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World This Day in History: Oct. 23

08:20  23 october  2020
08:20  23 october  2020 Source:   foxnews.com

Asia Today: Sydney lifts quarantine for N. Zealand travelers

  Asia Today: Sydney lifts quarantine for N. Zealand travelers SYDNEY (AP) — Australia’s largest city Sydney lifted quarantine restrictions on travelers from New Zealand on Friday while the second largest city, Melbourne, marked the 100th day of one of the world’s longest pandemic lockdowns. More than 350 passengers are scheduled to take three flights from Auckland on Friday and will not have to undergo hotel quarantine on arrival in Sydney. New South Wales state Premier Gladys Berejiklian said: “This is great news for tourism. It’s also great news for family reunification and grateful businesses.”New Zealand will continue to insist that travelers from Australia quarantine in hotels for 14 days on arrival.

On this day , Oct . 23 … 1987: The U.S. Senate rejects, 58-42, the Supreme Court nomination of Robert H. Bork. 1973: President Richard Nixon agrees to turn over White House tape recordings subpoenaed by the Watergate special prosecutor to Judge John J. Sirica.

Today in history – which major historical events happened on 23 October? Who was born on this date, who died? In which year did the birth or What Happened On This Day – 23 October. 2002 Dubrovka Theater Hostage Crisis. About 50 Chechen rebels led by Movsar Barayev took over the

On this day, Oct. 23 …

1987: The U.S. Senate rejects the Supreme Court nomination of Robert H. Bork in a 58-42 vote.

On this date:

  • 1910: Blanche S. Scott becomes the first woman to make a public solo airplane flight, reaching an altitude of 12 feet at a park in Fort Wayne, Ind.
  • 1915: Tens of thousands of women parade up Fifth Avenue in New York City, demanding the right to vote.
  • 1925: Longtime "Tonight Show" host Johnny Carson is born in Corning, Iowa.
  • 1973: President Richard Nixon agrees to turn over White House tape recordings subpoenaed by the Watergate special prosecutor to Judge John J. Sirica.
  • 1983: A suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International Airport in Lebanon kills 241 U.S. service members, most of them Marines; a near-simultaneous attack on French forces kills 58 paratroopers.
  • 1984: BBC Television reports on the famine in Ethiopia; the story, which shocks viewers, prompts rock star Bob Geldof to organize "Band Aid," a group of celebrities and recording artists who would record the song "Do They Know It's Christmas?" for charity.
  • 1995: A jury in Houston convicts Yolanda Saldivar of murdering Tejano singing star Selena. (Saldivar is serving a life prison sentence.)
  • 2006: Former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling is sentenced by a federal judge in Houston to 24 years, four months for his role in the company's collapse.
  • 2009: President Barack Obama declares the swine flu outbreak a national emergency, giving his health chief the power to let hospitals move emergency rooms offsite to speed treatment and protect non-infected patients.
  • 2009: The NBA and the referees union agree on a two-year contract, ending a lockout of more than a month.
  • 2009: Character actor Lou Jacobi dies in New York at age 95.
  • 2018: China opens the world's longest sea-crossing bridge, a 34-mile span connecting Hong Kong to the mainland.
  • 2018: Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, announces she has been diagnosed with "the beginning stages of dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease."

Premier League 'warned that "Charity Not PPV" campaign WILL carry on' .
Supporters have been boycotting pay-per-view games and instead donating the £14.95 fee to charity and The Athletic report that fan groups have said protests are set to continue.Top flight clubs agreed at a shareholder's meeting to keep the controversial scheme for the next two rounds of matches with officials set to review the format at the next meeting on November 5.

usr: 1
This is interesting!