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World Chinese coal miners die in underground gas leak

08:30  05 december  2020
08:30  05 december  2020 Source:   bbc.com

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  Australian coal worth $700MILLION is stuck off Chinese ports A total of 53 ships carrying 5.7 million tonnes of Australia's coal are still waiting to dock off ports in China, as the Communist Party continues to turn the screws on Australian exporters in bitter feud.A total of 53 ships carrying over 5.7 million tonnes of Australia's coal are still waiting to dock off several ports in China's industrial north.

Chinese state TV says 18 miners have died and five others are missing after a leak of carbon monoxide gas at a coal mine in the south-west of the country. According to CCTV, the gas leak at the Diaoshuidong mine happened while workers were dismantling underground equipment.

The bodies of the last five Chinese miners trapped underground in Henan Province have been recovered, bringing the final toll to 37. Some 300 rescuers had been working since Saturday to reach the men after a gas leak at the pit in Yuzhou. More than 2,500 tonnes of coal dust smothered the pit

Chinese state TV says 18 miners have died and five others are missing after a leak of carbon monoxide gas at a coal mine in the south-west of the country.

Rescuers are attempting to reach others trapped underground © Getty Images Rescuers are attempting to reach others trapped underground

One person was rescued from the Diaoshuidong mine in Chongqing municipality, broadcaster CCTV reported.

An investigation has been launched into the incident, which happened on Friday.

Mining accidents in China are not uncommon and are often due to poorly enforced safety regulations.

According to CCTV, the gas leak at the Diaoshuidong mine happened while workers were dismantling underground equipment. The mine had been closed for the previous two months.

China fires shot in trade war by slapping tariffs on Australian wine

  China fires shot in trade war by slapping tariffs on Australian wine China is set to impose significant anti-dumping duties on Australian wine from Saturday. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce has determined that Australian exporters have been dumping wine into its market. 'There is dumping of imported wines originating in Australia ... (and) it has been substantive,' the ministry said in a statement on its website.'There is a causal relationship between dumping and material damage and it has been decided to implement temporary anti-dumping measures ... in the form of a deposit from November 28.

China is the largest producer and consumer of coal in the world and is the largest user of coal -derived electricity. The share of coal in the energy mix declined during the 2010s

A Chinese coal miner was recently found alive in an abandoned mine 17 years after he had been trapped inside it by an earthquake. A group of coal miners from the western province of Xinjiang, had an unbelievable surprise when the gallery they were excavating opened up on a section of an old

a group of police officers riding on the back of a truck: Emergency teams have assembled outside the Diaoshuidong mine © Getty Images Emergency teams have assembled outside the Diaoshuidong mine

In September, 16 workers were killed at another mine on the outskirts of Chongqing when a conveyor belt caught fire, producing high levels of carbon monoxide.

In December 2019, an explosion at a coal mine in Guizhou province, south-west China, killed at least 14 people.

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