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World House Administrative Official Tells Congress Mental Impact of Capitol Riot Could Be Long-lasting

02:00  25 february  2021
02:00  25 february  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

The NAACP is suing Trump, Giuliani, and 2 extremist groups for inciting the violent Capitol riot

  The NAACP is suing Trump, Giuliani, and 2 extremist groups for inciting the violent Capitol riot The NAACP is suing Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani for their alleged connection to the Capitol riot. The suit also named the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers as defendants. It accuses them of violating the Klu Klux Klan Act by conspiring to incite a riot. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. A Mississippi congressman and the NAACP have filed suit against former President Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani, and two extremist groups in connection to the January 6 Capitol insurrection. The suit was brought on behalf of Rep.

(CNN) The US Capitol is surrounded by fences and troops amid fear the January 6 riots could spark violence this weekend and leading up to Wednesday's inauguration. But experts worry the real threat may be what the attack unleashed for the long term. "The plots of tomorrow are literally being Segal calls the Capitol attack a seminal moment and says it will have a major impact , even more than the country's historically biggest catalysts for major anti-government activity. "It ain't Waco, it's not Ruby Ridge, this is bigger than that," Segal explains comparing January 6 to past events that sparked calls

The insurrection at the Capitol could have a far-reaching impact on racial justice in America -- bigger, even, than last summer's George Floyd protests. In some ways, it already has.

Nearly two months after a mob of angry Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, members of Congress are beginning to dive into the fallout from an attack that left five people dead and many more injured.

a group of people standing in front of a large crowd of people: Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election. © Samuel Corum/Getty Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election.

But so far there's been little clarity on what law enforcement knew before the riots that caused millions in property damage, threatened priceless Capitol artifacts and forced the federal government to consider the long-term mental effects on its employees.

Capitol Police Chief Pittman says threats to Congress members up by 93.5% in first 2 months of 2021

  Capitol Police Chief Pittman says threats to Congress members up by 93.5% in first 2 months of 2021 Capitol Police acting Chief Yogananda Pittman testified before a House Appropriations subcommittee Wednesday that threats to members of Congress have increased by 93.5% within the first two months of 2021, compared to the same time period last year. And from 2017 to 2020, Pittman said there has been a 118.66% increase in "total threats and directions of interests," with the overwhelming majority of suspects residing outside the National Capital Region (NCR) in Washington, D.C. CAPITOL RIOT HEARING: DC NATIONAL GUARD GENERAL SAYS 3 HOURS PASSED BEFORE ARMY APPROVED REQUEST ON JAN.

How the US Capitol riot unfolded, minute by minute. But defense officials point to the role of the National Guard as a last line of enforcement in the Capitol , backing up all of Biden administration works to clean house of Trump appointees. Trump's Postmaster General wants to stay on the job, but his… The performance and effectiveness of content that you see or interact with can be measured.

At least three Democrats in Congress said that the pro-Trump rioters who stormed the Capitol on Wednesday stole computers from their offices, raising cybersecurity concerns. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., had a laptop stolen, as did Sen. While experts say most congressional laptops shouldn't provide easy access to classified material, both the Senate and House connect to a centralized email server, and staffers' computers likely contain months or years of emails and other sensitive material. “There’s a very good chance that a lot of sensitive and possibly secret information

"While the physical scarring and damage to our magnificent Capitol building can be detected and repaired, the emotional aspects of the events of January 6 are more difficult to notice and treat," Catherine Szpindor, chief administrative officer of the U.S. House testified in a hearing Wednesday.

Szpindor described the "harrowing hours" she spent sheltering with other employees "as chaos was ensuing just outside of our office in the Capitol."

"After a critical incident, feelings of fear, desperation, anxiety and depression can linger undetected or even be ignored," she said.

Several offices have increased mental health services for employees, including adding new counselors and wellness liaisons to promote offerings.

Judge Denies Release of Capitol Rioter Who Argued Lack of Cellphone Made Him Less of a Threat

  Judge Denies Release of Capitol Rioter Who Argued Lack of Cellphone Made Him Less of a Threat Emanuel Jackson allegedly hit police officers with a baseball bat and a judge ruled there were no release conditions that could ensure the safety of the community or law enforcement.There are more than 180 cases against alleged Capitol rioters and prosecutors are increasingly citing the possibility of a future threat when pushing judges to deny their requests for pretrial release. In arguing for his release, Jackson, 20, pointed to the fact he turned himself in to law enforcement, has no criminal history and that communicating with people planning future riots could be challenging for him.

The key officials in charge of security at the U.S. Capitol disagree on why they didn’t seek National Guard help before the Jan. She also said that for many Republicans, these hearings will be another moment for them to reconcile with the fact that former President Donald Trump was responsible for inciting the riots .Asked why Johnson and Carlson were pushing revisionist history, Louis said, “This is the final act of the Trump administration ” and that the ex-president’s loyalists are “trying once more to.

Congress affirmed President-elect Joe Biden's 2020 election victory after a pro-Trump mob assaulted the Capitol yesterday. Federal prosecutors are looking into everyone involved in the unrest, including the role President Trump played in inciting the crowd. A growing number of Republican leaders and Cabinet officials told CNN they believe Trump should be removed from office before Jan. “What happened at the U.S. Capitol yesterday was an insurrection against the United States, incited by the president. This president should not hold office one day longer ," Schumer said in the statement.

"Based on everything the House community has experienced since early January, it is apparent that [employee assistance] services are in high demand," Szpindor said.

After leaving a rally that then-President Donald Trump, who had refused to concede the election to rival Joe Biden, thousands of Trump supporters attacked the Capitol, attempting to stop the election certification. Nearly 250 people have been arrested so far, as the FBI seeks more information from the public.

The U.S. House and Senate have both begun hearing directly from law enforcement about the response that day and the officials who have been responsible for the aftermath, which included clearing mountains of debris, blood, feces and paint from the inaugural stage that was under construction on the Capitol steps at the time.

"We were committed to, and ensured that, the Electoral College certification process could continue on January 6," Brett Blanton, architect of the Capitol, testified Wednesday.

Capitol Police chief: Intelligence suggests militias aim to 'blow up' building when Biden addresses Congress

  Capitol Police chief: Intelligence suggests militias aim to 'blow up' building when Biden addresses Congress There is new intelligence suggesting militia groups have expressed a desire to "blow up" the Capitol building and "kill as many members as possible" on the day President Biden addresses Congress, U.S. Capitol Police Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman revealed Thursday during a House hearing regarding the Jan. 6 insurrection."We know that members of the militia groups that were present on Jan. 6 have stated their desires that they want to blow up the Capitol and kill as many members as possible with a direct nexus to the State of the Union, which we know that date has not been identified," Pittman said before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch.

Security officials testifying at Congress ' first hearing on the deadly siege of the Capitol cast blame and pointed fingers on Tuesday but also acknowledged they were woefully unprepared for the violence. Senators drilled down on the stunning security failure and missed warning signs as rioters loyal to former President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, in a misguided attempt to stop lawmakers from certifying President Joe Biden's election. Five people died in the attack, including a Capitol Police officer.

Thousands of unmasked rioters at the nation's Capitol on Wednesday flouted public health guidelines in what experts have said may become a prime example of a coronavirus superspreader event. Public health officials will not know for weeks exactly how many new COVID cases are linked to the Capitol Hill riots , but they say the riots could turn out to be a super spreader event. "I am very concerned," Dr. Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at the Georgetown Center for Global Health Science and Security, told ABC News.

Also among the damage: marble and granite busts of Speakers Joe Cannon, Champ Clark, Joe Martin and Thomas Brackett Reed; portraits of James Madison and John Quincy Adams; a bust of Chippewa statesman Be shekee; and a statue of Thomas Jefferson. But it could have been much worse, Farar Elliott, curator for the U.S. House, told lawmakers.

"During the riot, courageous staffers saved several important artifacts of the House's legislative history," she testified. "Quick thinking by a journal clerk secured the House's 1819 silver inkstand, the oldest object in the Chamber."

Wednesday's hearing was a stark departure from one the day before, where the three top law enforcement officials at the Capitol on the day of the attack — Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, House sergeant-at-arms Paul Irving and Senate sergeant-at-arms Michael Stenger — appeared to give conflicting testimony about how law enforcement had prepared for the anticipated protest and what intel they had access to. All three resigned in the days after the siege.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, has suggested a 9/11-style commission to fully investigate the Capitol attack, but Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell accused the plan of being partisan in nature.

Lawyer From Capitol Riot Says He Would Die in Fight For Freedom About Election Results

  Lawyer From Capitol Riot Says He Would Die in Fight For Freedom About Election Results "I will not go quietly until I draw my last breath," attorney Paul Davis wrote in response to questions surrounding his appearance outside the Capitol during the riot.In December, Paul Davis replied to a tweet from former President Donald Trump calling to his supporters to the Capitol on January 6. "Never stop fighting Mr. President! Never give in no matter how ugly it gets! We are willing to die to preserve our freedom!" Davis tweeted.

"We could do something narrow that looks at the Capitol, or we could potentially do something broader to analyze the full scope of the political violence problem in this country," he said from the Senate floor on Wednesday. "We cannot land at some artificial, politicized halfway point."

Acting Chief Of Police Yogananda D. Pittman, who oversaw Protective &

Intelligence Operations at the time, will be the next to give lawmakers insight into what happened and what should be changed when she appears at a hearing Thursday. Pittman will testify that security had been beefed up for January 6 because the agency's intelligence division, with its law enforcement partners in the FBI, determined that it was more likely to become violent and intense than previous marches had been. But the efforts ultimately were not enough.

"While the Department was prepared to neutralize and remove individuals or groups engaging in civil disobedience or violence among the demonstrators, it was quickly overwhelmed by the thousands of insurrectionists (many armed) who immediately and without provocation began attacking officers, bypassing physical barriers, and refusing to comply with lawful orders," Pittman will tell lawmakers, based on a written copy of her opening remarks. "The Department's preparations were based on the information it gathered from its law enforcement partners like the FBI and others within the intelligence community, none of which indicated that a mass insurrection of this scale would occur at the U.S. Capitol on January 6."

Eric Swalwell's Lawsuit Against Trump Has 'Mind-Boggling' Implications, Says Alan Dershowitz

  Eric Swalwell's Lawsuit Against Trump Has 'Mind-Boggling' Implications, Says Alan Dershowitz Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell filed a lawsuit against Donald Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Rudy Giuliani and Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), for inciting the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. The civil lawsuit was filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., and accused Trump and his allies of "inciting an attack against the Capitol that terrorized lawmakers and prevented us from doing our jobs of certifying the votes of the American people."In the lawsuit, Swalwell alleges that Trump, Trump Jr., Giuliani and Brooks prompted the violent siege with their repeated claims of voter fraud, their encouragement that supporters come to D.C.

More officers were added to the standard details for members of leadership and agents were posted at certain potentially-targeted members' homes, among other measures.

On the morning of Trump's rally, less than two miles away from the Capitol, undercover agents surveyed the crowds and evacuation transportation was arranged at the Capitol for leaders, in case they would be needed. CPD also prepared additional crowd-control measures, including pepper balls and protective shields.

"Despite the adjustment in its operations...the department was not prepared for the massive groups of violent insurrectionists that descended on the U.S. Capitol," Pittman plans to testify.

Related Articles

  • Trump's Impeachment Trial Briefly Derailed, But Both Sides Agree to Move to Vote
  • Ex-Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund Says He Never Saw Intel Report Warning About Jan. 6 Threat
  • Mike Pence Keeps Quiet As His Safety During Capitol Riot Becomes A Focal Point in Trump's Trial

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FBI Director Shoots Back, Insisting Bureau Shared Intel Ahead of Capitol Insurrection .
FBI Director Christopher Wray, pushing back against the Capitol and D.C. police, insisted on Tuesday that his agents shared intelligence with them “in three ways” ahead of the Jan. 6 insurrection. Making his first substantial public comments on the FBI’s performance since an attack he called “domestic terrorism,” Wray told the Senate Judiciary Committee that the FBI had provided a now-infamous “situational information report” from its Norfolk bureau to D.C.

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