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World Myanmar asks India to return police who fled coup

23:56  06 march  2021
23:56  06 march  2021 Source:   bbc.com

Scuffles in Yangon as Facebook bans all Myanmar military accounts

  Scuffles in Yangon as Facebook bans all Myanmar military accounts Pro-military demonstrators punch bystanders after people in the area bang pots and pans to show their disapproval.Pro-military demonstrators rallying in Yangon, the country’s biggest city, punched several bystanders, according to local media, after anti-coup demonstrators and residents banged pots and pans and crossed their wrists to express their disapproval of the rally.

Myanmar has asked neighbouring India to return several police officers who crossed the border seeking refuge after refusing to carry out orders.

a group of people riding on the back of a helmet: Fresh clashes broke out between police and protesters in Yangon on Saturday © EPA Fresh clashes broke out between police and protesters in Yangon on Saturday

Indian officials said the officers and their families had crossed the border in recent days.

In a letter, Myanmar authorities asked for their return "in order to uphold friendly relations".

Myanmar has been gripped by mass protests and strikes following a military coup last month.

Security forces have taken a hard line against the demonstrations and at least 55 deaths have been reported.

At least 18 protesters were killed amid intensifying pro-democracy demonstrations in Myanmar

  At least 18 protesters were killed amid intensifying pro-democracy demonstrations in Myanmar The protesters were shot and killed by the military government, according to the UN.For nearly a month, a growing coalition of protesters has demanded the end of military rule in Myanmar, following a coup that led to the arrest of the nation’s civilian leaders on February 1. Demonstrations have taken place continuously across the country, taking the form of student protests, the halting of public transportation, and work stoppages that threaten to derail Myanmar’s economy.

On Saturday protesters continued to defy the military, gathering across the country. In the largest city, Yangon, police used tear gas, rubber bullets and stun grenades to disperse crowds, reports said.

There were no reports of fresh casualties.

  • Myanmar coup: What is happening and why?

Deputy Commissioner Maria CT Zuali, a senior official in Champhai district in the Indian state of Mizoram, told Reuters news agency that she had received a letter from her counterpart in Myanmar's Falam district requesting the return of the police officers.

The letter said that Myanmar had information about eight police officers who had crossed into India.

"In order to uphold friendly relations between the two neighbour countries, you are kindly requested to detain eight Myanmar police personnel who had arrived to Indian territories and hand-over to Myanmar," the letter read.

Myanmar police break up protests as ASEAN diplomatic effort stalls

  Myanmar police break up protests as ASEAN diplomatic effort stalls Myanmar police break up protests as ASEAN diplomatic effort stallsForeign Ministers from Southeast Asian neighbours urged restraint but failed to unite behind a call for the military to release ousted government leader Aung San Suu Kyi and restore democracy.

Aung San Suu Kyi et al. on a sidewalk: Protesters are demanding the release of democratically elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi © EPA Protesters are demanding the release of democratically elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi

Ms Zuali said she was awaiting instructions from India's home affairs ministry in Delhi.

According to Reuters, about 30 people including the officers and their family members have crossed the border into India seeking refuge in recent days.

On Saturday, scores of other Myanmar nationals were waiting at the border hoping to flee the turmoil, AFP news agency reported, citing Indian officials.

How did the unrest start?

Myanmar's military seized power at the beginning of February after detaining the democratically elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi.

Days later, a civil disobedience movement began, with many people refusing to return to work and some taking part in huge street protests.

Myanmar's security forces responded with a violent crackdown - firing live rounds at unarmed protesters. The military has not commented on the deaths.

Myanmar coup leaders tried draining $1bn from US account: Sources

  Myanmar coup leaders tried draining $1bn from US account: Sources An executive order from US President Joe Biden gave the green light to block the transfer indefinitely, Reuters reports.The transaction on February 4 in the name of the Central Bank of Myanmar was first blocked by Fed safeguards. US government officials then stalled on approving the transfer until an executive order issued by US President Joe Biden gave them legal authority to block it indefinitely, sources told Reuters.

More than 1,700 people have been detained since the coup, according to UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet, including members of parliament, protesters, and at least 29 journalists.

Ms Bachelet said the figures could be much higher due to the large scale of the protests and difficulty in monitoring developments.

Myanmar in profile

  • Myanmar, also known as Burma, became independent from Britain in 1948. For much of its modern history it has been under military rule
  • Restrictions began loosening from 2010 onwards, leading to free elections in 2015 and the installation of a government led by veteran opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi the following year
  • In 2017, Myanmar's army responded to attacks on police by Rohingya militants with a deadly crackdown, driving more than half a million Rohingya Muslims across the border into Bangladesh in what the UN later called a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing"
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Myanmar military ‘murdered’ at least 70 since coup: UN .
UN special rapporteur suggests ‘crimes against humanity’ being committed; calls for sanctions on military-owned firms.Talking about “a horrible truth”, human rights investigator Thomas Andrews told the UN Human Rights Council on Thursday that “the country of Myanmar is being controlled by a murderous, illegal regime”.

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