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World Marching climate activists urge G7 to step up

19:25  12 june  2021
19:25  12 june  2021 Source:   afp.com

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Thousands of environmental campaigners rallied noisily and colourfully Saturday in Cornwall to urge G7 leaders to do far more against climate change and biodiversity loss.

Boris Johnson et al. standing in front of a crowd: The harbour town in southwest England is being used to host a media centre for reporters from around the world © Oli SCARFF The harbour town in southwest England is being used to host a media centre for reporters from around the world

Beating drums and holding placards, up to 2,000 activists from the Extinction Rebellion (XR) pressure group staged a procession through Falmouth -- an hour's drive from the Carbis Bay summit site.

The harbour town in southwest England is being used to host a media centre for reporters from around the world covering the first in-person gathering of the elite group since 2019.

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Heightened security stretching around the seaside resort at Carbis Bay, including extensive police checkpoints and Royal Navy vessels offshore, has kept protesters largely out of the world leaders' view.

a person wearing a costume: Police monitor the 'Red Brigade' group from the Extinction Rebellion environmental group © Oli SCARFF Police monitor the 'Red Brigade' group from the Extinction Rebellion environmental group

"I have a grandchild who's one, and I want some life for him when he grows up not affected by climate change and pollution," retiree David Oliver, 62, told AFP as he joined the Falmouth protesters.

Oliver had travelled from northwest England, linking up with family members from other parts of the country to descend on Falmouth.

He said G7 leaders appeared unwilling to make the "radical" sacrifices need to avert catastrophic climate change.

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Dozens of demonstrators dressed entirely in red -- representing the accelerating rate of species' extinctions -- led the procession through Falmouth behind a banner reading: "G is for greenwashing."


Video: 'Drowning in promises': Extinction Rebellion stage protest in Cornwall urging for G7 action on climate change (AFP)

Others held placards bearing various slogans, including "deeds not words".

- 'Desperately needed moves' -

Falmouth resident Sas Joyce, 42, joined with her nine-year-old son -- who held aloft a sign saying "the sea dies, we die" -- and daughter, aged six.

"We just can't make our voices heard," she complained of perceived continued global inaction on the environment.

The G7 was due to discuss action on climate change and safeguarding global biodiversity on Sunday, laying the groundwork for the UN's pivotal COP26 environmental summit in Scotland in November.

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The leaders are expected to debate a pledge to protect at least 30 percent of the world's land and oceans by 2030.

On Friday they met business leaders to discuss ramping up sustainability efforts, at a reception hosted by Queen Elizabeth II and her son Prince Charles at Cornwall's Eden Project, a renowned attraction showcasing the world's ecological riches.

Despite a raft of recent climate pledges by G7 and other countries, campaigners want more detailed plans to be implemented quicker alongside greater aid for poorer nations.

Activists from UK-based anti-poverty organisation Oxfam posed Saturday as the G7 leaders, wearing papier mache heads and relaxing on deckchairs on a beach in Falmouth to make their point.

"We need to put pressure on the G7 here in Cornwall to do far more to cut their carbon but also to deliver the desperately needed moves to help poor countries in Africa and the rest of the world, who are having to fight climate change right now," said Oxfam's Max Lawson.

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Ex-Nats leader Mark Vaile tap-dances to the beat of different climate change drums .
On one side of the fence the former deputy PM is chairman of Whitehaven Coal. On the other he professes a commitment to wind and solar technology. It must be exhausting.Some high-profile philanthropists said they would no longer donate to the institution, placing a full-page ad in The Newcastle Herald today saying they “would not support a university who would choose as their leader someone who is determined to build new coalmines when most of the world is determined to reduce fossil fuel use”.

usr: 0
This is interesting!