•   
  •   

World Over 400 Evangelical Leaders Condemn 'Heresy of Christian Nationalism' After Capitol Attack

02:54  25 february  2021
02:54  25 february  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

6 Oath Keepers extremists who guarded Roger Stone before the Capitol riot joined the siege: NY Times report

  6 Oath Keepers extremists who guarded Roger Stone before the Capitol riot joined the siege: NY Times report 6 men who guarded Roger Stone in DC stormed the Capitol,The New York Times found. All of those guards are reportedly associated with the Oath Keepers, a militant extremist group. Some Oath Keepers planned for the insurrection, according to court documents obtained by Insider. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Six people who guarded Roger Stone in Washington, DC, before the January 6 Capitol riot participated in the insurrection, according to an investigation by The New York Times.

Hundreds of evangelical Christian leaders have condemned the "heresy of Christian nationalism," which they believe has led to political extremism and helped spur the pro-Trump insurrection against the U.S. Capitol on January 6.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Pro-Trump protesters gather outside the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6 in Washington, D.C. ahead of a riot during which many of the former president's supporters violently attacked the legislative building. © Tasos Katopodis/Getty Pro-Trump protesters gather outside the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6 in Washington, D.C. ahead of a riot during which many of the former president's supporters violently attacked the legislative building.

White evangelical Christians have been a key base of support for former President Donald Trump since his 2016 presidential campaign, with about eight in 10 voters from the religious demographic voting for Trump in 2016 and again in 2020. During the January 6 attack against the U.S. Capitol by a mob of the president's supporters, many carried Christian banners or symbols as prominent evangelical Christian leaders promoted Trump's false claims that widespread voter fraud led to President Joe Biden's electoral victory ahead of the riot.

The NAACP is suing Trump, Giuliani, and 2 extremist groups for inciting the violent Capitol riot

  The NAACP is suing Trump, Giuliani, and 2 extremist groups for inciting the violent Capitol riot The NAACP is suing Donald Trump and Rudy Giuliani for their alleged connection to the Capitol riot. The suit also named the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers as defendants. It accuses them of violating the Klu Klux Klan Act by conspiring to incite a riot. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. A Mississippi congressman and the NAACP have filed suit against former President Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani, and two extremist groups in connection to the January 6 Capitol insurrection. The suit was brought on behalf of Rep.

Although many evangelical Christians appear to remain largely supportive of the former president, some progressive evangelical leaders are attempting to push back against the radicalization. Pastor Doug Pagitt, the leader of the evangelical progressive group Vote Common Good, organized the open letter signed by over 400 Christian leaders (as of the time of writing) condemning the rise in Christian nationalism.

Pagitt told Newsweek on Wednesday that "just watching the insurrection and how much it was fueled by the religious Christian movement, and the Christian nationalist movement" led him and his organization to launch the open-letter initiative.

"We recognize the damage done by radicalized Christian Nationalism in the world, the church, and in the lives of individuals and communities. We know from experts on radicalization that one of the key elements is a belief that your actions are 'blessed by God' and ordained by your faith. This is what allows so many people who hold to a Christian Nationalism view to be radicalized," the letter says.

Judge Denies Release of Capitol Rioter Who Argued Lack of Cellphone Made Him Less of a Threat

  Judge Denies Release of Capitol Rioter Who Argued Lack of Cellphone Made Him Less of a Threat Emanuel Jackson allegedly hit police officers with a baseball bat and a judge ruled there were no release conditions that could ensure the safety of the community or law enforcement.There are more than 180 cases against alleged Capitol rioters and prosecutors are increasingly citing the possibility of a future threat when pushing judges to deny their requests for pretrial release. In arguing for his release, Jackson, 20, pointed to the fact he turned himself in to law enforcement, has no criminal history and that communicating with people planning future riots could be challenging for him.

The evangelical leaders drew a comparison to prominent Muslim leaders condemning Islamist extremism.

"Just as many Muslim leaders have felt the need to denounce distorted, violent versions of their faith, we feel the urgent need to denounce this violent mutation of our faith. What we saw manifest itself in the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6, 2021, is a threat to our democracy, but it is also a threat to orthodox Christian faith," they write.

The signatories went on to urge "all pastors, ministers, and priests to boldly make it clear that a commitment to Jesus Christ is incompatible with calls to violence, support of white Christian nationalism, conspiracy theories, and all religious and racial prejudice."

Pagitt told Newsweek that he's optimistic that many evangelical leaders will begin taking a stand against conspiracy theories and Christian nationalism in the wake of the events of January 6. "We're hopeful that this is going to be a rallying cry," he said, touting the positive response the open letter has received thus far. Pagitt said they just want evangelicals to "choose the way of faith, hope and love."

House Administrative Official Tells Congress Mental Impact of Capitol Riot Could Be Long-lasting

  House Administrative Official Tells Congress Mental Impact of Capitol Riot Could Be Long-lasting Nearly two months after a mob of angry Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, members of Congress are beginning to dive into the fallout from an attack that left five people dead and many more injured. © Samuel Corum/Getty Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election.

"Most often people don't stop believing something. What we all do is we swap a belief, one for the other," Pagitt said. "And until you give someone another option and show them that the one they're holding is not doing them well, they stay with that belief even if that belief is really harmful to them."

The pastor suggested that many faith leaders have previously remained silent, wanting to stay out of politics. However, Pagitt is hopeful that this will change going forward as many see the dangers of extremism.

Other Christian groups, such as Faithful America, have pushing back against Trump and other right-wing political leaders as well. Faithful America describes itself as the largest online community of Christians fighting for social justice. The activists regularly put out petitions signed by thousands of Christians condemning the actions of right-wing lawmakers and the evangelical leaders that often support them.

But surveys prior to the insurrection showed that the vast majority of white evangelical Christians continued to back Trump, because he championed key conservative causes such as opposing reproductive and LGBTQ rights.

Fact Check: Did Ex-Capitol Chief Testify He Had Intel that Antifa Would Attack Capitol?

  Fact Check: Did Ex-Capitol Chief Testify He Had Intel that Antifa Would Attack Capitol? The Senate's first joint committee hearing on the Capitol attack on Tuesday featured testimony from Capitol security officials, including former Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, who resigned in January. © Andrew Harnik/Getty Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) speaks during a joint hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee and the Senate Rules Committee in Washington, D.C. on February 23, 2021. Sund and others recounted the turbulence of January 6 in detail, including delays at the Pentagon after multiple requests for backup as well as what senators called "intelligence failures.

Polling conducted by the Pew Research Center last autumn ahead of the November election showed that 78 percent of white evangelical Protestant Christians planned to vote for Trump while just 17 percent would support Biden. Exit polls showed similar results, with between 76 percent and 81 percent of the religious demographic voting for the former president.

Related Articles

  • White Evangelicals Are More Likely to Believe in QAnon Than Any Other Faith Group, Poll Finds
  • Televangelist Says Trump Lost Because God 'Got Weary' of Ex-President Promoting Himself
  • Prominent Evangelical Leader Calls Out 'Absolute Wedding of Politics and Faith' in U.S.
  • Over 16,000 Christians Want Franklin Graham Fired for 'Helping Incite' Capitol Riot

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

March 4th Capitol Attack Fears Grow as Conspiracy Theorists Talk of Trump's Return .
QAnon believers think Trump will arrive on March 4th to finally execute the long-awaited "storm"—that is, ordering mass arrests and executions of satanic pedophilies who are part of the "deep state."On Wednesday, the United States Capitol Police (USCP) announced that they had uncovered threats by militia groups to breach the Capitol building on March 4. The "possible plot" appeared to be connected to the QAnon theory that Trump would return to office on that date, when presidents were inaugurated pre-1933.

usr: 7
This is interesting!