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World Fact Check: Did Ex-Capitol Chief Testify He Had Intel that Antifa Would Attack Capitol?

02:17  25 february  2021
02:17  25 february  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Fact Check: Did 'Fake Trump Protesters' Organize Attack on the Capitol?

  Fact Check: Did 'Fake Trump Protesters' Organize Attack on the Capitol? On Tuesday, FBI Director Christopher Wray, a Trump appointee, testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee about the events of January 6.On Tuesday, FBI Director Christopher Wray, an appointee of former President Donald Trump, testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee about the events that day.

Even after ex - Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund admitted it to be true, both mainstream media and Democrats are busy calling it a debunked fake news story. In testimony on Capitol Hill today, Sund acknowledged that Antifa was not only there but that police had intel beforehand that Antifa was coming. Are we just not going to talk about the fact Capitol Police Chief Sund said he had intel that Antifa was part of the Jan 6 attack ? — Jack Posobiec 🇺🇸 (@JackPosobiec) February 23, 2021.

Former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund — who said he regrets resigning in the riot's aftermath — testified that he requested assistance from National Guard troops two days before the attack , but was shot down by former House sergeant-at-arms Paul Irving because of concerns about "optics." More than 200 people have been arrested in the seven weeks since the Capitol riot. But little is still known about them as individuals and how exactly they were radicalized. Ben Tracy talks to a Virginia woman struggling with her father's role at the Capitol as she tries to repair a relationship torn apart by politics.

The Senate's first joint committee hearing on the Capitol attack on Tuesday featured testimony from Capitol security officials, including former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, who resigned in January.

Josh Hawley wearing a suit and tie: Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) speaks during a joint hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee and the Senate Rules Committee in Washington, D.C. on February 23, 2021. © Andrew Harnik/Getty Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) speaks during a joint hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee and the Senate Rules Committee in Washington, D.C. on February 23, 2021.

Sund and others recounted the turbulence of January 6 in detail, including delays at the Pentagon after multiple requests for backup as well as what senators called "intelligence failures." The ex-chief defended the U.S. Capitol Police, blaming the pandemonium on a lack of "accurate and complete intelligence" across federal agencies.

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  House Administrative Official Tells Congress Mental Impact of Capitol Riot Could Be Long-lasting Nearly two months after a mob of angry Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, members of Congress are beginning to dive into the fallout from an attack that left five people dead and many more injured. © Samuel Corum/Getty Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election.

He alleged Irving told him that he was concerned about the “optics” of having Guard troops present and rebuffed him .Irving countered by saying he had no recollection of Sund calling him at that time, saying he was on the House floor overseeing the Electoral College certification process. 6.“Although it appears that there were numerous participants from multiple states planning this attack , the entire intelligence community seems to have missed it,” claimed Sund. “Without the intelligence to properly prepare, the USCP was significantly outnumbered and left to defend the Capitol against an extremely

"Evidence growing that fascist ANTIFA orchestrated Capitol attack with clever mob control tactics," Brooks, an Alabama Republican, tweeted Thursday morning. "This has all the hallmarks of Antifa provocation," Gosar, an Arizona Republican, wrote Wednesday. Gaetz was more specific Facts First: None of this is true. The firm cited by the Washington Times has told two news outlets the story is false. The Federal Bureau of Investigation said there is no indication, as of Friday, that Antifa infiltrated the mob. Furthermore, right-wing extremists have been identified in the crowd that stormed the Capitol

The Claim

Mention of Antifa, a frequent scapegoat of President Donald Trump and his supporters for the Capitol riot, also made it into Sund's testimony.

Conservative activist Jack Posobiec asked why no one was discussing Sund's alleged testimony that the Capitol Police "had intel that Antifa was part of the Jan 6 attack."

He tweeted: "Are we just not going to talk about the fact Capitol Police Chief Sund said he had intel that Antifa was part of the Jan 6 attack?"

The Facts

Tuesday's testimony focused largely on a breakdown of intelligence and communication that Capitol security officials said rendered them helpless against rioters on January 6. Sund described an hours-long lag in backup from the Pentagon after a request for support from the National Guard, and in the days preceding the riots, a lack of preparedness by the intelligence community.

Attack on Capitol Hill: No infiltrating antifa activists among Trump supporters, according to FBI boss

 Attack on Capitol Hill: No infiltrating antifa activists among Trump supporters, according to FBI boss Heard before Congress, Christopher Wray defended the work of the FBI and brushed aside a lingering conspiracy theory © Mandel Ngan / AP / SIPA FBI boss Christopher Wray heard before a US Senate committee on the attack on the Capitol, March 2, 2021.

Ex - Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund said he had prepared for a protest, not "a military-style coordinated assault". Four people died after pro-Trump protesters stormed the US Capitol . He denied reports that officials did not want military troops at the Capitol out of concern that it would generate bad publicity. His account appeared to be in direct conflict with Mr Sund, who testified that Mr Irving had "stated he was concerned about the 'optics' of having National Guard present".

Fact check : NPR posted story early, updated live amid Capitol riot. Claims that NPR posted a story about rioters in the U.S. Capitol hours before the attack took place are missing context. The story was a live feed, first posted at 9:33 a.m., and updated throughout the day. Published Jan. A man at the Capitol riot did not die from a heart attack after accidentally tasing himself in the testicles. Reports state that the man had high blood pressure and died after he fell to the sidewalk outside the Capitol . published Jan.

Sund and his colleagues explained that as consumers of intelligence, the Capitol police rely on information from the FBI, Homeland Security and others to create security plans. But Sund said that no new intelligence was presented during a January 5 meeting.

He said that he and his colleagues anticipated that what would become known as the Capitol attacks would be similar to previous MAGA rallies. Sund also said that intelligence assessments listed groups expected to be present in Washington, D.C. that day.

"As previously mentioned, the IICD intelligence assessment indicated that the January 6th protests/rallies were "expected to be similar to the previous Million MAGA March rallies in November and December 2020, which drew tens of thousands of participants," Sund said.

"The assessment indicated that members of the Proud Boys, white supremacist groups, Antifa, and other extremist groups were expected to participate on January 6, and that it may be inclined to become violent," Sund added.

The NAACP is suing Trump, Giuliani, and 2 extremist groups for inciting the violent Capitol riot

  The NAACP is suing Trump, Giuliani, and 2 extremist groups for inciting the violent Capitol riot The NAACP is suing Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani for their alleged connection to the Capitol riot. The suit also named the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers as defendants. It accuses them of violating the Klu Klux Klan Act by conspiring to incite a riot. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. A Mississippi congressman and the NAACP have filed suit against former President Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani, and two extremist groups in connection to the January 6 Capitol insurrection. The suit was brought on behalf of Rep.

Former Capitol security and police officials testifying before a joint Senate panel hearing described their surprise at the scale of the coordinated attack by actors with violent intent and acknowledged their officers were not trained on how to respond to an infiltration of the Capitol building, with many not Capitol Police Capt. Carneysha Mendoza gave senators a harrowing account of officers'hours-long battle with rioters that day, during which she took command of the scene in the Rotunda as an leader within the department's Special Operations Division. The Missouri native said she still had chemical

The now-former officials responsible for Capitol security on Jan. 6 testified Tuesday that they did not receive an FBI threat report warning that extremists were planning to travel to Washington to commit violence and "war."Why it matters: The testimony by former U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, former House Sergeant at Arms Paul Irving, and former Senate Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger came during the first in a series of congressional oversight hearings that will examine the security and law enforcement failures that led to the Jan.

He said that the Intelligence and Inter-Agency Coordination Division Daily Intelligence Report also assessed the chance of "civil disobedience" as "remote" to "improbable."

Intelligence reports leading up to January 6 name Antifa, a decentralized left-wing protest movement, as potential attendees at the planned rally that day and that they could "become violent," which the report assessed based on fights that occurred between groups at previous MAGA rallies. Sund did not say he had intelligence Antifa members were or would be responsible for the violence that occurred at the Capitol.

The Ruling

False.

Sund testified that a report from the Intelligence and Inter-Agency Coordination Division provided before January 6 listed Antifa as expected participants in the rally taking place that day, meaning the intelligence community expected members to be present in Washington, D.C.

The report predicted Antifa and other groups could become violent, similar to November 2020's Million MAGA March in Washington, D.C., but officials did not anticipate an attack on the Capitol.

First Capitol Riot Hearing Only Raised More Questions About Jan. 6

  First Capitol Riot Hearing Only Raised More Questions About Jan. 6 Nearly seven weeks after the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, the people tasked with protecting the building on Jan. 6 testified for the first time about the failures that allowed a pro-Trump mob to overrun the seat of American government in an unprecedented disruption of democracy. But nearly every answer they gave about what happened that day just raised more questions. Over the course of four hours, the former chief of the U.S. Capitol Police, and the former security heads of the House and Senate, largely pointed the finger at each other—or blamed others not present at the hearing—and, above all, minimized their own failures.

Capitol police did not have intelligence predicting the storming of the Capitol, much less that Antifa would be part of the riot.

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Capitol Police chief: Intelligence suggests militias aim to 'blow up' building when Biden addresses Congress .
There is new intelligence suggesting militia groups have expressed a desire to "blow up" the Capitol building and "kill as many members as possible" on the day President Biden addresses Congress, U.S. Capitol Police Acting Chief Yogananda Pittman revealed Thursday during a House hearing regarding the Jan. 6 insurrection."We know that members of the militia groups that were present on Jan. 6 have stated their desires that they want to blow up the Capitol and kill as many members as possible with a direct nexus to the State of the Union, which we know that date has not been identified," Pittman said before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch.

usr: 1
This is interesting!