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World Canada police can't explain how they got Huawei exec's home security code

01:50  24 november  2020
01:50  24 november  2020 Source:   msn.com

Canada to resume hearings on extradition of Huawei exec

  Canada to resume hearings on extradition of Huawei exec Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou faces a new round of extradition hearings starting Monday in Vancouver, as the two-year anniversary of her arrest by Canadian authorities approaches. Meng, chief financial officer of the Chinese tech giant, has been fighting extradition to the United States, where she faces fraud and conspiracy charges related to alleged violations by Huawei of US sanctions on Iran. Her arrest in Vancouver on December 1, 2018 plunged Canada-China relations into crisis.Days later, two Canadians were detained in China, accused by Beijing of espionage in what Ottawa has insisted was a retaliatory move.

VANCOUVER — The border officer who led Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou' s immigration exam before her arrest at Vancouver' s airport says he doesn' t believe RCMP asked him to collect the passcodes to her phones. Sowmith Katragadda told an evidence-gathering hearing in Meng' s B.C

VANCOUVER — The border officer who led Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou' s immigration exam before her arrest at Vancouver' s airport says he doesn' t Meng is wanted in the United States on fraud charges based on allegations related to U. S . sanctions against Iran that both she and Huawei deny.

An officer revealed Monday Canadian police obtained the security code to Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou's Vancouver house -- not merely passcodes to her electronic devices, which defense lawyers allege violated her rights.

a woman standing in front of a store: Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, seen outside the British Columbia Supreme Court, has been fighting extradition to the United States since 2018 © Don MacKinnon Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, seen outside the British Columbia Supreme Court, has been fighting extradition to the United States since 2018

Constable Gurvinder Dhaliwal, the federal police officer in charge of securing evidence in the extradition case, who assisted in her December 2018 arrest on a US warrant, testified in court he was given the security code by another Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer but said: "I have no idea where he got that from."

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VANCOUVER — The border officer who led Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou' s immigration exam before her arrest at Vancouver' s airport says he doesn' t believe RCMP asked him to collect the passcodes to her phones. Sowmith Katragadda told an evidence-gathering hearing in Meng' s B.C

canada . Trudeau rejects calls to end Huawei exec ' s extradition to U.S., even if it would free jailed Acting on a U.S. extradition warrant, Canadian police arrested Meng at the Vancouver airport in Canada ’s arrest of the daughter of Huawei ’s founder has enraged China, which has demanded her

Meng, Huawei's chief financial officer, has been for two years fighting extradition to the United States, where she faces fraud charges related to the company's activities in Iran in breach of US sanctions.

This month's hearings have heard from police and customs officers involved in her arrest.

Dhaliwal also said he was emailed three days after the Meng's arrest on December 1, 2018 by another RCMP officer, Ben Chang, who asked him to access her electronic devices' serial numbers and identification codes to pass on to the US Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Chang has since refused to testify despite being requested as a witness by Meng's defense lawyers, a matter they have called "of some concern" with "consequences."

And the one email Chang eventually sent to the FBI about Meng's arrest, according to court filings, was deleted after he retired from the RCMP. He has denied providing the FBI with Meng's device passcodes.

Canadian border officer testifies at extradition hearing of Huawei exec

  Canadian border officer testifies at extradition hearing of Huawei exec Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou faced the second day of a new round of extradition hearings Tuesday in Vancouver, during which a Canadian border officer who participated in her 2018 interrogation said she was not forced to hand over the passwords to her electronic devices. On Tuesday, the court heard from Sanjit Dhillon, a Canadian customs official present at the time of Meng's arrest, who denied that Meng had been forced to hand over the passwords for her two phones and laptop."I don't recall that would be an offense if somebody has refused to provide their pass code," Dhillon said.According to him, Meng was not legally "detained" by border officers in December 2018.

Canadian police illegally shared details of Meng Wanzhou' s phone with US authorities, lawyers said Thursday, in a bid to have an extradition case against the top Huawei executive thrown out. The 47-year-old chief financial officer of the Chinese telco giant was detained during a stopover at Vancouver

Canadian police arrested Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou at Vancouver' s airport Dec. How powerful is Huawei ? | The Weekly with Wendy Mesley. 2 years ago. Wendy Mesley explains why Huawei faces growing scrutiny over privacy, security and its 5G networks.

It was not clear what, if anything, Canadian authorities did with the security code to Meng's house.

A piece of paper with the code written on it, as well as her house keys, were handed over to a person Meng called to collect her luggage at the Vancouver airport after she was detained.

Meng stayed at the house for several months under strict bail conditions, before moving into another, larger Vancouver home that she owns.

Her lawyers contend that Canada violated her rights when she was detained, searched and interrogated for hours.

The daughter of Huawei's founder was questioned without a lawyer present and without knowing why, and had to give the passwords to her electronic devices -- phones and a laptop -- to customs officers, who gave them to the federal police.

The passwords were then sent to the FBI, which Meng's lawyers have latched onto to accuse Canadian federal police of colluding with the US agency.

Canada has consistently denied abusing Meng's rights.

The extradition case is scheduled to wrap up in April 2021.

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Huawei: Smartphone sales slumped by another 20 percent - no end in sight .
Huawei's smartphone sales decline for the third quarter in a row. However, analysts believe that the bottom is still a long way off. © t3n Huawei Mate 40 Pro. The Chinese technology group Huawei continues to suffer from the massive US sanctions , which effectively make it impossible for the group to buy US products or products made with US technologies. The company is particularly hard hit by the ban on integrating Google services on its smartphones.

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