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World The Burmese military junta under intense pressure

09:25  23 february  2021
09:25  23 february  2021 Source:   lepoint.fr

Malaysia: 1200 Burmese in an irregular situation soon to be deported?

 Malaysia: 1200 Burmese in an irregular situation soon to be deported? © AFP - STR The military junta had been in power for less than ten days in Burma when it offered to send three of its boats to repatriate 1,200 Burmese irregularly in Malaysia. Three Burmese army boats are expected to arrive on the Malaysian coast on February 21. It is an unprecedented scale operation that is brewing, Reuters reported on Friday. Among Burmese refugee communities in Kuala Lumpur, concern continues to grow.

As the United Nations Security Council condemns the Burmese military junta , calls are increasing for foreign multinational companies to stop working with the Burmese military government. In the United States, much of the criticism has been focused on the California-based oil company Chevron. Chevron is one of the largest foreign investors in Burma and is the only remaining major U.S. corporation with a significant presence there. Chevron is partners with the French oil company Total in operating a natural gas pipeline from Burma to Thailand. Chevron became involved in the project in 2005 when it bought

The US has vowed to take more steps against the military junta that seized power in Myanmar earlier this month. The American embassy in the country earlier condemned the killing of a female student at a protest. US State Department spokesperson Ned Price called on the Burmese military to release “all those unjustly detained” after the coup. The American embassy in the country previously said it was “deeply troubled” by the fatal shooting of a young female protester at an anti-coup rally in Myanmar’s capital Naypyidaw.

  La junte militaire birmane soumise à d'intenses pressions © Provided by Le Point

L The soldiers responsible for the coup in Burma were more than ever Tuesday under pressure Tuesday the day after the adoption by the United States and the European Union new sanctions and demonstrations among the most massive since the putsch of February 1.

For three weeks, the Burmese authorities have not stopped intensifying the use of force in order to weaken the pro-democracy mobilization.

So far, three protesters have been killed as a man who was patrolling to avoid mass arrests in his neighborhood in Yangon was shot dead.

On the night of Monday to Tuesday, the United States announced sanctions against two other leaders of the Burmese military junta which overthrew the civilian government of Aung San Suu Kyi , General Maung Maung Kyaw, at the head of the Air Force, and Lieutenant General Moe Myint Tun.

Burma: junta warns demonstrators that they risk dying

 Burma: junta warns demonstrators that they risk dying © Supplied by Le Point L The Burmese junta has toughened its tone after a weekend of bloody violence by warning demonstrators that they risked death. die, which did not deter thousands of people from taking to the streets on Monday. Three weeks after the putsch of February 1, pro-democracy mobilization does not weaken with tens of thousands of demonstrators on Sunday, and a campaign of civil disobedience which disrupts the functioning of the State and the economy.

As the United Nations Security Council condemns the Burmese military junta , calls are increasing for foreign multinational companies to stop working with the Burmese military government. In the United States, much of the criticism has been focused on the California-based oil company Chevron. Chevron is one of the largest foreign investors in Burma and is the only remaining major U.S. corporation with a significant presence there. Chevron is partners with the French oil company Total in operating a natural gas pipeline from Burma to Thailand. Chevron became involved in the project in 2005 when it bought

Burma 's ruling military junta has warned it is ready to "take action" against Buddhist monks leading mounting protests, state media have reported. Brig Gen Thura Myint Maung, minister for religion, warned them not to break Buddhist "rules and regulations" as Rangoon saw the largest march yet. He blamed the protests on "destructive elements" opposed to peace in Burma . President George W Bush is set to announce fresh US sanctions on Burmese leaders, the White House says. The sanctions, which will include a ban on US visas, will be announced during Mr Bush's speech at the United

A round of similar measures had already been announced by Washington ten days ago, targeting several leaders of the ruling junta, including its leader, General Min Aung Hlaing.

"We will not hesitate to take new measures against those who commit acts of violence and suppress the will of the people. We will not weaken in our support for the Burmese people", warned the head of American diplomacy Antony Blinken.

He called on "the army and the police to cease all attacks on peaceful protesters, immediately release all those unjustly detained, end the attacks and intimidation against journalists and activists, and restore the government democratically elected ".

This announcement came a few hours after the EU's decision to take sanctions against the economic and financial interests of the military responsible for the coup.

Burma: the junta's warning

 Burma: the junta's warning © Provided by Le Point Burma, Myanmar, putsch L a Burmese junta wanted to be firmer, Sunday February 22, by issuing a warning to those who dispute in the street the putsch of February 1. " The demonstrators are inciting people, especially the exalted adolescents and young people, to embark on the path of confrontation where they will perish," said a statement in Burmese read on the public channel MRTV, and one English translation appeared on screen.

The Burmese leader and her party are attempting to bring in more democratic reforms ahead of general elections later this year. The military , however, does not want to let go of power. Myanmar's parliament on Tuesday voted against constitutional amendments that would phase out the influence of the military in politics by bringing in changes to the constitutional charter drafted by the military junta in 2008. The Nobel Peace Prize winner has come under international pressure over the government's handling of Rohingya refugees in the country in recent years.

The Burmese authorities have come under concerted international pressure to allow more relief and aid workers into the country to help speed up the recovery process. Over the weekend UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon revealed that Senior Burmese General Than Shwe had agreed to allow all aid workers into the I have travelled here to Rangoon at the request of the United Nations Secretary General to press the regime to allow full and unfettered access for international aid workers. "I have told the Burmese ministers that I have met: 'You will be judged not by your words but by your actions.'

"All direct financial aid (...) to government reform programs is suspended," said the head of European diplomacy Josep Borrell .

However, he clarified that the EU does not intend to reduce its trade relations with Burma, fearing that this will affect the population.

"Pray for them"

These sanctions come after the Burmese army used rubber bullets, tear gas, water cannons and sometimes even live ammunition against demonstrators.

It also deployed more security forces in the streets of Rangoon, the country's largest city and its economic capital.

To prevent the demonstrators from assembling, barricades have been set up around crossroads and arteries leading to embassies.

Since the putsch, more than 680 people have been arrested, charged or sentenced according to an NGO helping political prisoners and almost all of them are still behind bars.

Nightly internet shutdowns ordered by the junta raise fears that the authorities will take advantage of them to carry out mass arrests of pro-democracy activists.

Fear and isolation as Myanmar junta cuts internet

  Fear and isolation as Myanmar junta cuts internet For the past two nights, Kyaw Soe has felt a knot in his stomach as he imagines family members, friends and colleagues swept up in night-time raids, increasingly common since Myanmar's military coup of February 1. That includes civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and deposed president Win Myint, who have not been seen in public since they were detained in pre-dawn raids on February 1. The military's ouster of the democratically elected government has galvanised a tremendous backlash with nationwide protests, a nightly campaign of banging pots and pans and strikes of factory workers, bankers, civil servants and even police officers.

Under the junta , 640 people have been arrested, charged or sentenced, with 593, including Suu Kyi and President Win Myint, still in detention, according to the independent Assistance Association for Political Prisoners. Three weeks after seizing power, the junta has failed to stop the daily protests and a civil disobedience movement calling for the reversal of the Feb. 1 coup and release of elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Hundreds of thousands gathered in cities and towns across the country, from the northern hills on the border with China to the central plains, the Irrawaddy river delta and the

The Burmese authorities later launched their own investigation into what happened at Inn Din, and jailed seven soldiers for their involvement in the killings of 10 Rohingya Muslim men there. It was a rare admission of wrongdoing - the military has exonerated itself of blame for the violence and refused to How tarnished is Suu Kyi's reputation? The 73-year-old former activist, who spent more than a decade under house arrest during the military junta period, was once seen as a global human rights icon. But her perceived failure to stop the rape and killing of Rohingyas has sullied her international reputation

So far, the measures taken by the junta have not dissuaded the demonstrators from taking to the streets.

Among them are many civil servants, bank employees, caregivers and public works employees who have stopped working in solidarity.

On Monday, tens of thousands of people gathered in Naypyidaw, the administrative capital.

More than 100 people were arrested as police chased people through the streets.

In Rangoon, the demonstrators continued to march, despite the presence of the police and the barricades deployed across the city.

They took part in improvised vigils organized in memory of the demonstrators killed.

"We can just pray for them," explained one of them, student Thura Myo.

"Even though we are sad, our voices will be heard by the international community".

Calls to stop working have severely disrupted government, business and banking activities.

The power had brandished Sunday the threat of resorting to lethal force to put an end to "anarchy".

23/02/2021 06:17:30 - Rangoon ( AFP ) - © 2021 AFP

Thousands of Burmese demonstrated, the Internet cut again .
© Provided by Le Parisien Le Parisien Internet was again cut very early on Tuesday in Burma where thousands of people still demonstrated the day before to demand democracy , despite the deployment of troops by the junta in several cities. The connections had also been interrupted for hours the night before, before being reestablished in the early morning when we resumed work.

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