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World How to Keep a Fall Surge From Becoming a Winter Catastrophe

15:10  12 october  2020
15:10  12 october  2020 Source:   theatlantic.com

These 3 braid hairstyles are all the rage now in winter!

 These 3 braid hairstyles are all the rage now in winter! © Provided by WUNDERWEIB These three braid hairstyles are very popular in winter 2020 A braid is probably the easiest and fastest hairstyle in everyday life. But to add a bit of variety to the classic ponytail, we have three beautiful braid hairstyles for you that are absolutely trendy this winter. In winter our hair is statically charged extremely quickly due to the heating air. That's why we love to wear braids in the cold months. But wearing a ponytail every day can get boring over time.

Do you know what SHTF is? A little reading and a few economical purchases of everyday items can save your life after a catastrophe . In order to not fall victim to reactive actions, you’ll need to understand what happens when SHTF goes down.

Ecological catastrophe at the Kamchatka peninsula. Knowing how the system works and how these kinds of questions are getting hushed, we must do everything in our power to save the ocean right Fish looks like it’s been boiled. Even the strongest shells that could tear a diving suit fell off the rocks.

  How to Keep a Fall Surge From Becoming a Winter Catastrophe © Getty / The Atlantic

COVID-19 cases are rising in parts of New York City, and the mayor is threatening business and school closures. Across other parts of the United States and Western Europe, outbreaks are spiraling out of control. President Donald Trump is comparing the coronavirus pandemic to the seasonal flu on Twitter.

What month is this again? Hundreds of thousands of deaths since the pandemic began in March, we seem to be right back where we started, like passengers trapped on a demonic carousel.

These 3 braid hairstyles are now very popular in winter!

 These 3 braid hairstyles are now very popular in winter! © Provided by WUNDERWEIB These three braid hairstyles are very popular in winter 2020 A braid is probably the easiest and fastest hairstyle in everyday life. But to add a bit of variety to the classic ponytail, we have three beautiful braid hairstyles for you that are absolutely trendy this winter. In winter, our hair is statically charged extremely quickly due to the heating air. That's why we love to wear braids in the cold months. But wearing a ponytail every day can get boring over time.

‘Field Notes From a Catastrophe ’. By Elizabeth Kolbert. It became too dangerous to hunt using snowmobiles, and the men switched to boats. The panel members weren't sure how long it would take for changes already set in motion to become manifest, mainly because the climate system has a

Home/Backpacking Skills/Advanced Backpacking Skills/Annoying Gear Failures: How to Prevent I never carry one, so I just suck it up and keep wearing torn hiking pants as is until I get home. I’ve had pump water filters clog, crack, otherwise become useless. At the time I carried iodine as backup and

Everything could still get worse. This week, Anthony Fauci warned of a new surge in cases, as Americans move from the virus-dispersing outdoors into more crowded and less-ventilated public spaces in colder months.

Or everything could get better. Thanks largely to new treatments and more knowledge about this virus, hospitalization-fatality rates have declined across Europe and the United States. As a result, new surges are less likely to re-create the springtime spike in deaths. Individuals are also far more conscientious and alert to the risks.

[Read: How we survive the winter]

To build on these new advantages, American and European citizens have to embrace both empiricism and imperfection. Thinking empirically means paying attention to the collective findings of scientific experts, rather than relying on partisan cues (But the president says …) or the behavior of our friends (But my friends don’t care about …). We also have to be prepared to accept less-than-perfect solutions, such as rapid tests and masks, to bring society to a sustainable equilibrium of normalcy, rather than toggle between draconian lockdowns and ruinous free-for-alls for another year. A silver bullet may be months away, or longer. But bronze bullets abound.

Corona winter: is Friluftsliv the new hygge?

 Corona winter: is Friluftsliv the new hygge? © Provided by shop window Little sunlight and cold temperatures make it difficult for many people to enjoy winter even under normal circumstances. In times of the coronavirus pandemic, well-being is all the more important. In addition to the Danish concept of Hygge, which focuses entirely on comfort, you can also learn a lot from the Norwegian lifestyle, Friluftsliv.

What tools and concepts do climate, health and security authorities rely on to evaluate potential crises? An anthropologist of science and medicine asks how

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America’s fall surge seems chaotic and scattershot, like every chapter of this pandemic. In the U.S., it is concentrated in the Midwest and northern Plains, especially in the Dakotas, Montana, and Wisconsin.

COVID-19’s resurgence isn’t just happening in America. Infections are now rising in Spain, France, and the United Kingdom—all of which currently have more new daily cases per capita than the U.S. This summer, it seemed as if America’s COVID-19 response was uniquely horrific and embarrassing. Today, the group of embarrassed countries is more crowded.

In France, where cases have reached a record high since widespread testing began, bars in Paris have been ordered to close for several weeks. In the U.K., where new cases are up eightfold since August, The New York Times has reported that pubs are packed and that supermarket aisles are filled with mask-free shoppers. In Spain, Madrid residents have been asked to not leave the city, and leaders are blaming the party habits of young people.

America’s newest wave of Covid-19 cases, explained

  America’s newest wave of Covid-19 cases, explained Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations are up across the country. More deaths are likely to follow.America is now averaging nearly 48,000 new confirmed cases every day, the highest numbers since mid-August, according to the Covid Tracking Project. More than 34,500 Americans are currently hospitalized with Covid-19 in the US, up from less than 30,000 a week ago. Nearly 700 new deaths are being reported on average every day, too — and while that is down from August, when there were often more than 1,000 deaths a day, deaths are going to eventually start increasing if cases and hospitalizations continue to rise. It’s a pattern we have seen before.

You wake and suddenly you're no longer on the plane! But what are your chances and how do you increase your odds of surviving a fall from the cruising

Sales of works by ancient Roman Marcus Aurelius have seen a sharp uptick in recent months. Which makes calm sense.

Spain’s outbreak, the worst of the bunch, carries a valuable lesson for other countries and metros experiencing the fall surge. When the nation’s lockdown ended in June, cases started to increase almost immediately, like water spewing out of an unblocked hose. By September, Spain was declaring more new confirmed COVID-19 cases per capita than the U.S. did at the peak of its summer outbreak. In lieu of deciding on a durable strategy, Spain merely swapped one unsustainable plan, lockdown, for another, uncontrolled outbreaks.

The outlook isn’t so dire globally, however. Countries with fewer than 50 coronavirus deaths per 1 million residents include Indonesia (40), Australia (35), Japan (13), South Korea (8), and Vietnam and Taiwan (both under 0.5). This “under-50” group notably includes almost no large countries in Europe or the Americas, whose most populous nations have suffered far more fatalities as a share of residents. In the U.S., the U.K., Spain, Italy, Mexico, and Brazil, deaths per million sit roughly between 600 and 700.

[Read: How the pandemic revealed Britain’s national illness]

The Third Coronavirus Surge Has Arrived

  The Third Coronavirus Surge Has Arrived This week’s COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations make clear that the U.S. is once again sinking deeper into the pandemic.Since last Wednesday, states reported 4,796 COVID-19 deaths, an increase of about 3 percent over the previous week. Since the start of the pandemic we have typically seen reported deaths lag behind reported cases by three to four weeks, although reporting delays seem to have worsened in some states, including Florida and Texas.

Keep an eye on Susie and Sam! 17. “See how high the hornet’s nest, ‘twill tell how high the snow will rest.” We have had an abundance of acorns dropping here in Bucks County, Pennsylvania starting early fall . My dad remarks he can’t remember the last time his 30-year old oak dropped so profusely.

Staking a plant keeps it safe in windy conditions, which is especially important if your area is prone to strong winds on a regular basis. Another way to prevent a sunflower from falling over is to create a mound around the base of the plant. Mounding is done by putting topsoil or composted manure


Video: Dr. Fauci: 'No doubt' coronavirus far more serious than seasonal flu (MSNBC)

What’s so special about the most successful COVID-19 responses? The honest answer is that we can’t be sure yet. In the coming years, we may learn that the good outcomes across Africa and East Asia were mostly the result of Vitamin D levels, or age distributions, or immunity conferred from exposure to other coronaviruses. More likely, however, is that they got the response right because they understood a certain story about how this virus operates:

COVID-19 is airborne, overdispersed, and often asymptomatic. That means it spreads mostly through tiny spray droplets commonly produced by people talking loudly in crowded, unventilated spaces over long periods, leading to “super-spreading” clusters—where one sick person infects many healthy people—that account for a large share of total infections. Infected people without symptoms might also be super-spreaders.

This is a relatively simple story, and in all likelihood, it’s incomplete. But it contains several lessons that can help countries and communities avoid an even worse fall surge, right now.

From South Korea: Fewer lockdowns—but more masks and tracing

Many Western countries have responded to COVID-19 outbreaks by immediately shutting down as much of society as is feasible. This approach is economically catastrophic in the short term, unsustainable in the long term, and possibly unnecessary in any term—if the authorities respond swiftly with other measures. South Korea had an extremely successful COVID-19 response, and it never adopted widespread lockdowns. Rather, it used a combination of universal mask wearing, limits on crowds, contract tracing to quickly identify potentially infected individuals, and quarantine or isolation guidance to keep the sick and potentially sick away from healthy people.

Dark déjà vu for European economy as virus cases spike

  Dark déjà vu for European economy as virus cases spike LONDON (AP) — Europe’s economy was just catching its breath from what had been the sharpest recession in modern history. A resurgence in coronavirus cases this month is a bitter blow that will likely turn what was meant to be a period of healing for the economy into a lean winter of job losses and bankruptcies. Bars, restaurants, airlines and myriad other businesses are getting hit with new restrictions as politicians desperately try to contain an increase in infection cases that is rapidly filling up hospitals.The height of the pandemic last spring had caused the economy of the 19 countries that use the euro to plunge by a massive 11.

“We were never on lockdown,” Paul Choi, a consultant who lives in Seoul, told me. Instead, South Korea focused its closures on places like bars and nightclubs, where crowding was inevitable, and encouraged universal mask wearing. “Almost everybody is wearing masks,” Choi said. “If you don’t wear masks, you get looks on the street.”

[Derek Thompson: What’s behind South Korea’s COVID-19 exceptionalism?]

The objection to masks in the U.S. (besides itchiness and tyranny) is that they’re crude, misused, and unproven in randomized-control trials. This much is true: Masks aren’t perfect. But their imperfection is often enough to make this disease less likely to spread—and less severe for those who get it. A new research preprint estimates that when an infected person and a non-infected person both wear masks, that can reduce the chance of transmission by up to 80 percent compared with a scenario where neither is masked. Joshua T. Schiffer, an infectious-disease researcher at the University of Washington who co-wrote the study, found that if the healthy masked individual is infected, her viral dosage is slashed by a factor of 10. This reduces the likelihood that she develops a severe case of COVID-19. A larger body of research finds that masks reduce the spread of aerosolized diseases like COVID-19.

From Vietnam: The benefits of clear and accurate public-health communication

The Trump administration’s consistent lying on issues including, but by no means limited to, the pandemic has created a vacuum of institutional trust at the very moment it is most necessary.

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Vietnam offers a particularly vivid example of what candid public-health communication might look like. Its Ministry of Health first alerted citizens to the threat of an outbreak during the second week of January. In February, its National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health released a song—“Ghen Co Vy,” meaning “Jealous Coronavirus”—that advocated for social distancing and hand-washing. In April, the country imposed a fine on people who posted “false, untruthful, or distorted” information on social media. “This messaging engendered a community spirit in which every citizen felt inspired to do their part, whether that was wearing a mask in public or enduring weeks of quarantine,” a team of health and economic researchers from Vietnam and Oxford wrote in an essay summarizing the country’s response to the virus. To date, the nation of 95 million has an official COVID-19 death count of 35, which is roughly the number of Americans who die of this disease every hour and a half.

From Japan: Open schools, but do it safely

Many cities have refused to open public schools, for fear that doing so will trigger a mass outbreak, and still others—including Boston—are delaying in-person instruction as positivity rates rise. As a result, America’s pandemic is becoming an education and family crisis, one that is particularly devastating for low-income and minority children—and their parents. One nationwide survey co-sponsored by the Associated Press found that just one in four Black and Hispanic students has access to in-person instruction. As K-12 education, or some crude approximation of it, becomes a stay-at-home affair, parents are being pulled out of the workforce to serve as teachers. No surprise, the school-closing pandemic is mostly a tax on working mothers. Married women lost almost 1 million jobs last month, while overall employment surged.

Scotland extends coronavirus restrictions as nation heads for new tiered system

  Scotland extends coronavirus restrictions as nation heads for new tiered system Coronavirus restrictions in Scotland are being extended for another week, taking the nation into a new tiered system. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said details of the new system will be published on Friday and the measures will be implemented from 2 November.Restrictions put in place two weeks ago on hospitality businesses had been due to end on 25 October.The measures have also forced the closure of snooker and pool halls, indoor bowling, casinos and bingo halls in the central belt.

America can’t go back to normal without school. But Americans don’t have to choose between health and education, or between health and parental sanity. Japan’s example proves that.

After containing the spread of the virus—more or less the same way South Korea did—it worked to virus-proof the classroom, as much as possible. In Japan, where most schools are back in session, schools have largely avoided outbreaks by enforcing universal mask wearing, encouraging kids to socially distance, and installing cheap plastic shields to interrupt the flow of aerosolized particles between students. Using advanced computer models, Japanese researchers have demonstrated that cracking open a window and a door on opposite sides of a temperature-controlled room can properly ventilate a class with dozens of students. Masks, distancing, and ventilation: Yes, it might really be that simple.

[Read: These 8 basic steps will let us reopen schools]

Beating a pandemic is sometimes compared to a war, which brings to mind total sacrifice to defeat an evil enemy. But the problem with the war analogy is that it conjures a kind of all-or-nothing approach to virus mitigation. The West could dramatically improve its lot if it adopted a small number of measures to defeat the virus that are empirical, imperfect, and just enough.

Scotland extends coronavirus restrictions as nation heads for new tiered system .
Coronavirus restrictions in Scotland are being extended for another week, taking the nation into a new tiered system. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said details of the new system will be published on Friday and the measures will be implemented from 2 November.Restrictions put in place two weeks ago on hospitality businesses had been due to end on 25 October.The measures have also forced the closure of snooker and pool halls, indoor bowling, casinos and bingo halls in the central belt.

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