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World Myanmar protesters stage rallies as army accused of using battle tactics

08:06  11 march  2021
08:06  11 march  2021 Source:   reuters.com

ASEAN set for talks with Myanmar military as crisis escalates

  ASEAN set for talks with Myanmar military as crisis escalates Foreign ministers will call for Aung San Suu Kyi’s release encourage talks between the civilian leader and the army.Singapore’s foreign minister Vivian Balakrishnan, in a televised interview late on Monday, said the Association of Southeast Asian Nations will tell the military it is appalled by the violence in Myanmar and call for the release of the country’s elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and for the two sides to talk.

Protesters across Myanmar have held a general strike, taking to the streets across the country and shutting many businesses, in one of the largest nationwide shows of opposition to the military since it seized power three weeks ago. In a broadcast on the state-run MRTV on Sunday night, the army accused protesters of “ inciting the people, especially emotional teenagers and youths, to a confrontation path where they will suffer the loss of life”. On Monday morning, huge crowds of protesters marched regardless.

MANDALAY, Myanmar — Protesters against the military takeover in Myanmar carried homemade shields and moved with more caution and agility Tuesday, adapting their tactics to the escalating violence from security forces not reluctant to use lethal force to break up crowds. The crackdown has left more than 60 protesters dead but has failed to slow the widespread protests against the Feb. 1 coup that ousted the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi. A school principal involved in the protest movement died Tuesday from unknown causes after being taken into custody by security

(Reuters) - Protesters took to the streets in several parts of Myanmar on Thursday, defying an increasingly brutal crackdown by security forces that rights group Amnesty International says are now adopting battle tactics against demonstrators.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People take part in a sit-in protest in Mandalay © Reuters/OBTAINED BY REUTERS People take part in a sit-in protest in Mandalay a group of people on a busy street: FILE PHOTO: Police stand on a road during an anti-coup protest in Mandalay © Reuters/STRINGER FILE PHOTO: Police stand on a road during an anti-coup protest in Mandalay

More than 60 protesters have been killed and some 2,000 people have been detained by security forces since the Feb. 1 coup against Aung San Suu Kyi's elected government, an advocacy group said.

Myanmar coup leaders tried draining $1bn from US account: Sources

  Myanmar coup leaders tried draining $1bn from US account: Sources An executive order from US President Joe Biden gave the green light to block the transfer indefinitely, Reuters reports.The transaction on February 4 in the name of the Central Bank of Myanmar was first blocked by Fed safeguards. US government officials then stalled on approving the transfer until an executive order issued by US President Joe Biden gave them legal authority to block it indefinitely, sources told Reuters.

The UN statement came as Amnesty International accused Myanmar security forces of using battlefield weapons on unarmed protesters and carrying out premeditated killings orchestrated by their commanding officers. International pressure on the Myanmar junta has mounted since the army ousted and detained civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi last month, triggering daily protests around the country. The United States also applied fresh pressure with sanctions against Aung Pyae Sone and Khin Thiri Thet Mon, two adult children of Myanmar junta leader Min Aung Hlaing.

Security forces have been accused of killing more than 50 people. Naing, who is a low-ranking officer from a town in the west of the country, says protests in his area began to escalate at the end of February. He says he ran, after refusing twice to fire at demonstrators. The UN, the US and a host of other countries have condemned the killing of civilians in the crackdown against anti-coup protesters in Myanmar , and called on the authorities to exercise restraint. The military has dismissed criticism of its actions and said it is ready to withstand sanctions and isolation after it seized power.

Social media posts showed pro-democracy protesters marching in the town of Tamu in Chin State on Thursday chanting: "Will we revolt or will we serve them? We will revolt."

A Reuters witness said there was also a small rally in the Sanchaung area of Yangon, a district where security forces this week fired guns and used stun grenades as they checked houses to hunt down protesters.

Overnight people defied a curfew to hold several more candle lit vigils in parts of Yangon and also in Myingyan, south west of the second city of Mandalay.

The U.N. Security Council on Wednesday condemned violence against protesters and urged the army to show restraint, but failed to denounce the military takeover as a coup or threaten further action due to opposition from China and Russia.

Myanmar’s Digital Insurgents Have Finally Found a Way to Hurt the Junta

  Myanmar’s Digital Insurgents Have Finally Found a Way to Hurt the Junta This story was produced in partnership with Coda Story. One month after Myanmar’s military seized power in a bloodless coup and declared a year-long state of emergency, daily protests continue to shake cities and towns across the country. Now, in addition to taking their anger to the streets, an underground movement of pro-democracy activists has unleashed a raft of new digital tools on the armed forces and police. Myanmar’s powerful militaryOne month after Myanmar’s military seized power in a bloodless coup and declared a year-long state of emergency, daily protests continue to shake cities and towns across the country.

Protesters against the military takeover in Myanmar carried homemade shields and moved with more caution and agility Tuesday, adapting their tactics to the escalating violence from security forces not reluctant to use lethal force to break up crowds. (AP Photo). That followed another restless night in parts of Yangon Tuesday, with security forces setting fire to protesters ' makeshift barricades in Thingangyun township, according to a 26-year-old resident who accused authorities of trying to incite fear. There were also tense scenes in the North Okkalapa area as about 100 protesters were arrested.

Protesters against the military takeover in Myanmar carried homemade shields and moved with more caution and agility Tuesday, adapting their tactics to the escalating violence from security forces not reluctant to use lethal force to break up crowds. Another group made a mobile protest , driving Anti-coup protesters hold makeshift shields during a demonstration in Yangon, Myanmar Tuesday, March 9, 2021. Demonstrators in Myanmar 's biggest city came out Monday night for their first mass protests in defiance of an 8 p.m. curfew, seeking to show support for an estimated 200 students trapped by

Amnesty International accused the army of using lethal force against protesters and said many killings documented amounted to extrajudicial executions.

"These are not the actions of overwhelmed, individual officers making poor decisions," said Joanne Mariner, Director of Crisis Response at Amnesty International.

"These are unrepentant commanders already implicated in crimes against humanity, deploying their troops and murderous methods in the open."

A junta spokesman declined to give an immediate comment, but said there would be a news conference held by the military's council in the capital Naypyitaw at 2 pm. (0730 GMT) on Thursday.

The junta has previously said it is acting with utmost restraint in handling what it describes as demonstrations by "riotous protesters" whom it accuses of attacking police and harming national security and stability.

Myanmar protests continue as UN urged to hear ‘desperate pleas’

  Myanmar protests continue as UN urged to hear ‘desperate pleas’ Crackdown on anti-coup protesters continues in Myanmar as UN envoy calls on Security Council to take immediate action.The Southeast Asian country has been in turmoil since a February 1 coup removed the democratically-elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi, triggering mass protests in cities across the country calling for the civilian administration’s restoration.

In the wake of last week's military coup in Myanmar , a young generation of protesters is cracking jokes at the army 's expense and winning fans on social media with colourful and witty signs. On Wednesday a group of young demonstrators help up signs while sitting in inflatable pools. Dr. Susan Moore, a physician battling COVID-19, documented what she described as poor and hostile treatment she received at an Indiana hospital because she was a Black woman. Her death highlighted an issue that’s persisted among medical professionals since as early as the era of slavery.

Thousands take to streets across Myanmar for third day as activists urge workers to stage a general strike and ‘tear down military dictatorship’. Authorities in Myanmar have threatened to take “action” against protesters who break the law as police fired water cannon at peaceful demonstrators in Naypyidaw and thousands of people took to the streets of major cities for a third day to denounce last week’s putsch. A statement read by an announcer on state-run MRTV on Monday said there had been violations of the law and threats of force by groups “ using the excuse of democracy and human rights”.

U.S. SANCTIONS GENERAL'S CHILDREN

State media said the junta had removed Arakan Army (AA) insurgents from its list of terrorist groups because the faction has stopped attacks and in order to help establish peace across the country.

The move comes at a time the army is struggling to contain daily protests against the coup.

The AA is fighting for greater autonomy in the western Rakhine state and had become one of the most formidable forces in challenging an army that has been fighting various ethnic wars for seven decades.

On Wednesday, security forces firing teargas and rubber bullets trapped hundreds of anti-junta protesters late into the night in two districts of Yangon.

Some protesters who managed to evade blockades set up by police in surrounding streets told of scores of arrests and said that some of those who got caught were beaten.

In a bid to increase pressure on the military as it continues its crackdown, the U.S. Treasury Department on Wednesday imposed sanctions on two children of military leader Min Aung Hlaing and six companies they control.

In New York, the United Nations Security Council condemned violence against peaceful protesters and called for the military to "exercise utmost restraint".

But language that would have condemned the coup and threatened possible further action was removed from the British-drafted text, due to opposition by China, Russia, India and Vietnam.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said he hoped the Security Council statement would push the military to realize it "is absolutely essential" that all prisoners are released and that the results of a November election are respected.

The army has justified the coup by saying that the election, won by Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy, was marred by fraud - an assertion rejected by the electoral commission. The junta has promised a new election within a year, but has not set a date.

(Reporting by Reuters Staff; Writing by Ed Davies; Editing by Lincoln Feast.)

Myanmar Buddhist group signals break with authorities after violent crackdown .
Myanmar Buddhist group signals break with authorities after violent crackdownIn its most forthright condemnation of the military's bloody crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrations, the government-appointed body also said in a draft statement its members intended to halt activities in an apparent protest.

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