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World Virus lockdowns around the world as vaccine efforts stumble

10:15  10 april  2021
10:15  10 april  2021 Source:   afp.com

Why Hong Kongers Are Slow to Get a Vaccine

  Why Hong Kongers Are Slow to Get a Vaccine As a result of mass alienation among the population, the city views its leadership with intense suspicion.Now, however, the city is having trouble getting the public to take part in its vaccination drive, an effort hampered in large part by deep suspicion of the government and a historically unpopular leader who has struggled mightily to convince the public of the benefits of getting inoculated. An abundance of vaccines, officials are discovering, means very little when trust is in such short supply.

"This lockdown could have been totally avoided if people would take the virus seriously." The crisis is being exacerbated by a shortage of vaccines . India has so far inoculated 94 million of its 1.3 billion people, but The Times of India reported Friday that states on average had just over five days of But shortly after he spoke, the World Health Organization said there was "no adequate data" to support switching Covid-19 vaccines between doses. As for the J&J shot, the European Medicines Agency said four "serious cases" of unusual blood clots had been reported -- one of them fatal -- with the vaccine

The virus is still spreading rapidly worldwide, with over one million deaths and 38 million infections. Many nations that suppressed their first outbreaks now face a second wave. Hopes for a rapid vaccine rollout suffered a setback as US pharmaceutical firm Eli Lilly said it had suspended the Phase 3 But the World Health Organization has dismissed such plans as "ethically problematic" and requiring mass vaccinations to work. Furthermore, study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal indicated that exposure to the virus may not guarantee future immunity - and the second infection could come

Fresh lockdowns and curfews were imposed on tens of millions of people from India to Argentina on Saturday, as Covid-19 infections surged again and vaccine roll-outs were hampered by shortages and scares over side effects.

In India, the worst-hit state of Maharashtra was running out of vaccines as the health system buckled under the weight of the contagion, which has killed 2.9 million people worldwide.

a large stone building: Deserted streets in Mumbai, in India's virus-stricken Maharashtra state © Punit PARANJPE Deserted streets in Mumbai, in India's virus-stricken Maharashtra state

Having let its guard down with mass religious festivals, political rallies and spectators at cricket matches, the world's second-most populous nation has added more than a million new infections since late March.

Australian man, 44, hospitalised with blood costs after Covid vaccine

  Australian man, 44, hospitalised with blood costs after Covid vaccine The 44-year-old got the jab on March 22 and later presented to a Melbourne hospital suffering fever and abdominal pain, and was found to have blood clots in his abdomen.The 44-year-old got the jab on March 22 and later presented to Box Hill Hospital in Melbourne suffering fever and abdominal pain.

But the World Health Organization has dismissed such plans as "ethically problematic" and requiring mass vaccinations to work. Furthermore, study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal indicated that exposure to the virus may not guarantee future immunity -- and the second infection The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus . "Long COVID" - a term that refers to effects of the virus that linger for weeks or months - may be a problem for children, too

Hopes for a rapid vaccine rollout suffered a setback as US pharmaceutical firm Eli Lilly said it had suspended the Phase 3 trial of its antibody treatment over an unspecified incident, the second in less than 24 hours after Johnson & Johnson ran into a similar problem. In scenes contrasting with the fumbled testing efforts elsewhere, health workers in protective clothing swiftly set up tents and residents queued up to provide samples. As the rest of Europe struggled to contain the disease, Russia also reported its highest-ever number of daily virus deaths, at 244, and a record number of new

Every weekend from Saturday until the end of April, Maharashtra's 125 million people will be confined to their homes unless travelling or shopping for food or medicine.

"I'm not for the lockdown at all but I don't think the government has any other choice," media professional Neha Tyagi, 27, told AFP in Maharashtra's megacity Mumbai.

"This lockdown could have been totally avoided if people would take the virus seriously."

The crisis is being exacerbated by a shortage of vaccines.

India has so far inoculated 94 million of its 1.3 billion people, but The Times of India reported Friday that states on average had just over five days of stock left, citing health ministry data, with some regions already grappling with severe shortages.

Urgent AstraZeneca Covid vaccine probe lauched after man hospitalised

  Urgent AstraZeneca Covid vaccine probe lauched after man hospitalised Australia's medicines regulator has begun an urgent investigation into the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after a man was hositalised with a rare blood clotting condition. The Therapeutic Goods ­Administration held talks with British regulators overnight probing whether the 44-year-old's low blood platelets and 22 other similar cases in the UK are linked to the vaccine.Discussions will continue on Saturday between the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee and the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation.

Hopes for a rapid vaccine rollout suffered a setback as US pharmaceutical firm Eli Lilly said it had suspended the Phase 3 trial of its antibody treatment over an unspecified incident, the second in less than 24 hours after Johnson & Johnson ran into a similar problem. Chinese officials intend to test the entire city -- around 9.4 million In opposition to lockdowns and social distancing, some politicians have proposed letting the coronavirus circulate in the population to build up "herd immunity" -- where so much of the population has been infected there are insufficient new victims for the virus to jump to.

Covid vaccination campaigns are now under way in the UK and across the world . A range of vaccines is being used to reduce people's chances of getting sick, needing hospital treatment or dying. Two more vaccines have also just been shown to work in large-scale clinical trials. It is more than a year since the virus first emerged, yet the vast majority of people are still vulnerable. The restrictions on our lives are the only thing holding the virus in check as they reduce opportunities for the virus to spread. Vaccines teach our bodies to fight the infection and are "the" exit strategy from the pandemic.

a group of people standing next to a person: A medical worker inoculates a woman in Allahabad, India. The country is suffering a shortage of vaccines. © Sanjay KANOJIA A medical worker inoculates a woman in Allahabad, India. The country is suffering a shortage of vaccines.

Stay-at-home orders were also set to come into force for the eight million inhabitants of Bogota, as the Colombian capital battled a third wave of infections, adding to curfews already covering seven million across four other major cities.

Elsewhere in South America, Argentina entered a night-time curfew Friday running from midnight to 06:00 am every day until April 30.

It will be in force in the country's highest-risk areas, mainly urban centres, where bars and restaurants will close at 11:00 pm.

Both Argentina and Colombia have recorded about 2.5 million coronavirus cases, numbers surpassed only by Brazil in the region.


Video: Europe’s regulator upholds AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine amid blood clot reports (FOX News)

All of France is subject to restrictions of some form, while the German government's attempts to curb movement and commerce have been stymied by several states refusing to go along with the proposals.

Decision about AstraZeneca's use in Australia to be make this week

  Decision about AstraZeneca's use in Australia to be make this week An urgent investigation was launched into the potential side effects of the Covid-19 vaccine after a Melbourne man who received the jab was hospitalised with a rare blood clotting condition. Experts have been holding talks with European regulators to determine whether the 44-year-old's low blood platelets and 22 other similar cases in the UK are linked to the vaccine. The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) will convene on Wednesday to weigh up the risks and benefits of AstraZeneca jabs once further information is provided from international discussions.

The virus is still spreading rapidly worldwide, with over one million deaths and 37 million infections. Many nations that suppressed their first outbreaks now face a second wave. Hopes for a rapid vaccine rollout suffered a setback as U.S. pharmaceutical firm Eli Lilly said it had suspended the Phase 3 trial In Europe, the Netherlands imposed a "partial lockdown " to curb one of the region's worst coronavirus surges, with all bars, cafes and restaurants to close, and non-medical face coverings mandatory in all indoor spaces for people aged over 13. In Britain, Labour opposition leader Keir Starmer called for a

A top vaccine scientist named Geert Vanden Bossche, who has worked with numerous vaccine corporations and organizations including GAVI, is sounding the alarm over the mass vaccination of populations around the world with covid-19 vaccines . He says covid-19 vaccines are “brilliant” medicine and insists they do work on an individual level, but says they are “the wrong weapon” to be deployed on a global scale when high pressures of infectious pathogens are present. As he tweeted on March 3rd, “I am EXTREMELY concerned about the impact current Covid-19 vaccines will have

Now Berlin is changing the rules to centralise power, adjustments likely to usher in night-time curfews and some school closures in especially hard-hit areas.

But some countries were in the process of opening up.

Italy was set to end lockdowns from next week for Lombardy, the epicentre of its coronavirus pandemic, and several other regions with improving contagion statistics. 

Neighbouring Slovenia announced it would ease coronavirus restrictions and suspend a six-month-long curfew starting Monday.

- Shaky roll-outs -

As in India, Europe's stuttering vaccine roll-out faced multiple hurdles Friday as EU regulators said they were reviewing side effects of the Johnson & Johnson shot and France further limited its use of the AstraZeneca jab.

France has repeatedly changed the rules on AstraZeneca's vaccine, first over doubts about its efficacy, then over fears that it could be linked to blood clots.

a group of people in a room: People wait in the observation room after receiving a dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre in Nantes, western France © LOIC VENANCE People wait in the observation room after receiving a dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre in Nantes, western France

Here's why the AstraZeneca COVID vaccine is recommended for over 50s but not other Australians

  Here's why the AstraZeneca COVID vaccine is recommended for over 50s but not other Australians But if you're wondering what Australia's vaccine changes mean for you, or whether it's still safe to take the AstraZeneca vaccine, here's what the expert advice is saying.With the government accepting advice that the small risk of blood clots associated with the AstraZeneca vaccine means it should not be given to people under 50, its plan to vaccinate Australians against the virus is in disarray.

On Friday, it did so again, with Health Minister Olivier Veran saying under-55s who had been given a first shot with AstraZeneca would be given a different vaccine for their second dose.

But shortly after he spoke, the World Health Organization said there was "no adequate data" to support switching Covid-19 vaccines between doses.

As for the J&J shot, the European Medicines Agency said four "serious cases" of unusual blood clots had been reported -- one of them fatal -- with the vaccine, which uses similar technology to the AstraZeneca one.

The US Food and Drug Administration said it had found no causal link between the jab and clots, but noted "a few individuals" in the country had clots and low levels of platelets in the blood after receiving the vaccine, and its investigation was continuing.

Both jabs are approved for use in the European Union but the J&J vaccine has not yet been rolled out, and various EU countries have stopped or limited the use of AstraZeneca.

An AstraZeneca spokesman said half of its vaccine shipments to the EU would be delayed this week.

In the United States, deliveries of the J&J vaccine were set to drop off sharply next week, US health authorities warned Friday.

And in badly hit Brazil, the Senate said it would open an inquiry into the government's handling of the pandemic, as President Jair Bolsonaro continued to resist lockdown measures even with Covid-19 deaths at new records.

Yet Rio de Janeiro on Friday was reversing restrictions in place for two weeks, reopening restaurants and bars, though the city's famed beaches remained closed.

Got a COVID vaccine question? Ask our medical experts in the ABC coronavirus blog .
To bring you up to speed, here's a rundown of common COVID vaccines and where they fit into Australia's vaccination rollout.Associate professor Hassan Vally from La Trobe University and the ABC's national medical reporter Sophie Scott will be answering questions in the COVID blog from 11:00am AEST.

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