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World Record traffic out of Paris as new lockdown begins

03:45  30 october  2020
03:45  30 october  2020 Source:   bbc.com

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Traffic leaving Paris hit record levels just hours before a new national lockdown came into force across France. A similar exodus happened in March, when the first lockdown came into force. At the time some residents of French regions were hostile to Parisians who had fled the capital.

France will begin a four-week lockdown on Friday, French President Emmanuel Macron said Though strict, the new guidelines in both countries are less harsh than lockdowns imposed this spring, which Germany recorded a record 14,964 new daily infections on Wednesday, according to the

Traffic leaving Paris hit record levels just hours before a new national lockdown came into force across France.

a car parked on a city street filled with traffic at night: Traffic stretched for a cumulative 430 miles at, according to local media © EPA Traffic stretched for a cumulative 430 miles at, according to local media

Cars stretched for a cumulative total of 430 miles (700 km) in the Ile-de-France region early on Thursday evening, local media reported.

Lockdown measures came into force at midnight on Friday (23:00 GMT) to tackle spiralling Covid infections.

People have been ordered to stay at home except for essential work or medical reasons.

President Emmanuel Macron said the country risked being "overwhelmed by a second wave that no doubt will be harder than the first".

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Parisians thronged the city's rail stations and took to the highway early on Tuesday to escape the French capital before a lockdown imposed to slow the rate of coronavirus contagion In central Paris , normally choked with traffic , children played out in the streets before the lockdown came into force.

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Daily Covid-19 deaths in France are at the highest level since April. On Thursday, authorities reported 47,637 new cases and 250 new deaths.

French media report that many Parisians have left the city to spend lockdown in the countryside.

Anna, 24, told Le Figaro newspaper that she had left her family's Paris apartment for their second home in Bernay in northern France. She said spending the first lockdown in Paris was "psychologically hard" - but in Bernay, "the air is cleaner, we breathe, we feel free".

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A similar exodus happened in March, when the first lockdown came into force. At the time some residents of French regions were hostile to Parisians who had fled the capital.

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For the new lockdown , the only authorized out - of -home trips will be «to go to work, to a medical Detailed measures of the new lockdown will be announced by the government on Thursday. France on Wednesday recorded 36,437 new COVID-19 infections, 3,020 more than the number registered in

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"We're asking people to stay at home and Parisians to stay in Paris. You can well understand that if 4,000 people from Paris invade and one-third of them are infected without knowing, obviously it risks spreading rapidly," wrote one commentator in the local Sud Ouest (South-West) newspaper.

During the first Covid wave, however, certain regions of France - Paris and the north-east in particular - were being badly hit when the lockdown was imposed, while other areas had comparatively few cases.

This time, officials have said the virus is spreading fast all over the country.

a group of people sitting in front of a store: The measures came into force at midnight local time © EPA The measures came into force at midnight local time

Meanwhile, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said that Brussels had set aside €220m (£200m) in order to transfer Covid patients from hard-hit member states to other nations with spare hospital beds.

She also called for European Union countries to pool their coronavirus data, and urged them not to close their borders to each other.

But she said that "we don't encourage travel now", and that people in Europe should only be embarking on trips if they were essential.

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usr: 0
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