•   
  •   

World Pressure mounts on home secretary as police pay freeze branded 'insult' by chief constable

13:22  24 july  2021
13:22  24 july  2021 Source:   news.sky.com

Apple Pay Later: Does the "Pay later pay" function?

 Apple Pay Later: Does the Who online shops, the products can also be deposited in installments. This feature already offer several providers. Now Apple PAY is obviously pulling. © Primakov / Shutterstock Apple Pay. in the pub around the corner and at the root Italy, there is the option to write the bill and pay later. Even online, this type of payment is no longer novelty. Companies like Affirm and PayPal have been able to buy them for some time and later transfer money.

Pressure is mounting on Home Secretary Priti Patel to rethink a controversial police pay freeze after a chief constable branded it "wholly unacceptable" and an "insult".

Priti Patel et al. standing in front of a building: Home Secretary Priti Patel is facing a backlash over the pay freeze for officers earning more than £24,000 © PA Home Secretary Priti Patel is facing a backlash over the pay freeze for officers earning more than £24,000

At the same time the Police Federation of England and Wales, which represents rank-and-file officers, warned on Sky News it was "not messing about" after it said it no longer had confidence in the cabinet minister.

Labour, meanwhile, has called for her to "consider her position" following what the party called a real-terms pay cut.

Sexual assault allegations at WA mine sites in Senate spotlight

  Sexual assault allegations at WA mine sites in Senate spotlight A Senate committee is looking into numerous reports of alleged sexual assault made by employees and contractors of BHP, FMG and Newcrest.Some of them are now before the courts.

Ms Patel is facing a backlash after announcing the pay freeze for officers earning more than £24,000, which she said will ensure fairness between public and private sector wage growth, with the latter having been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

a man wearing a suit and tie smiling and looking at the camera: Northamptonshire Chief Constable Nick Adderley has condemned the announcement © PA Northamptonshire Chief Constable Nick Adderley has condemned the announcement

At the same time the government said it would give NHS workers in England a 3% pay rise backdated to April 2021 to recognise their pandemic efforts during an "unprecedented year".

In a statement on his Twitter account, the chief constable of Northamptonshire Police Nick Adderley said: "Over the past 18 months I have seen officers punched, stabbed, shot, persecuted and ridiculed whilst attempting to implement confusing, rushed and ambiguous legislation, in order to protect the public and rightly, the NHS, only to be ignored when it comes to a pay settlement.

COVID-19 lockdown in Sydney expected to delay murder trial of NT police officer Zachary Rolfe

  COVID-19 lockdown in Sydney expected to delay murder trial of NT police officer Zachary Rolfe The murder trial of Northern Territory police officer Zachary Rolfe is expected to not go ahead as planned on Monday after the COVID-19 lockdown in Sydney prevented key prosecutors from travelling to Darwin. Constable Rolfe has been charged with one count of murder following the death of Indigenous teenager Kumanjayi Walker in Yuendumu in November 2019.The trial was scheduled to begin on Monday next week.But Crown Prosecutors Phillip Strickland SC and Sophie Callan SC, who are based in Sydney, are currently in lockdown due to the COVID-19 outbreak in New South Wales.

a group of people wearing costumes: Police are legally banned from striking © Reuters Police are legally banned from striking

"The announcement of a 0% pay increase for police officers is quite frankly an insult and wholly unacceptable.

"Pay aside, this indicates a complete lack of awareness, appreciation or recognition for the incredible work officers have done throughout this pandemic."

The police federation's national chairman John Apter told Sky News the statement of no confidence in Ms Patel had been a "warning shot".

He said: "It puts the home secretary on notice that we are not messing about.

"This a serious issue."

Pointing out police were legally banned from striking, he said: "We believe that's been taken advantage of and it should be the opposite.

"There should be a recognition that police officers are unique, they are in a position where they can't withdraw labour, they can't do things as other employees can.

"I would call on the home secretary now, in the wake of this warning shot to review the decision of the pay award, to revisit it.

Former DC resident speaks up about crime spike in city since COVID-19: 'Why I left as a single woman'

  Former DC resident speaks up about crime spike in city since COVID-19: 'Why I left as a single woman' Washington, D.C., residents, police and city leaders are voicing concerns with local crime incidents over the past year as the city approaches the end of COVID-19. Beverly Hallberg is one such resident. She lived in or around D.C. for about 20 years before moving to South Carolina last October, though she frequently visits the District for work.

"What we had asked for was a 3% increase across the board.

"That would cost the public purse in the region of about £138m.

"I know that is a lot of money but in the whole scheme of what we spent during COVID... it's a drop in the ocean."

Shadow policing minister Sarah Jones said Ms Patel has made a "litany of errors" during her time in office, highlighting Boris Johnson's decision to back her earlier this year despite his former ethics adviser finding that her behaviour towards Home Office staff had amounted to bullying.

The Labour frontbencher told Sky News: "We said she should look at her position when she was found to have broken the ministerial code for bullying.

"She has a litany of errors that she has made since she became home secretary but the buck stops with the prime minister on this one."

Pressed on whether she was asking for Ms Patel to stand down following the pay decision, Ms Jones replied: "We are saying she needs to consider her position."

But also speaking to Sky News, Environment Secretary George Eustice said he had full confidence in his cabinet colleague.

He said: "Under her watch we've been increasing police numbers and it's also the case that she's taken action to make sure the police have got the powers that they need to do their job and to remove some of the frustration, so I think she's doing a fine job as home secretary.

"Whatever job you're in you will get a degree of criticism, there will be things you have to do that may well be the right thing to do, but aren't always popular with everyone. That's par for the course, it goes with the territory."

Queensland police officer charged with 38 offences .
A 25-year-old Queensland police constable is facing 38 charges after a joint investigation by the Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) and the police ethical standards command. CCC chairman Alan MacSporran issued a detailed statement on the matter, describing the alleged offences as "serious".The CCC said the matter was identified by the Queensland Police Service (QPS) and referred to the CCC.Their joint investigation focused on allegations of drug use by the constable.

usr: 0
This is interesting!