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World Type O blood linked to lower risk, taking Vitamin D unlikely to help

00:10  28 november  2020
00:10  28 november  2020 Source:   reuters.com

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Could your blood type help protect you from coronavirus? People with Type O are nearly 20% LESS likely to Researchers say this indicates a link between variations in the ABO gene, which determines blood Comparatively, those in blood group O had a lower risk of catching the infection than people in Prince Andrew's life as a working royal 'is finished': Duke of York is 'highly unlikely to serve his

Vitamin D overview for health professionals. The FDA developed DVs to help consumers compare the nutrient contents of foods and dietary supplements within the context of a total diet. Proportions at risk of deficiency were lowest among children aged 1–5 years (0.5%), peaked at 7.6% in adults aged

By Nancy Lapid

a close up of a flower: FILE PHOTO: A computer image created by Nexu Science Communication together with Trinity College in Dublin, shows a model structurally representative of a betacoronavirus which is the type of virus linked to COVID-19 © Reuters/Social Media FILE PHOTO: A computer image created by Nexu Science Communication together with Trinity College in Dublin, shows a model structurally representative of a betacoronavirus which is the type of virus linked to COVID-19

(Reuters) - The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Certain blood groups less likely to get COVID-19

A large study adds to evidence that people with type O or Rh−negative blood may be at slightly lower risk from the new coronavirus. Among 225,556 Canadians who were tested for the virus, the risk for a COVID-19 diagnosis was 12% lower and the risk for severe COVID-19 or death was 13% lower in people with blood group O versus those with A, AB, or B, researchers reported on Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine. People in any blood group who were Rh-negative were also somewhat protected, especially if they had O-negative blood. People in these blood type groups may have developed antibodies that can recognize some aspect of the new virus, coauthor Dr. Joel Ray of St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto told Reuters. "Our next study will specifically look at such antibodies, and whether they explain the protective effect," Ray said. Whether or how this information might influence COVID-19 prevention or treatment is still unclear. (https://bit.ly/2JhQvws)

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‘Invisible’ stool blood linked to heightened risk of death from all causes. Adult exposure to chickenpox linked to lower risk of shingles. Anti-obesity programmes in schools unlikely to halt child obesity epidemic. Cyberbullying linked to various types of post traumatic stress for victims and perpetrators.

You can take specific vitamins and supplements to support healthy blood flow for your entire body or for specific areas. You’ll get the best results if you work alongside your doctor, who can design a plan tailored specifically to your health profile and help you avoid potentially negative side effects.

Vitamin D fails to help in severe COVID-19 cases

Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to higher risk for severe COVID-19, but high vitamin D levels do not fix the problem. Increasing vitamin D levels in critically ill patients did not shorten their hospital stay or lower their odds of being moved to intensive care, needing mechanical ventilation, or dying, doctors in Brazil found. They randomly gave 240 patients hospitalized with severe COVID-19 either a single high dose of vitamin D3 or a placebo. Only 6.7% of patients in the vitamin D group had "deficient" levels of the nutrient, compared to 51.5% of patients in the placebo group, but there was no difference in the outcomes, according to a paper posted on medRxiv ahead of peer review. The same was true when the researchers focused on the 116 patients with vitamin D deficiency before the treatment. The authors say theirs is the first randomized trial of its kind to show that vitamin D supplementation "is ineffective to improve hospital length of stay or any other clinical outcomes among hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19." (https://bit.ly/3mfqOeH)

Where to Buy the Best Face Masks Online 2020

  Where to Buy the Best Face Masks Online 2020 With face masks still mandatory in many states, stock up so we can all help protect others from the coronavirus -- in style.Demand for the best face mask options -- and the best breathable face mask options -- has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

Taking medications that improve blood flow may help manage conditions that cause poor lower blood pressure. reduce cholesterol levels. reduce inflammatory chemicals within blood vessels. Summary. Many vitamins , minerals, and other supplements have the potential to help increase

A new, preliminary study asks whether blood type might help predict COVID-19 risk . All data and statistics are based on publicly available data at the time of publication. They also found that the proportion of people with blood type O was significantly lower among the group with COVID-19 than

Triggers of COVID-19 "cytokine storm" identified

A form of inflammatory cell death called panoptosis triggers the storm of cytokines, or inflammatory proteins, that causes critical illness in COVID-19, researchers say. During panoptosis, "cells spew out their contents instead of neatly packaging them away" as happens during routine cell death, Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital told Reuters. Neighboring cells see the debris, including cytokines, as a sign of danger, and respond by secreting more cytokines, allowing the cytokine storm to build, said Kanneganti. Her team identified a synergy between two cytokines, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, as the cause of panoptosis in COVID-19. Mice given TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma developed the symptoms and organ damage of COVID-19 and died rapidly, Kanneganti said. Treatment with antibodies that neutralize these two cytokines protected the mice from death, not just from COVID-19 but also from other life-threatening illnesses involving cytokine storms, such as sepsis, her team reported in Cell. Trials are needed to test these treatments in humans, Kanneganti said. (https://bit.ly/375VBEa)

Drinking hot cocoa is linked to better memory skills because it's filled with brain-healthy nutrients, a study found

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Risk for individuals still low , but could translate into large numbers of patients, say researchers Use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor drugs (ACEIs). Adult exposure to chickenpox linked to lower risk of shingles. Anti-obesity programmes in schools unlikely to halt child obesity epidemic.

Scientists claim there is no evidence to support taking vitamin D supplements to stave off chronic disease and early death - and results of several multi-million dollar trials currently under way are unlikely to alter this view. A new review examines existing evidence from 40 randomised controlled

COVID-19 survivors benefit from home health care

COVID-19 survivors benefit from home health care after being discharged from hospital, new data show. Researchers from the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, the University of Pennsylvania, and Villanova University studied 1,409 patients who received home health care, nearly half of whom were under age 65. When they were discharged, 80% were still short of breath, most reported anxiety or confusion, and more than 80% needed help walking, dressing, and bathing. After an average of 32 days of home health care, 94% no longer needed the service. The vast majority were not completely recovered, but most symptoms were significantly improved, as was the patients' ability to perform daily activities. Only 10% needed to be rehospitalized, the researchers reported on Tuesday in Annals of Internal Medicine. "Only 11% of COVID-19 survivors nationwide were discharged from hospital settings with skilled home health services," coauthor Margaret McDonald of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York said. This study "suggests that HHC is significantly underutilized in the recovery of hospitalized COVID-19 patients." (https://bit.ly/39kY7Jz)

Open https://tmsnrt.rs/3a5EyDh in an external browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines and treatments in development.

(Reporting by Nancy Lapid; Editing by Tiffany Wu)

Use this 7-day diabetic meal plan to balance your sugar levels: What your plate should look like day-to-day .
A diabetic meal plan can help regulate blood sugar levels because it can help you plan out your meals ahead of time and stick to a regular eating schedule, which reduces the risk of blood sugar spikes. Small, but frequent meals and snacks as well as keeping an eye on carb intake are the key parts of this plan. Keep in mind: Everyone's personal dietary needs differ depending on height, weight, and activity level and major changes to your diet should be discussed with your physician. Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice.

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