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World Meat industry in emergency talks over gas shortage

18:51  17 september  2021
18:51  17 september  2021 Source:   bbc.com

Big meat, dairy firms' emissions top Germany's: report

  Big meat, dairy firms' emissions top Germany's: report The world's 20 biggest meat and dairy firms are responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than produced by the economies of Germany or Britain, a report said Tuesday. The 'Meat Atlas' is an annual digest of scientific and official data on meat production and consumption, compiled by research NGO Heinrich-Boll-Stiftung foundation and Friends of the Earth Europe. It calculates a hefty 932 million tonnes of CO2-equivalent emissions from major milk and meat companies, with Brazilian multinational JBS responsible for over a quarter of that.

UK meat processors are in talks with the government over a shortage of carbon dioxide that could hit meat production.

a close up of a person cutting a piece of cake on a table © Getty Images

The gas is used to stun pigs and chickens prior to slaughtering, and also in the packaging process.

The carbon dioxide used by the meat industry is a by-product of fertiliser production.

But fertiliser factories in the UK have been halting production due to soaring natural gas prices.

Fertiliser producers have been struggling with natural gas prices that are at record highs as economies around the world begin to recover from the Covid crisis.

In the UK, lower winds have meant less renewable energy is generated, there have been outages at some nuclear stations, and there have lower flows into the UK of natural gas from Norway, pushing up the price of natural gas.

How the sausage gets made: the serious business of fake meat

  How the sausage gets made: the serious business of fake meat On an industrial road in Coburg, in Melbourne’s north, there’s a tale of two facilities. Both are filled with razor-sharp industrial slicers, grinders, hundreds of long needles to pump marinades, and machines that fill and twist silky alginate casings, made from refined seaweed, to produce up to 400 sausages a minute. One turns out beef patties and butterflied lamb legs, mainly destined for national supermarkets. The adjacent, newer plant has almost identical equipment but no meat at all. Both are owned by Norfolk Foods, a firm that has specialised in meat processing and wholesale for more than a decade.

This week, two large UK fertiliser factories owned by US firm CF Industries Holdings suspended operations due to soaring gas prices, and on Friday Norwegian firm Yara said it would also cut production at a number of its European plants.

  • Meat sector warns of Brexit production squeeze

Nick Allen, the chief executive of the British Meat Processors Association (BMPA), was at emergency talks with the Department of the Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) on Friday to discuss the issue, a BMPA spokesperson said.

Industry groups and processors also had a meeting with the government on Thursday, as first reported by the Financial Times.

Meat processors have already been struggling with a shortage of lorry drivers and recruitment problems at abattoirs exacerbated by EU nationals leaving the UK after Brexit.

How the sausage gets made: the serious business of fake meat

  How the sausage gets made: the serious business of fake meat On an industrial road in Coburg, in Melbourne’s north, there’s a tale of two facilities. Both are filled with razor-sharp industrial slicers, grinders, hundreds of long needles to pump marinades, and machines that fill and twist silky alginate casings, made from refined seaweed, to produce up to 400 sausages a minute. One turns out beef patties and butterflied lamb legs, mainly destined for national supermarkets. The adjacent, newer plant has almost identical equipment but no meat at all. Both are owned by Norfolk Foods, a firm that has specialised in meat processing and wholesale for more than a decade.

Gas uses

Carbon dioxide is used when slaughtering pigs and chickens to stun them, and it is used during the packaging process for all meat to prolong shelf life.

It is widely used throughout the food industry, including in brewing.

However, the closure of the two CF Industries plants has cut 60% of the UK's food-grade carbon dioxide supply, the BMPA spokesperson said.

It unclear how much carbon dioxide abattoirs and other food factories have stored.

The remaining UK carbon dioxide production is being prioritised for the NHS for medical uses, and for the nuclear industry, which uses it as a coolant.

Without carbon dioxide, the slaughtering process of pigs and chickens cannot go ahead, the spokesperson said.

Millions poured into gas plan for Bowen and Galilee basins, but not everyone is happy .
But environmental activists warn the plan to open two new gas basins could impact water supplies for farmers.Federal Resources Minister Keith Pitt said the government was committing $20.7 million to the first stage of the North Bowen and Galilee Basin Strategic Plan.

usr: 0
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