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World Who is Jovita Idár? Google Doodle Celebrates Mexican-American Civil Rights Pioneer

14:31  21 september  2020
14:31  21 september  2020 Source:   newsweek.com

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Today’s Doodle celebrates Mexican - American journalist, educator, nurse, and activist Jovita Idár , a pioneer in the fight for Mexican - American civil rights at the turn of the 20th century. During the First Mexican Congress, which met the week of September 14 to 22 in 1911

Jovita Idár was a Mexican - American journalist, activist, suffragist, teacher, and nurse. According to the National Women’s History Museum, “she single-handedly protected her newspaper headquarters when the Texas Rangers came to shut it down and crossed the border to serve as a nurse during the

Jovita Idár, a Mexican-American civil rights pioneer, is celebrated in today's Google Doodle on the anniversary of the week the First Mexican Congress was held, September 14 to 22, 1911. © Google Doodle Jovita Idár, a Mexican-American civil rights pioneer, is celebrated in today's Google Doodle on the anniversary of the week the First Mexican Congress was held, September 14 to 22, 1911.

Jovita Idár, a pioneer of Mexican-American civil rights, is celebrated in today's Google Doodle, on the anniversary of the week the First Mexican Congress was held, September 14—22, 1911.

Born in the border city of Laredo, Texas, in 1885, Jovita Idár lived at a time when Mexican-Americans faced rampant discrimination.

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Google is celebrating Mexican - American journalist, educator, nurse and activist Jovita Idár with a new Doodle . Idár encountered Texas Rangers who came to shut down newspaper El Progreso in 1914 after she criticized the U.S. army's involvement in the Mexican Revolution.

Google today dedicates a beautiful doodle to Jovita Idár , a Mexican - American journalist, educator The Idár family were part of the gente decente, whose families had better access to good education Jovita Idár commenced writing for El Progreso newspaper in 1914. Never afraid to make her voice

But Idár was determined to stand up for her community, so became a teacher in 1903, later resigning due to the segregation and the poor conditions that Mexican-American students faced.

Idár then joined her father's influential activist newspaper, La Crónica (The Chronicle). In her articles, Idár wrote about the discrimination they faced, fought for women's suffrage, and affirmed the importance of Mexican culture.

In 1911, Idár and her family helped establish the First Mexican Congress to organize Mexican-Americans across Texas in the fight for their civil rights.

Idár then founded the feminist organization League of Mexican Women and served as its president. The groundbreaking organization united women around the educational, social, and political issues facing the Mexican-American community.

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Google on Monday celebrated Mexican - American journalist, educator, nurse and activist Jovita Idár with a Doodle on its homepage. Idar , who was born in Texas in 1885, was known for speaking out against discrimination, fighting for women's suffrage and affirming the importance of Mexican culture.

Jovita Idar frequently wrote about the challenges Mexican Americans faced in Texas, where signs that announced “No Negroes, Mexicans or dogs As president of the League of Mexican Women, Jovita Idar focused on education and helping the poor. But she also was keeping an eye on what was

Then, Idár headed to Mexico to take care of the injured during the Mexican Revolution, serving as a nurse before joining La Cruz Blanca, a group similar to the Red Cross.

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CIVIL RIGHTS PIONEER . MARIA Rebecca Latigo de Hernandez was a civil rights leader whose outstanding work in fighting for Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants lives on to the present day. Who was Alexandre Dumas? Google Doodle celebrates French author. Broke the mould.

Google is honoring Mexican American civil rights leader María Rebecca Latigo de Hernández on her birthday with a new Doodle . Born in Garza García, Mexico, Hernández later moved to San Antonio, Texas, where she spent most of her life speaking on behalf of women and children of Mexican

In 1914, Idár continued her journalism career at El Progreso (The Progress) newspaper, where she criticized the U.S. army's involvement in the Mexican Revolution.

This resulted in the Texas Rangers attempting to shut the newspaper down, but when the officers rode up to the office, Idár stood in their way, forcing them to turn back. This powerful scene is recreated in today's Google Doodle, which sees Idár in a stand-off against the rangers, as she guards the newspaper.

However, the rangers returned the next day and shut down the El Progreso. Idár refused to be silenced though and returned to La Crónica, eventually running the paper with her brothers and using it as a platform in her pursuit for justice.

In 1917, Idár and her husband moved to San Antonio, Texas where she became a leader of the city's community. She opened a free kindergarten, worked as a Spanish translator at a hospital, and taught childcare and feminine hygiene. Women's education was especially important for Idár, who often said: "Educate a woman and you educate a family."

In relation to today's doodle, Google says: "Gracias, Jovita Idár, for dedicating your life to the pursuit of equality and justice."

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- 02:32. Google honors Puerto Rican civil rights pioneer Felicitas Mendez. She married Mexican immigrant and fellow field worker Gonzalo Mendez in 1935, and together they opened a bar and grill and managed a 40-acre asparagus farm in Westminster after the Japanese- American owners were

Google wrote: Today’s Doodle celebrates what would have been the 122nd birthday of María Rebecca Latigo de Hernández, a civil rights leader integral to advancing Mexican American and Mexican immigrant rights . Born in Garza García, near Monterrey, Mexico in 1896, Hernández later

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