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World Jordan's royal family appear together after 'rift'

18:10  11 april  2021
18:10  11 april  2021 Source:   bbc.com

Jordan's Prince Hamzah, sidelined former heir to throne

  Jordan's Prince Hamzah, sidelined former heir to throne Jordan's Prince Hamzah, who says he is under house arrest in a dispute with the government, was once the crown prince but lost that title to the son of his half-brother King Abdullah II. British and US-educated Hamzah bin Hussein, 41, is the youngest son of the late King Hussein and his fourth and last wife, the American-born Queen Noor. In a video released by the BBC on Saturday, Hamzah says he has been confined to his home after several senior figures were detained in a security sweep amid reports of a coup plot.

Jordan's King Abdullah and his half-brother Prince Hamzah have appeared in public for the first time since claims of a royal rift.

Prince Hamzah last week said he had been put under house arrest as part of a crackdown on critics. He was accused of plotting to destabilise the kingdom, which he has denied.

King Abdullah expressed his "shock" at the alleged plot in a statement.

The pair were seen attending a ceremony together on Sunday.

They joined other members of the royal family commemorating the 100th anniversary of Jordan's independence. Images posted to social media show members of the royal family laying wreaths at the memorial to the unknown soldier.

Jordan’s Prince Hamzah signs letter declaring loyalty to king

  Jordan’s Prince Hamzah signs letter declaring loyalty to king Palace says Hamzah signed letter affirming commitment to King Abdullah II, in sign that rift in royal family is easing.“I place myself in the hands of his majesty the king,” the letter read, according to the Jordanian royal court on Monday.

It is the first time Prince Hamzah has been since the rift erupted a week ago.

How did the drama unfold?

On 3 April Prince Hamzah, 41, released two videos to the BBC in which he said he had been placed under house arrest.

He said a senior official had told him he was not allowed to go out or communicate with people because of criticisms of the government or king voiced at meetings where he had been present.

The apparent house arrest is thought to have followed a visit by the prince to tribal leaders, where he is said to have garnered some support to destabilise the kingdom.

Deputy Prime Minister Ayman Safadi said the prince had been liaising with "some foreign entities" and had been monitored for some time.

He accused the prince of seeking to mobilise "clan leaders against the government". Mr Safadi said officials had tried to discourage the prince rather than take legal action, but Prince Hamzah had "dealt with this request negatively".

Jordan bans reporting on plot, labels palace feud a family affair

  Jordan bans reporting on plot, labels palace feud a family affair Jordan sought to throw a veil Tuesday over its public palace feud by ordering its media to stop reporting on an alleged plot the government says involves the half-brother of King Abdullah II. Prince Hamzah had on Saturday harshly criticised Jordan's leaders from what he said was house arrest -- but in a dramatic about-turn on Monday pledged his loyalty to the royal family. Amman's prosecutor general Tuesday banned the publication of any information about the investigation into what the government has called a "wicked" plot against Jordan involving unnamed foreign entities.

He added that at least 16 people, including a former adviser to King Abdullah and another member of the royal family, had been arrested over the plot. But no members of the armed forces were said to be among those detained.

  • Jordan's king describes 'most painful' royal rift
  • Prince Hamzah of Jordan's message in full

On Monday, Prince Hamzah signed a letter confirming his loyalty to King Abdullah. In the letter, released by the palace, Prince Hamza is quoted as saying: "I place myself in the hands of his majesty the king... I will remain committed to the constitution of the dear Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan."

On Wednesday, King Abdullah released a statement which was read out on state television, describing news of the alleged plot as "painful".

He reassured Jordanians that the crisis was now over.

"Parties behind the sedition came from within our house and outside it," his address said, adding: "The sedition has been nipped in the bud."

How Saudi Arabia fits into Jordan's crisis

  How Saudi Arabia fits into Jordan's crisis Saudi officials categorically deny suggestions their country had any role in an alleged coup attempt.On Saturday Jordan's popular former Crown Prince Hamzah was placed under de facto house arrest and accused of undermining national security after attending tribal meetings where King Abdullah, his half-brother, was openly criticised. Prince Hamzah then released to the BBC two videos, calling his country's government corrupt and incompetent, and saying that people were afraid to speak out for fear of harassment by the security forces.

Who is Prince Hamzah?

The eldest son of the late King Hussein and his favourite wife Queen Noor, Prince Hamzah is a graduate of the UK's Harrow School and the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst. He also attended Harvard University in the US and has served in the Jordanian armed forces.

He was named crown prince of Jordan in 1999 and was a favourite of King Hussein, who often described him in public as the "delight of my eye". However, he was seen as too young and inexperienced to be named successor at the time of King Hussein's death in 1999.

Instead his elder half-brother, Abdullah, ascended the throne and stripped Hamzah of the title of crown prince in 2004, giving it to his own son. The move was seen as a blow to Queen Noor, who had hoped to see her eldest son become king.

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What was really behind Jordan’s royal crisis? .
The crisis was a symptom of the growing public resentment over the government’s failure to implement reforms.And yet, events of this month demonstrated that Jordan, too, is not immune to domestic instability.

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