•   
  •   

World Social media faces reckoning as Trump ban forces reset

05:04  20 january  2021
05:04  20 january  2021 Source:   msn.com

Joe Biden is ending Trump’s travel ban

  Joe Biden is ending Trump’s travel ban It’s the beginning of the end for Trump’s immigration policies.The policy, colloquially known as the “Muslim ban,” first went into effect in January 2017 and became one of Trump’s signature immigration policies. The ban has slowed or altogether halted legal immigration from certain countries that the former administration deemed to be security threats, keeping families apart and even stymieing refugee resettlement.

Social media giants crossed a threshold in banning US President Donald Trump and an array of his supporters -- and now face a quandary on defining their efforts to remain politically neutral while promoting democracy and free speech.

US President Donald Trump has been banned from most social media platforms, supposedly for inciting riots at the Capitol. But with no one capable of holding the tech behemoths to account, even fervent Trump -haters should worry.

Social media giants crossed a threshold in banning US President Donald Trump and an array of his supporters -- and now face a quandary on defining their efforts to remain politically neutral while promoting democracy and free speech.

logo: Social networks are having to rethink their policies for content moderation after banning President Donald Trump over his incitements to violence © Denis Charlet Social networks are having to rethink their policies for content moderation after banning President Donald Trump over his incitements to violence a group of people riding on the back of a motorcycle: Social platforms blamed President Donald Trump for encouraging his supporters to riot on January 6 to back his claims of election fraud © ROBERTO SCHMIDT Social platforms blamed President Donald Trump for encouraging his supporters to riot on January 6 to back his claims of election fraud

After the unprecedented violence in the seat of Congress, Trump was banned for inciting the rioters -- on platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Google-owned YouTube and Snapchat. The alternative network Parler, which drew many Trump backers, was forced offline by Amazon's web services unit.

The Presidency Won’t Go Back to How It Was

  The Presidency Won’t Go Back to How It Was President Joe Biden—and those who follow him—will navigate a new political landscape, reshaped by four years of Donald Trump.True, Biden’s time in office will witness reversals by conservatives and progressives on some of the uses and limits of presidential power. The Harvard law professor Adrian Vermeule predicted at the dawn of the Trump administration that the sides would reverse their positions about aggressive uses of presidential administration. He compared the pattern to two lines of dancers in a Jane Austen novel who move to opposite sides of the ballroom and then continue dancing as before.

Jan.14 -- After a presidency spent using the network to move markets, promote conspiracy theories, and threaten war, President Donald Trump ’s violation on Jan. UP NEXT. NOW PLAYING: Crime. How Trump Has Changed Social Media Forever.

Social media , as well as mainstream media like CNN gave him a platform and his goons a megaphone, and helped legitimise his administration. Not disagreeing, and I cannot condone social media for not acting, but banning POTUS from a platform is a political move with consequences.

graphical user interface, website: Donald Trump had more than 80 million Twitter followers and used the messaging platform as a key way to connect with supporters before he was banned by the service for breaking its rules © - Donald Trump had more than 80 million Twitter followers and used the messaging platform as a key way to connect with supporters before he was banned by the service for breaking its rules

The bans broke new ground for internet firms but also shattered the longstanding notion that they are simply neutral platforms open for all to express any views.

"Banning Donald Trump was a crossing of a Rubicon for social media firms, and they can't go back," said Samuel Woolley, a professor and researcher with the University of Texas Center for Media Engagement.

"Up to now their biggest goal was to promote free speech, but recent events have shown they can no longer do this."

Twitter chief Jack Dorsey last week defended the Trump ban while acknowledging it stemmed from "a failure of ours ultimately to promote healthy conversation" and that  it "sets a precedent I feel is dangerous: the power an individual or corporation has over a part of the global public conversation."

Trump impeachment defense in crisis with Giuliani named in evidence

  Trump impeachment defense in crisis with Giuliani named in evidence Donald Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who has led Trump's legal effort to overturn the election results, is expected to head his legal effort as the impeachment trial approaches in the Senate.Sources have already said Trump may turn to lawyer Rudy Giuliani as he battles impeachment a second time, this time before a Senate 'jury' that may be considerably more skeptical than last time. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday he does not know how he will vote.

Apple has banned Parler, a social media app popular with Trump supporters, from the App Store. We've made the decision to remove the PogChamp emote following statements from the face of the The pro- Trump server the Donald has been banned "due to its overt connection to an online forum

Trump is also facing a new controversy over the resignation of Geoffrey S. Berman as the chief federal prosecutor in New York after a dramatic standoff with “If the president can stay focused on his plans and his ability to rebuild the economy, to restore social stability and get us back to normalcy, I think

Javier Pallero, policy director for the digital rights nonprofit group Access Now, said the banning of Trump could be just the beginning for social media firms grappling with dangerous content, including from political leaders.

"The companies have reacted to calls for violence by the president in the United States, and that's a good call. But they have failed in other areas like Myanmar," where social media has been used to carry out persecution, Pallero said.

- Human rights first? -

Social platforms are being forced in some part of the world to choose to follow national laws or to prioritize human rights principles, Pallero noted.

"We ask platforms to put human rights first. Sometimes they do, but all decisions on content governance are always a game of frustration," he said.

In authoritarian regimes with restrictive social media laws, Pallero said the platforms "should stay and give a voice to democracy activists... however if they have to identify dissidents or censor them, they probably should leave, but not without a fight."

How the Army's 'Robin Sage' puts Special Forces hopefuls to a final, make-or-break test in the forests of North Carolina

  How the Army's 'Robin Sage' puts Special Forces hopefuls to a final, make-or-break test in the forests of North Carolina Every few months, a swath of central North Carolina becomes the territory of Pineland, where aspiring Green Berets test their mettle and their skills. Robin Sage, as it is known, is the culminating exercise in the Special Forces pipeline and is where those students get their first real taste of what Special Forces does. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Every few months, several North Carolina counties host a unique special-operations event. Robin Sage is a four-week exercise that all Special Forces candidates must pass before they graduate and don the coveted Green Beret. Named after Col.

Outgoing US President Donald Trump will remain banned from uploading or live-streaming on his YouTube channel for at least a week, Google said amid a By that time, Twitter and Facebook had already suspended Trump ’s social media accounts, echoing accusations from Democrats and the

media captionTrump has tweeted a video finally condemning the Capitol rioters. US President Donald Trump has been allowed to Tweet again, after being locked out of his account for 12 hours. Posting a more conciliatory message, he refrained from reiterating false claims of voter fraud.

Woolley said social networks that banned Trump are likely to face pressure to take action against similarly styled leaders who abuse the platforms.


Video: Ongoing threat from Trump supporters, anti-government anarchists analyzed by experts (MSNBC)

"They can't simply ban a politician in the US without taking similar action around the world," he said. "It would be seen as prioritizing the United States in way that would be seen as unfair."

- Platform power -

Trump's ban was a major step for Twitter, which the president used for policy announcements and to connect with his more than 80 million followers. Until recently, platforms have given world leaders leeway when enforcing rules, noting that their comments are in the public interest even if they are inflammatory.

The de-platforming of Trump underscored the immense power of a handful of social networks over information flows, noted Bret Schafer, a researcher with the nonprofit Alliance for Securing Democracy.

"One of the things that compelled them to act was that we saw the president's rhetoric manifest itself into real-world violence," Schafer said. "That may be where they draw the line."

As Trump prepares for final presidential pardons, will he attempt to pardon himself?

  As Trump prepares for final presidential pardons, will he attempt to pardon himself? Trump is reportedly planning to make more than 100 pardons before leaving office.According to CNN, Trump held a meeting on Sunday with top aides — including his daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner — to review candidates for his final pardons. The Washington Post has reported that he will announce pardons and prison sentence commutations on either Monday or Tuesday.

But he noted inconsistencies in enforcing these policies in other parts of the world, including in authoritarian regimes.

"The is a legitimate argument on whether leaders in some of these countries should be allowed to have an account when their citizens do not, and can't take part in the discussion," Schafer said.

- Regulatory conundrum -

Internet firms are likely to face heightened calls for regulation following the recent turmoil.

Karen Kornbluh, who heads the digital innovation and democracy initiative at the German Marshall Fund, said any regulatory tweaks should be modest to avoid government regulating online speech.

Kornbluh said platforms should have a  transparent "code of conduct" that limits disinformation and incitements to violence and should be held accountable if they fail to live up to those terms.

"I don't think we want to regulate the internet," she said. "We want to apply offline protection for individual rights."

Platforms could also use "circuit breakers" to prevent inflammatory content from going viral, modeled as those used on Wall Street for extreme swings.

"The code should focus not on content but practices," she said. "You don't want the government deciding on content."

Schafer cited a need for "some algorithmic oversight" of platforms to ensure against bias and amplification of inflammatory content.

He said the controversial Section 230 law remains important in enabling platforms to remove inappropriate content, but that it remains challenging "to moderate in a way that protects free speech and civil liberties."

Daniel Kreiss, a professor and researcher with the University of North Carolina's Center for Information, Technology, and Public Life, said the major platforms "are going to have to rebuild their policies from the ground up" as a result of the crisis.

"This situation absolutely reveals the power of platform companies to make decisions on who gets hurt in the public sphere," Kreiss said.

"The power they have is not simply free speech, it's free amplification. But because they are private companies, under the law we give them a fair amount of latitude to set their own policies."

rl/caw/

Trump plans to leave Washington before the inauguration because he doesn't want to fly out as an ex-president or ask Biden to borrow Air Force One, report says .
President Donald Trump wants to leave Washington DC before President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated on January 20,CNN reported. His aim is to avoid leaving the White House as an ex-president, CNN said. It also suggested Trump doesn't want to ask Biden if he can borrow Air Force One. Biden is due to be sworn in around midday on January 20, amid a heightened security presence prompted by the riot at the US Capitol. Trump intends to fly to Florida and his Mar-a-Lago resort,Bloomberg reported Friday, to start his post-presidential life. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

usr: 0
This is interesting!