•   
  •   

World Charlie Hebdo sparks Turkish fury with cartoon of Erdogan

00:30  28 october  2020
00:30  28 october  2020 Source:   msn.com

Turkish Cypriots elect Erdogan's candidate amid east Med tensions

  Turkish Cypriots elect Erdogan's candidate amid east Med tensions Turkish Cypriots in breakaway northern Cyprus on Sunday narrowly elected right-wing nationalist Ersin Tatar, backed by Ankara, in a run-off poll, at a time of heightened tensions in the eastern Mediterranean. Tatar, 60, clinched his surprise victory in a second round of presidential elections, winning 51.7 percent of the vote, official results showed. He edged out incumbent Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci, 72, a supporter of reunification with the Greek Cypriot south of the divided island, leaving attempts to relaunch long- stalled UN-brokered talks hanging in the balance.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has filed a criminal complaint against Dutch right-wing leader Geert Wilders, after he insulted him on social media. Wilders, the leader of the Dutch Party for Freedom, stirred outrage in Turkey on Saturday after he tweeted a cartoon of Erdogan captioned ‘Terrorist’.

Turkish leader Tayyip Erdogan asked his compatriots to stop buying French goods on Monday in the The cartoons first appeared many years ago in the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo , whose Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan makes a speech during a meeting in Ankara, Turkey October 26

Turkey on Tuesday accused French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo of "cultural racism" over a front-page cartoon for its latest edition that mocks President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

a man wearing a suit and tie: President of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has staunchly criticised French President Emmanuel Mcaron, is lampooned on the front-page of the latest Charlie Hebdo edition © Adem ALTAN President of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has staunchly criticised French President Emmanuel Mcaron, is lampooned on the front-page of the latest Charlie Hebdo edition

"We condemn this most disgusting effort by this publication to spread its cultural racism and hatred," Erdogan's top press aide, Fahrettin Altun, tweeted.

"French President Macron's anti-Muslim agenda is bearing fruit! Charlie Hebdo just published a series of so-called cartoons full of despicable images purportedly of our President."

France recalls envoy after Erdogan jibe at Macron

  France recalls envoy after Erdogan jibe at Macron France on Saturday said it was recalling its envoy to Turkey for consultations after comments by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan suggesting French counterpart Emmanuel Macron needed a mental health check-up that Paris condemned as unacceptable. "President Erdogan's comments are unacceptable.France and its NATO ally are at loggerheads over a range of issues including maritime rights in the eastern Mediterranean, Libya, Syria and the escalating conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh.

Turkey , Iran, Jordan and Kuwait are among Islamic countries to criticise the publication of the caricatures, which originally appeared in France in Charlie Hebdo , sparking a terrorist attack on the satirical newspaper in 2015 that killed 12 people. The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation also

Turkish leader Tayyip Erdogan asked his compatriots to stop buying French goods on Monday in the latest expression of anger in the Muslim world over images being displayed in France of the Prophet Mohammad, which some Muslims consider blasphemous.

The front-page caricature of Wednesday's edition of Charlie Hebdo, released online on Tuesday night, shows Erdogan in a t-shirt and underpants, drinking a can of beer and lifting up the skirt of a woman wearing a hijab to reveal her naked bottom.

"Ooh, the prophet!" the character says in a speech bubble, while the title proclaims "Erdogan: in private, he's very funny".

Charlie Hebdo's intervention came during an escalating war of words between Erdogan, Macron and other European leaders after the beheading of French schoolteacher Samuel Paty by a suspected Islamist attacker this month.

Macron vowed that France would stick to its secular traditions and laws guaranteeing freedom of speech which allow publications such as the virulently anti-religion Charlie Hebdo to produce cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.

The most incredible fossils ever unearthed

  The most incredible fossils ever unearthed Fossils have fascinated humankind from time immemorial. These preserved remains from a bygone era transport us through time to discover more about the world before our arrival. In this gallery, discover the most amazing fossils in the world.

A Charlie Hebdo cartoon depicting victims of the Italian earthquake victims as pasta dishes has sparked outrage in the country which is still mourning the nearly 300 people who died in last week's tragedy. The drawings in the current edition of the French satirical weekly depict bloodied victims of

The Turkish lira has hit a record low of 8.15 against the dollar amid investor anxiety about the Turkish economy, hit by coronavirus and friction with Nato allies. President Erdogan 's regional muscle-flexing - in Libya, Syria, around Cyprus and in the Caucasus - has disconcerted investors, market analysts say.

Some of the weekly's previous work lampooning the prophet was shown by Paty in a class on free speech, leading to an online campaign against him and the grisly murder before the start of school holidays on October 16.

An attack on Charlie Hebdo by jihadists in 2015 left 12 people dead, including some of its most famed cartoonists.

Macron's defence of Charlie Hebdo, and his recent comment that Islam worldwide is "in crisis", have prompted Erdogan to urge Turks to boycott French products amid a wave of anti-France protests in Muslim-majority countries.

- Legal action -

Earlier Tuesday, Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte had come to the defence of his country's far-right politician Geert Wilders after Erdogan brought legal action against him.

Wilders had shared a cartoon of the Turkish president wearing an Ottoman hat shaped like a bomb with a lit fuse on Twitter.

"I have a message for President Erdogan and that message is simple: In the Netherlands, freedom of expression is one of our highest values," Rutte said.

Macron and Erdogan, no love lost

  Macron and Erdogan, no love lost The relationship between French President Emmanuel Macron and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan has degenerated in recent months from diplomatic disagreements to annoyance to outright insults. They have clashed over the wars in Syria and Libya, a scramble for natural gas in the Mediterranean and now on Macron's vow to uphold secular values, including the right to mock Islam and other religions, as part of a battle against extremism. -They have clashed over the wars in Syria and Libya, a scramble for natural gas in the Mediterranean and now on Macron's vow to uphold secular values, including the right to mock Islam and other religions, as part of a battle against extremism.

PARIS/ANKARA (Reuters) - Turkish leader Tayyip Erdogan asked his compatriots to stop buying French goods on Monday in the latest expression of anger in the Muslim world The cartoons had initially appeared years ago in the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo , whose Paris editorial office was

France has recalled its ambassador to Turkey for consultations after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan insulted his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron. He said Mr Macron needed a mental health check for pledging to defend secular values and fight radical Islam. Mr Macron has spoken out forcefully on

Previously, European leaders including German Chancellor Angela Merkel had defended Macron after Erdogan suggested he needed "mental checks".

"They are defamatory comments that are completely unacceptable, particularly against the backdrop of the horrific murder of the French teacher Samuel Paty by an Islamist fanatic," German Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman Steffen Seibert said.

Erdogan has a track record of using legal action against critics in Europe.

He brought a case in 2016 against German TV comic Jan Boehmermann, who read out a deliberately defamatory poem about the Turkish leader during his show as part of a skit designed to illustrate the boundaries of free speech.

The row put Merkel in the awkward position of signing off on criminal proceedings against the comic under an archaic lese-majeste law that was later struck from the German legal code.

fc-tgb-adp/

How cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed placed France in the firing line of radical Islam .
In the wake to two terrorist attacks, anti-French protests erupt across the Muslim world in an escalating backlash against the European nations strict form of secularism.Two weeks ago, in a brutal attack that shocked the nation, a Muslim teen beheaded a school teacher in the streets of Paris after he used caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed in a class lesson on freedom of speech.

usr: 29
This is interesting!