saying: 'Are you a moron who couldn't organise a booze up in a brewery?' along with the hashtag #PromotedBeyondHisCompetence.

The Times told how Jonathan Slater, permanent secretary at the Department for Education, could be ousted over the chaos - but Mr Johnson has 'no intention' of sacking Mr Williamson and 'expressed confidence' in him.

Meanwhile the Guardian said the decision 'followed days of mounting anger among Conservative MPs and alarm among students', adding that the climbdown will overturn 2.3million A-level grades.

The Telegraph went in on how Mr Williamson blamed Ofqual for the chaos, and that his announcement on the dramatic U-turn yesterday 'came after 24 hours of mounting pressure from Tory backbenchers'.

How other countries in Europe held their exams

  How other countries in Europe held their exams Like many European countries, Britain cancelled student exams due to the coronavirus pandemic. © Other To calculate results, teachers were asked to submit the grades they thought each student would have achieved to exam boards and to rank their pupils in order. Data points for each student were then put through a statistical model, including the school's previous performance.

Coronavirus latest news: Nail bars, outdoor pools and beauty salons to reopen in Leicester as lockdown measures eased. Ross Harding: Dido Harding's rise is an egregious example of the chumocracy at work. Chaos as Oxbridge faces having to let down over 1,500 students.

Gavin Williamson says he is "incredibly sorry for the distress" caused to pupils after having to make a U-turn in how A-levels and GCSEs are graded. The education secretary refused to say if he will resign amid a fresh scramble to secure university places.

The Sun gave the Government an F grade for Farce, saying that A = Anger, B = Balls-Up, C = Chaos, D = Dunces, E = Errors and U = U-turn. The newspaper also told how yesterday's U-turn followed an 'outpouring of fury'.

The Express called the U-turn a 'victory for common sense' and said it followed a ''deafening outcry'. The newspaper also said youngsters were 'relieved' by the decision and described it as a 'dramatic turnaround'.

It comes as a major U-turn by the Government will see tens of thousands of A-level students in England receive increased grades, with Mr Williamson apologising for the distress caused by the debacle.

Following criticism from students and headteachers and complaints from dozens of Tory MPs, grades will now be based on teachers' assessments rather than a controversial algorithm devised by regulator Ofqual.

The PM and Mr Williamson had previously defended the 'robust' system, which saw almost 40 per cent of grades reduced from teachers' predictions. The change will also apply to GCSE results in England on Thursday.

Exams U-turn fixes a political problem for the government but creates many more practical ones

  Exams U-turn fixes a political problem for the government but creates many more practical ones This is a U-turn long in the making but short in the offing. © Other As recently as Saturday night, government sources were insisting that, without standardisation, they would be fighting accusations of rampant grade inflation and worthless A-levels. © Getty Education Secretary Gavin Williamson may be fearing for his job after the U-turn Ultimately though, the alternative was worse.A barrage of stories about talented students from disadvantaged backgrounds marked down on the basis of historical difficulties in their schools.Inequalities exacerbated by an algorithm.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson says the UK got a Covid vaccine first because it is "a much better country". The education secretary is asked about reports that he offered his resignation to the prime minister over the handling of exam grades in England.

GAVIN WILLIAMSON has apologised to students with a statement in the House of Commons as the Education Secretary said he is 'deeply sorry'. Gavin Williamson has apologised to students again for the exam chaos in August due to a failure in the Ofqual system.

Read more

Coronavirus: Gavin Williamson makes schools home tests promise .
The Government has stepped up its efforts to persuade parents to send their children back to the classroom in September.Mr Williamson also insisted schools will only close following local outbreaks as an 'absolute last resort'.

usr: 0
This is interesting!