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World 57% of Those Who Won't Get COVID Vaccine Say They Generally Avoid Them: Poll

04:02  06 march  2021
04:02  06 march  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Serious COVID Vaccine Side Effects Still Rare As 65 Million Shots Given: 'Fantastic'

  Serious COVID Vaccine Side Effects Still Rare As 65 Million Shots Given: 'Fantastic' Experts told Newsweek it is increasingly unlikely that more serious side effects from the COVID vaccine will emerge as the rollout continues.The benefits of being vaccinated against COVID outweigh any risk of serious side-effects, scientists have told Newsweek, as the number of people safely inoculated continues to rise with few reports of serious adverse effects such as severe allergic reactions.

Poll responses also appear to varied by demographic. Sixty percent of those age 65 and older said they would try to get a vaccine . The hesitancy of many people to get a Covid -19 vaccine when it becomes available is an issue that needs to be urgently addressed, National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins said in September. " Those who are vaccine hesitant have had their hesitancy enhanced by a variety of things that are happening right now, particularly the unfortunate mix of science and politics," Collins said at an event hosted by the National Academies of Sciences

7.Currently, there are two COVID vaccines available in the United States—Pfizer and Moderna. Both shots offer a full list of their ingredients on the FDA site.When specifically asked about shellfish allergies, Marks said that this was "not a reason not to get vaccinated ." However, he did say that you should tell your provider if you have this allergy or any other, as "all the providers that are giving the vaccine right now are prepared to deal with allergic reactions, and you should tell them , so that they might take a little bit more precaution."These precautions include monitoring these patients a little

Recent polling has found that among the 30 percent of Americans who do not plan on getting a COVID-19 vaccine, 57 percent generally avoid vaccines altogether.

a person wearing a mask: Recent polling has found that among the 30 percent of Americans who do not plan on getting a COVID-19 vaccine, 57 percent generally avoid vaccines altogether. In this January 13, 2021 photo, Safeway pharmacist Preston Young fills a syringe with Moderna COVID-19 vaccination during a drive-thru COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa, California. © Justin Sullivan/Getty Recent polling has found that among the 30 percent of Americans who do not plan on getting a COVID-19 vaccine, 57 percent generally avoid vaccines altogether. In this January 13, 2021 photo, Safeway pharmacist Preston Young fills a syringe with Moderna COVID-19 vaccination during a drive-thru COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa, California.

The survey, which questioned 10,121 U.S. adults from February 16 to 21, 2021, found that 30 percent—roughly 3,036 individuals—said they don't plan on getting a COVID-19 vaccine. These individuals provided various reasons for their refusal.

Are White 'Vaccine Chasers' the Reason People of Color Aren't Getting Their COVID-19 Shots?

  Are White 'Vaccine Chasers' the Reason People of Color Aren't Getting Their COVID-19 Shots? Black and brown Los Angeles, California, residents—who are most likely to die from the coronavirus—are being vaccinated at low rates despite efforts to reach them.Veronica Sance was irate. For days, she'd been monitoring the sidewalk in front of a prime South Los Angeles COVID-19 vaccination site, Kedren Community Health Center. And she did not like what she was seeing.

"Do as we say , and you'll get a treat." Important to remember: " Getting back to normal" is a lie. By creating the idea that the vaccine is hard to come by, they also create the idea that anyone who gets their You can see this defeatist language taking hold in some hitherto staunch Covid sceptics. That quote: "Even if their intentions are correct, there's no reason to assume any of them have any

Vaccines are a technology that humanity has often relied on in the past to bring down the death toll of infectious diseases. Within less than 12 months after the beginning of the COVID -19 pandemic, several research teams rose to the challenge and developed vaccines that protect from SARS-CoV-2, the The following map and chart show the number of COVID -19 vaccination doses administered per 100 people within a given population. Note that this is counted as a single dose, and may not equal the total number of people vaccinated , depending on the specific dose regime as several available COVID

Roughly 89 percent voiced concern about side effects, and 85 percent said they thought the vaccines were developed and tested too quickly. About 80 percent said they wanted more information about how well the vaccines work, and 74 percent said they feel alarmed after seeing too many mistakes made by the medical care system in the past. Around 68 percent said they didn't think they needed the vaccine.

Lastly, 57 percent said that they don't generally get vaccines. This percentage represents around 1,730 people among the 3,036 individuals who said they wouldn't get vaccinated. The survey didn't ask these individuals about their personal vaccination histories.

If these statistics were applied to the estimated 255.2 billion adults in the U.S. population, that would mean that 76.5 million adults don't plan on getting vaccinated. Roughly 43.6 million people in that subset would avoid vaccinations as a general rule.

Single dose of Pfizer's Covid vaccine stops three-quarters of cases

  Single dose of Pfizer's Covid vaccine stops three-quarters of cases Asymptomatic screening of staff at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge showed the number of people testing positive fell from 0.8 per cent to 0.2 per cent 12 days after their injection. The 'very impressive' findings are another sign that the UK's gamble to delay the second dose in a bid to get wider coverage quicker has paid off.Curbing symptomless infections is crucial to stopping outbreaks from growing unknowingly because people who do not feel ill are less likely to self-isolate.

AP criticized for saying Covid vaccination WON ’ T bring life back to normal. People from all over the world have long been assured that mass vaccination would bring an end to restrictions. But nearly one year on from the start of the Covid -19 pandemic it has been claimed that life might not return to normal for at least several years – if ever. Vaccine hesitancy has become a growing concern for medical officials and public figures who support mass programs of Covid -19 vaccination , and a Pew Research report from December showed that 39 percent of Americans – over 100 million people – were

You won ’ t need any test to get your COVID vaccine , so if you’re told to by anyone other than your doctor Aaron Rodgers, who is "recently engaged" to Shailene Woodley, says he can't wait to be a father Experts say they would recommend any of the three vaccines and suggest that people get

The survey was conducted by the Pew Research Center Survey and has a margin of error of plus or minus 1.6 percentage points.

Epidemiologists estimate that 70 percent of the population will need to develop immunity in order to end the pandemic, whether through vaccinations or other means, according to Science Magazine.

People who oppose receiving vaccines often fear negative health effects, feel suspiciously of medical authorities or haven't had their concerns addressed by the information available on the websites of the World Health Organization (WHO) or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A smaller number may oppose vaccination for religious reasons or fear that vaccinations won't protect them from disease.

Heidi Larson, director of the Vaccine Confidence Project at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, told Nature that the pro-vaccine community must do a better job of reaching out to anti-vaccination communities to be "responsive to the narratives that are out there among the undecided."

How the Johnson & Johnson single-dose COVID-19 vaccine is different from others

  How the Johnson & Johnson single-dose COVID-19 vaccine is different from others There is a new vaccine approved in the United States and it has one major difference which is hoped to speed up the immunisation of the country.The US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) cleared the vaccine produced by medical giant Johnson & Johnson.

Fauci said that scientists were accelerating the vaccine development process “which I must emphasize is not at the expense of safety nor at the expense of scientific integrity. “I still think that we have a good chance, if all the things fall in the right place, that we might have a vaccine Dr Francis Collins, who directs the National Institutes of Health, insisted safety was the top priority. The NIH is creating a master plan for testing the leading Covid -19 vaccine candidates in tens of thousands of people, to prove if they really work and also if they ’re safe. “I would not want people to think that we’re cutting corners

Those patients, though, should be told about the unknown risks. Parikh said they may also want to, but are not required to, check in with their doctors. Since there is not enough data yet on the safety of Covid -19 vaccines in pregnant women, it's up to them if they want to get the vaccine , according to Dr. Peter Marks, the director of the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. " Covid -19 in a pregnant woman is not a good thing, so someone might decide that they would like to be vaccinated , but that 's not something that we're recommending at this time," Marks said at a news briefing

She believes anti-vaccination advocates use personalized, emotive messages that appeal to people's empathy ("Do you love your children?") rather than fear ("Vaccines will kill you."). The pro-vaccination movement must do the same, she said, by using videos and first-person testimonies that appeal to emotions rather than just share medical facts.

"We need to get better at storytelling," said Noel Brewer, a behavioral scientist at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill told Nature. "We need to carry positive stories and also negative stories about the harms of not vaccinating."

Newsweek contacted the CDC for comment.

Newsweek, in partnership with NewsGuard, is dedicated to providing accurate and verifiable vaccine and health information. With NewsGuard's HealthGuard browser extension, users can verify if a website is a trustworthy source of health information. Visit the Newsweek VaxFacts website to learn more and to download the HealthGuard browser extension.

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Poll: Most Americans support restrictions on unvaccinated people .
Over half of Americans believe that unvaccinated people should not be allowed back in the office or use public spaces.The national opinion poll conducted by Reuters/Ipsos found that 54 percent of respondents said they were “very interested” in getting vaccinated. That was up from a January survey, when 41 percent expressed the same level of interest, and 38 percent in a May 2020 poll before a coronavirus vaccine was developed.

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