•   
  •   

World Thailand seeking 'humanitarian' solution for detained Myanmar journalists

17:46  11 may  2021
17:46  11 may  2021 Source:   afp.com

Ethnic groups step in as Myanmar’s COVID response falls apart

  Ethnic groups step in as Myanmar’s COVID response falls apart Some ethnic organisations are carrying out testing and vaccinations in the mainly border areas under their control.The vaccines, produced by the Chinese company Sinovac Biotech, were supplied and administered with assistance from the Red Cross Society of China, a member of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.

Thailand said Tuesday it was seeking a "humanitarian" solution for three Myanmar journalists arrested after fleeing across the border, as protesters across the coup-hit nation marched for democracy on the 100th day of military rule.

a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Protesters continued across Myanmar on the 100th day since the military seized power © STR Protesters continued across Myanmar on the 100th day since the military seized power a group of people walking down a street: Myanmar has been in turmoil since the military ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi on February 1, triggering a mass uprising © STR Myanmar has been in turmoil since the military ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi on February 1, triggering a mass uprising

The trio's employer -- the Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB) -- and the Thai foreign correspondents' club urged the authorities not to deport them, warning their lives could be in danger if they returned to the coup-hit country.

Myanmar coup: 100 days of turmoil

  Myanmar coup: 100 days of turmoil Myanmar's military seized power on February 1, ousting the civilian government and arresting its leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. The 100 days that have followed have seen mass street protests, bloody crackdowns by the junta, economic turmoil and growing international concern. A recap of events: - Back to the old days - The generals stage a coup on February 1, detaining Nobel peace laureate Suu Kyi and her top allies in pre-dawn raids. It endsThe 100 days that have followed have seen mass street protests, bloody crackdowns by the junta, economic turmoil and growing international concern.

Myanmar has been in turmoil since the military ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi on February 1, triggering a mass uprising as large swathes of the population take to the streets to demand democracy.

The junta has responded with force -- shooting protesters, arresting suspected dissidents in night raids, and targeting journalists and news outlets by shutting them down.

Thai authorities on Tuesday confirmed the arrests, while foreign ministry spokesman Tanee Sangrat said they were seeking a way out of the case.

"Thai authorities concerned are coordinating to find possible humanitarian solution(s) to this case," Tanee told reporters.

DVB said their three journalists -- as well as two Myanmar activists -- were arrested during a random search in the northern city of Chiang Mai.

Myanmar army says no ASEAN envoy visit until stability restored

  Myanmar army says no ASEAN envoy visit until stability restored At least 774 people were killed and more than 3,700 detained in the military’s crackdown on opponents.Leaders of countries in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) had reached consensus on five points at a summit on the Myanmar crisis last month, which was attended by the architect of the February 1 coup, Senior General Min Aung Hlaing.

They appeared in court Tuesday and were charged with illegal entry, according to National Police deputy spokesman Kissana Phathanacharoen.

"They all denied the charge at the Chiang Mai court this morning," he said, adding that the group would be held in detention while an investigation is underway.

"Repatriation would be decided after the court's decision."

- 'The world is watching' -

DVB's chief editor Aye Chan Naing, currently in Oslo, said in a statement they are appealing to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to "intervene to help guard their safety".

"DVB strongly urges the Thai authorities to not deport them back to Burma, as their life will be in serious danger if they were to return," he said, referring to Myanmar by its old name.

The UN refugee agency said it could not comment on individual cases.

But "generally speaking, people at risk of persecution should be given sanctuary", said a spokeswoman.

Myanmar's 'Burmese Python' defends MMA fighter arrested by junta

  Myanmar's 'Burmese Python' defends MMA fighter arrested by junta Myanmar's mixed martial arts star Aung La N Sang -- known as the "Burmese Python" -- has spoken out in support of a fellow fighter injured in a bomb blast in their coup-hit homeland. But Aung La N Sang, Myanmar's most famous athlete, known for his powerful chokehold that earned him the nickname "the Burmese Python", has defended Phoe Thaw on Instagram. "As long as I've known him, he's a gentleman and good-hearted human being... please try not to spread fake news and hate," said the former ONE Championship middleweight and light heavyweight champion, who is currently based in the US.

The Foreign Correspondents' Club of Thailand warned Tuesday if the journalists were deported, they would face "certain arrest and persecution, if not worse".

"The world is watching what the Thai authorities do in this important case for press freedom in Myanmar and the region," it said.

A well-known news organisation within Myanmar, DVB started as an exile media outlet during the previous junta, broadcasting uncensored reports on TV and radio.

It moved into the country in 2012, a year after the military dictatorship loosened its grip, but had its broadcast licence revoked in March, sending its journalists into hiding.

Despite this setback, it has continued to report, posting regular Facebook updates -- as well as broadcasting on satellite TV -- about the daily protests and crackdowns.

- 100 days of military rule -

More than 80 journalists have been detained since the February 1 coup, according to local monitoring group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners -- which has tracked a total of nearly 5,000 arrests nationwide.

Security forces have also killed at least 781 civilians in brutal crackdowns, said AAPP -- though the junta has a much lower death toll and blames the violence on "rioters".

But protesters across Myanmar on Tuesday, the 100th day since the military seized power, continued to take to the streets, with crowds in Yangon chanting: "What do we want? We want democracy!"

burs-dhc/rbu

US, Canada and UK impose new sanctions on Myanmar military .
Coordinated sanctions are latest in string of punitive measures targeting Myanmar military rulers and related entities.The US said on Monday that it was targeting the governing State Administrative Council (SAC) and 13 officials, freezing any of their US assets and barring Americans from dealing with them.

usr: 1
This is interesting!