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World Dramatic Pictures and Videos Show Worst Unrest in Northern Ireland Since Good Friday Agreement

01:01  09 april  2021
01:01  09 april  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Cars set on fire in Newtownabbey spark fears of further trouble in Northern Ireland

  Cars set on fire in Newtownabbey spark fears of further trouble in Northern Ireland Disturbances have broken out in Newtownabbey fuelling fears of another night of trouble ahead in Northern Ireland. Three cars were hijacked and set on fire in the loyalist O'Neill/Doagh Road area of Newtownabbey, on the outskirts of Belfast, on Saturday evening.A large crowd of onlookers gathered to watch the unrest unfold at the Cloughfern roundabout. Video footage showed cars being burned and a police van being targeted.The Police Federation for Northern Ireland has called for an end of the violence, saying people destroying their own communities is "not the way to protest or vent".

Scenes of chaos have emerged from Northern Ireland as it experienced another night in a week of unrest Wednesday in Belfast, the worst since the Good Friday Agreement was signed in 1998. A bus was hijacked and set on fire Wednesday in one of many instances of violence due to tensions mounting over Brexit and fueled by clashes between British protestant loyalist communities and Irish nationalist Catholics, according to the Associated Press, as Videos and photos on social media captured the attack on a Translink Metrobus in which petrol bombs were hurled at it by attackers before it caught fire.

Northern Ireland was plunged into crisis after violence escalated at the intersection between loyalist and nationalist communities in the Shankill and Springfield areas. Police said rioters had thrown petrol bombs, bottles, masonry and fireworks, and a Belfast Telegraph photographer was attacked. Eight officers were injured in the unrest and two men aged 28 and 18 were arrested on suspicion of riotous behaviour. Riot police gather as clashes between youths continued at the Springfield Road/Lanark Way intersection in Belfast. Photograph: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images.

Scenes of chaos have emerged from Northern Ireland as it experienced another night in a week of unrest Wednesday in Belfast, the worst since the Good Friday Agreement was signed in 1998.

smoke coming out of the oven: Two burnt out cars hijacked by loyalists are seen after they were rammed in to the Peace Wall gates that seperate the two communities on April 7, 2021 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Violence broke out after a Loyalist protest took place in front of the gates of the peace line at the Springfield Road/ Lanark Way Interface. Youths attacked police officers and petrol bombed a bus © Getty Images/Charles McQuillan Two burnt out cars hijacked by loyalists are seen after they were rammed in to the Peace Wall gates that seperate the two communities on April 7, 2021 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Violence broke out after a Loyalist protest took place in front of the gates of the peace line at the Springfield Road/ Lanark Way Interface. Youths attacked police officers and petrol bombed a bus

A bus was hijacked and set on fire Wednesday in one of many instances of violence due to tensions mounting over Brexit and fueled by clashes between British protestant loyalist communities and Irish nationalist Catholics, according to the Associated Press, as they attacked each other and law enforcement.

Northern Ireland unrest: Four key questions answered

  Northern Ireland unrest: Four key questions answered Long-simmering tensions have been brought to the boil by Brexit, worsening relations between leading political parties.On Wednesday, the fourth night of violence in a week, rioters hijacked a bus and set it on fire and hurled petrol bombs at police in the capital, Belfast. Dozens of police officers were injured.

Northern Ireland is a conflict of identities. Catholic and Protestant. Republican and Loyalist. Irish and British. The instability in the country is a product of a century-long dispute over to whom Ulster belongs. Yet the BBC only seems to consider the spree of riots as local news, but of course, if this was related to unrest in Hong Kong or Russia, it would be earmarked as the leading story of the day and given widespread coverage on its social media accounts, but with this it seems to play down the story as has most of the.

Northern Ireland 's power-sharing executive on Thursday held an emergency meeting to condemn the violent unrest in a pro-British area of Belfast. An outbreak of violence late Wednesday left at least 50 police officers injured as crowds of mostly young men set a bus on fire with petrol bombs. Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster, of the unionist or loyalist Democratic Unionist Party that supports being part of the UK, and Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill, of the nationalist Sinn Fein party advocating Irish unity, both condemned the unrest and the attacks on police.

"We are gravely concerned by the scenes we have all witnessed on our streets over the last week, including those at the Lanark Way interface last night," a statement from the Executive Office, a government department a part of the Northern Ireland Executive, said on Thursday. "Attacks on police officers, public services and communities are deplorable and they must stop."

Videos and photos on social media captured the attack on a Translink Metrobus in which petrol bombs were hurled at it by attackers before it caught fire.

Translink on Thursday said that the driver of the bus was uninjured but "badly shaken."

"A moving bus on fire surrounded by a large crowd could have led to members of the local community being seriously injured," Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) Assistant Chief Constable Jonathan Roberts said in a statement Thursday that condemned the recent violence that also involved bottles, masonry and fireworks.

Roberts said that a press photographer was assaulted Wednesday and had his equipment damaged by two masked men. An investigation is underway.

a group of people standing around a fire: Petrol is poured as youths exchange projectiles through the Peace Gate with their faces covered during clashes at the Springfield Road/Lanark Way interface on April 7, 2021 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Violence broke out after a Loyalist protest took place in front of the gates of the peace line at the Springfield Road/ Lanark Way Interface. Youths attacked police officers and petrol bombed a bus. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images © Charles McQuillan/Getty Images Petrol is poured as youths exchange projectiles through the Peace Gate with their faces covered during clashes at the Springfield Road/Lanark Way interface on April 7, 2021 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Violence broke out after a Loyalist protest took place in front of the gates of the peace line at the Springfield Road/ Lanark Way Interface. Youths attacked police officers and petrol bombed a bus. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson took to Twitter on Wednesday to express his concern over the unrest, "especially attacks on PSNI who are protecting the public and businesses, attacks on a bus driver and the assault of a journalist. The way to resolve differences is through dialogue, not violence or criminality," he wrote Thursday*.

Another night of unrest in Northern Ireland despite calls for calm in wake of Duke's death

  Another night of unrest in Northern Ireland despite calls for calm in wake of Duke's death Stones, bottles and petrol bombs have been thrown at police officers on another night of unrest in Northern Ireland. © Sky News Screen Grab Unrest in Belfast has continued on Friday It comes despite a renewed call for calm out of respect for the passing of the Duke of Edinburgh. A car was also seen burning in Belfast amid a heavy police presence.Analysis: Broken Brexit promises threaten to turn back the clock on Northern Ireland's fragile peacePolice have been dealing with unrest all week in Northern Ireland, prompting political leaders from across the spectrum to urge peace.

Police Service of Northern Ireland officers patrol the Cloughfern area of Newtownabbey. Photograph: Paul McErlane/The Observer. But there were reports that loyalists are planning fresh protests this weekend. And there was no sign of a detente between Sinn Féin and the Democratic Unionist party (DUP) to Northern Ireland had progressed greatly since the Good Friday agreement , for instance the burgeoning cross-community support for LGBT rights, yet here were Catholic teenagers sucked into a tribal battle with Protestant teenagers living over the wall, said McCaffery. “The fear is that the

Northern Ireland ’s First Minister Arlene Foster condemned the incident in a tweet, saying: “This is not protest. This is vandalism and attempted murder.” Deputy First Minister Michelle O'Neill issued a statement condemning the “disgraceful scenes of criminality” and said “protests should be called off.” The anger centres on the ‘protocol’ governing Northern Ireland , which unlike the rest of the UK is effectively still in the EU’s single market, but outside the trading bloc. The protocol was agreed by the UK and EU as part of the Withdrawal Agreement as a means of avoiding a hard border between

Many of the violent clashes occurred over a "peace wall" in West Belfast that separated loyalist protestant neighborhoods from an Irish nationalist area, according to on .

"Whilst many of those involved in the disorder last night were adults, it is clear there were many young people involved," Roberts said. "Young people were being encouraged to commit criminal acts by adults, who stood by clapping and encouraging the violence."

Irish PM warns against ‘spiral’ in Northern Ireland violence

  Irish PM warns against ‘spiral’ in Northern Ireland violence Micheal Martin issues warning after 14 police officers injured in another night of clashes in Northern Ireland.Disorder sparked in pockets of Belfast – the capital of Northern Ireland – on Friday night with petrol bombs and masonry thrown at officers, the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) said.

In sharing a video of the violence on Twitter on Wednesday, the Police Federation for Northern Ireland said, "These are scenes we hoped had been confined to history."

Dr. Jennifer Cassidy, a politics lecturer at Oxford University, tweeted Wednesday morning to recall how the "impossible was achieved" when the Good Friday Agreement was signed and said regarding the recent unrest that "hope is dying."

The Police Federation for Northern Ireland has been contacted for comment.

There have been occasional violent outbreaks in Northern Ireland since the Good Friday Agreement ended what was termed "the Troubles"—"decades of Catholic-Protestant bloodshed over the status of the region in which more than 3,000 people died," according to AP.

Could Joe Biden's tax plan hit Ireland’s economy?

  Could Joe Biden's tax plan hit Ireland’s economy? US investment in Ireland could dry up if President Biden leads a major change to global tax rules. Irish tax advantage under threatIn among those tech company HQs in Dublin's docklands, you will also find the offices of the lawyers and accountants who help US firms use Ireland's tax system to reduce their global tax bills.For the last 20 years Ireland has had a simple message: invest here and you will pay just 12.5% tax on your Irish profits.That compares favourably to headline corporation tax rates of 19% in the UK, 30% in Germany and 26.5% in Canada.It is an article of faith in Irish politics that the 12.

a man riding on the back of a fire: Nationalists and Loyalists riot against one another at the Peace Wall interface gates which divide the two communities on April 7, 2021 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Violence broke out after a Loyalist protest took place in front of the gates of the peace line at the Springfield Road/ Lanark Way Interface. Youths attacked police officers and petrol bombed a bus. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images © Charles McQuillan/Getty Images Nationalists and Loyalists riot against one another at the Peace Wall interface gates which divide the two communities on April 7, 2021 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Violence broke out after a Loyalist protest took place in front of the gates of the peace line at the Springfield Road/ Lanark Way Interface. Youths attacked police officers and petrol bombed a bus. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

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UK to respond to EU legal action over Northern Ireland by mid-May .
London readying response to challenge from Brussels over alleged breach of the UK-EU Brexit divorce deal.The EU launched legal action against the former member UK in March for unilaterally changing trading arrangements for Northern Ireland that Brussels says are in breach of the Brexit divorce deal agreed with London last year.

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