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World Tunisia's Saied vows to name PM but measures remain

02:05  21 september  2021
02:05  21 september  2021 Source:   afp.com

Tunisia's president says necessary to amend constitution

  Tunisia's president says necessary to amend constitution Tunisian President Kais Saied has announced plans to amend the constitution and form a new government months after he dismissed the prime minister and suspended parliament in moves his critics called a coup. He invoked that power on July 25 to fire the prime minister, freeze parliament and assume all executive powers. The power grab came amid chronic legislative infighting that had crippled governance and was followed by a sweeping anti-corruption drive that has included detentions, travel bans and house arrests of politicians, businessmen and judicial officials.

Tunisian President Kais Saied vowed Monday to appoint a prime minister but said emergency measures that he announced in July would remain in place. “These exceptional measures will continue and a prime minister will be named but on the basis of transitional rulings responding to the will of the people,” he said in a televised speech from Sidi Bouzid, the cradle of Tunisia ’ s 2011 revolution. On July 25, Saied sacked the government, suspended parliament, removed lawmakers’ immunity and put himself in charge of the prosecution.

TUNIS , Jan 21 (Reuters) - Tunisia ' s new designated prime minister Elyes Fakhfakh said he would form a smaller cabinet than in previous governments and combat poverty and marginalisation of poorer regions. President Kais Saied named the former finance and tourism minister as his choice for premier on Monday, giving him a month to form a government that can win majority support in the deeply fragmented parliament. Speaking late on Monday, Fakhfakh said his cabinet would try to meet the aspirations of the 2011 revolution that introduced democracy, citing the October election of Saied as

Tunisian President Kais Saied vowed Monday to appoint a prime minister but said emergency measures that he announced in July would remain in place.

a group of people in a room: Tunisians listen to a speech by President Kais Said during his visit to Sidi Bouzid, stronghold of the Tunisian revolution © FETHI BELAID Tunisians listen to a speech by President Kais Said during his visit to Sidi Bouzid, stronghold of the Tunisian revolution

"These exceptional measures will continue and a prime minister will be named but on the basis of transitional rulings responding to the will of the people," he said in a televised speech from Sidi Bouzid, the cradle of Tunisia's 2011 revolution.

On July 25, Saied sacked the government, suspended parliament, removed lawmakers' immunity and put himself in charge of the prosecution.

Tunisian MP and president critic Makhlouf briefly detained

  Tunisian MP and president critic Makhlouf briefly detained Saif Eddine Makhlouf arrested by plainclothes officers as he attempt to attend court hearing against himself.Makhlouf, leader of the conservative Karama party and a frequent critic in parliament of President Kais Saied, who seized extra powers in July, was arrested by plain clothes agents as he tried to enter the military court in Tunis on Friday, his lawyer Anouar Awled told news agencies.

TUNISIAN PRESIDENCY / HANDOUT-ANADOLU AGENCY Tunisian President Kais Saied (R) meets Tunisia ' s prime minister-designate Elyes Fakhfakh. Speaking late on Monday, Fakhfakh said his cabinet would try to meet the aspirations of the 2011 uprising that introduced democracy, citing the October election of Saied as evidence Tunisians wanted big change. "We will work to establish the conditions for a fair and strong state, a state that will reward weaker regions and weaker neighborhoods and end decades of poverty and marginalization," he said.

Thousands of Tunisians took to the streets of Tunis on Saturday to protest against the country’ s president, Qais Saied , following his decision to freeze parliament, assume executive power and reject talks with the Islamist opposition party Ennahda, which is the largest party in parliament. Demonstrators gathered in front of the municipal theatre where they chanted, waived Tunisian flags and held slogans denouncing the president. Last July, amid a series of protests over the handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, Saied sacked Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi and dissolved the parliament, prompting

He has since renewed the measures for a second 30-day period, and had not responded to calls for a roadmap for lifting them.

Saied has repeatedly insisted his actions are in line with the North African country's post-revolution constitution, under which the head of state can take "exceptional measures" in case of an "imminent danger" to national security.

Speaking to a large crowd on Monday, Saied, a bitter opponent of the country's parliamentary system, said the legislature had turned into "a marketplace where votes are bought and sold".

"How can they be representatives of the people while their votes in parliament are bought and sold and sittings are paused so the price can be agreed?" he asked.

The crowd repeatedly interrupted his speech with the shouts of "the people want parliament to be dissolved."

Tunisia: Saïed announces transitional rules and a new electoral law

 Tunisia: Saïed announces transitional rules and a new electoral law Tunisia-Politics: Tunisia: Said announces transitional rules and a new election law © Reuters / Zoubeir Souissi Tunisia: Saïed announces transitional rules and a new electoral law by Mohamed Argoubi Tunis (Reuters) - Tunisian President Kaïs Saïed announced Monday during a speech before supporters in Sidi Bouzid that he had put in place transitional measures to govern and indicated that he would introduce a new electoral law, without giving more details.

Tunisia ' s parliament Friday rejected the government proposed by Prime Minister-designate Habib Jemli after months of negotiations between political parties to fill positions. If Saied 's candidate also fails to form a government, the next step would be dissolution of the assembly, risking further delays to measures needed to curb inflation and unemployment. In 2016 the International Monetary Fund approved a four-year, billion loan for Tunisia in return for major reforms, some of which are disputed.

TUNIS , Sept 18 (Reuters) - Several hundred demonstrators gathered in Tunis on Saturday to protest against Tunisian President Kais Saied ' s seizure of governing powers in July, which triggered a constitutional crisis and prompted accusations of a coup. The protesters gathered in the centre of the capital chanting "shut down the coup" and "we want a return to legitimacy", while a few dozen Saied supporters held a counter demonstration chanting "the people want to dissolve parliament".

National television station Watania, which broadcast the speech live, repeatedly cut out and eventually promised to broadcast a recorded version, prompting mockery online.

- 'Selling the country' -

Saied, a political outsider, came to power in 2019 on a wave of public outrage against political parties widely seen as corrupt and self-serving.

Without naming his opponents, on Monday Saied accused "traitors" of "selling the country".

"This is not an issue of a government but of an entire system," he said.

He repeated three times: "Sovereignty belongs to the people!"

Saied delivered his speech to a noisy crowd in front of Sidi Bouzid's municipality where Mohamed Bouazizi, a vegetable salesman angered by police harassment, set himself ablaze in December 2010.

Bouazizi's act triggered an unprecedented uprising that left some 300 people dead and toppled long-time dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, sparking a string of revolts across the region.

What do the latest decrees mean for Tunisia?

  What do the latest decrees mean for Tunisia? Tunisian President Kais Saied has taken steps allowing him effectively to rule by decree, almost two months after an initial power grab which opponents labelled a coup. The measures announced on Wednesday strengthen his powers at the expense of the prime minister's office and parliament. That comes after he sacked the government on July 25, suspending parliament, removing lawmakers' immunity and putting himself in charge of prosecutions. - WhatThe measures announced on Wednesday strengthen his powers at the expense of the prime minister's office and parliament.

Partagez11. Tweetez. Partagez. +1. 11 Partages. Tunisia ’ s President-elect Kais Saied took the oath of office on Wednesday before the National Assembly (parliament).In his speech, the newly elected president showed his support for the Palestinian cause. Tunisia will defend all causes, especially the Palestinian cause, he stated, stressing that Palestinian cause is imprescriptible, a one engraved in the conscience of Tunisians . Kais Saied made it apparent that “this position is not against Jews, but against occupation and racism”.

Tunisia ’ s president dismissed the government and froze parliament amid unrest over the “dysfunctional” political system and crumbling healthcare. His opponents decried the move as a “coup” and called for street protests. Following an emergency meeting at his palace on Sunday night, President Kais Saied announced his decision to sack Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi and suspend the parliament. In a televised address, he promised to consolidate power and “save” the country with the help of a new prime minister.

Tunisia has won praise for its democratic transition but a decade on, many Tunisians feel their quality of life has worsened in the face of grinding economic, social and political crises, exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic.

Many Tunisians took to the streets on July 25 in support of Saied's moves.

But rights groups have warned that measures including military trials of some Saied opponents reflect a worrying trend towards authoritarianism.

The measures have also received stinging criticism from his arch-foe, the Islamist-inspired Ennahdha party, which formed the largest bloc in parliament before its dissolution by the president.

Several hundred protesters, many of them Ennahdha supporters, marched through central Tunis on Saturday to demand a return to parliamentary democracy.

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For the first time a woman is to govern Tunisia .
Nejla Bouden is beginning 60, geology professor and senior employee in the Ministry of Education. Now she should lead Tunisia's government and it rest great hopes for her - in a political crisis. © Tunisian Presidency / Reuters so far hardly known in public: Nejla Bouden in Tunisia has been appointed a woman to the Prime Minister for the first time with Nejla Bouden.

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