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World India fears Taliban fallout in Kashmir

05:37  16 october  2021
05:37  16 october  2021 Source:   afp.com

From insurgency to city beat: Taliban police learn the ropes

  From insurgency to city beat: Taliban police learn the ropes After spending 13 years as a Taliban fighter waging an insurgency, Rahimullah is now slowly adjusting to the relatively ordinary role of a policeman in Afghanistan's capital. Like the rest of the Taliban, he is grappling with an awkward transition from rebel fighter to civilian patrolman, as the hardliners vow security and build a new police force. Kabul residents say street crime has dropped, with widespread fear rooted in memories of the Taliban's brutal regime in the 1990s, infamous for harsh punishments such as public stoning, lashing and amputations."This is not risky work," says Rahimullah, who joined the Taliban as a teenager "for Islam and for my country".

Indian security forces have stepped up raids in Kashmir since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan Tauseef MUSTAFA AFP/File. As Prime Minister Narendra Modi set out his Taliban worries to world leaders this week, Indian forces staged raids and battled Kashmir militants who he fears could be emboldened by the Islamists' victory in Afghanistan. Kashmir rebel shootings of civilians and police, raids by the security forces on militant hideouts, and insurgent infiltrations across the India -Pakistan ceasefire line have all increased in the Muslim-majority region since the Taliban overran Kabul on

Indian experts continue to claim that Massoud's militia is loyal to its commander and is ready to continue to oppose the Taliban terrorist movement (* banned in Russia). However, such reports are often not true. Today it became known that representatives of the same militia of the Panjshir Valley Experts believe that the reason lies in the fact that the Taliban have close contacts with Pakistan, which has a difficult relationship with India , to put it mildly. In addition, in the same India , materials appeared earlier in which it was stated that the Taliban "promised Islamabad to help resolve the Kashmir issue

As Prime Minister Narendra Modi set out his Taliban worries to world leaders this week, Indian forces staged raids and battled Kashmir militants who he fears could be emboldened by the Islamists' victory in Afghanistan.

Indian security forces have stepped up raids in Kashmir since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan © Tauseef MUSTAFA Indian security forces have stepped up raids in Kashmir since the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan

Kashmir rebel shootings of civilians and police, raids by the security forces on militant hideouts, and insurgent infiltrations across the India-Pakistan ceasefire line have all increased in the Muslim-majority region since the Taliban overran Kabul on August 15.

Taliban still struggling for international recognition

  Taliban still struggling for international recognition Group spent two years courting world leaders, but finds it difficult to gain acceptance since taking power in August.But so far, those attempts have yet to bear fruit.

Taliban - * terrorist group banned in the Russian Federation Information has been confirmed that armed clashes are taking place in Kashmir with the participation of servicemen of the Indian armed forces. Recall that Kashmir (as part of the state of Jammu and Kashmir ) administratively belongs to India , but in One such fight broke out in Kashmir a few hours ago. According to the latest information, Indian troops suffered losses during the fighting. It is reported that at least five Indian soldiers were killed, at least 12 were injured of varying degrees of severity. At the same time, some Indian servicemen say

Indian officials say the intensification of the Taliban movement could attract more mercenaries and weapons to Kashmir fighters coming from the cyst side. Pravin Sawni, a military expert and editor-in-chief of FORCE magazine, spoke on India ’s national security: “With the arrival of the Taliban , the geopolitical position of the cyst has risen and this is exacerbating its position in Kashmir ”. Kistan’s powerful spy chief, Lieutenant General Fayz Hamid, traveled to Kabul in early September amid rumors that he was there to help form a new Taliban government.

India worries weapons and fighters could enter Kashmir like they did in the 1990s © Tauseef MUSTAFA India worries weapons and fighters could enter Kashmir like they did in the 1990s

About 40 people have been killed in shootings and clashes in the two months since then in the Himalayan region, which has been divided since India and Pakistan became independent in 1947.

Militants have targeted minority Hindu and Sikh civilians, while gun battles near the ceasefire line have also left soldiers and rebels dead.

India has not openly blamed the Taliban takeover for the uptick in violence, but it has intensified patrols near Pakistani Kashmir and fortified some army camps, according to residents and security officials who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity.

A senior security official says 'there is some panic' in the Indian security establishment over the Taliban takeover © TAUSEEF MUSTAFA A senior security official says 'there is some panic' in the Indian security establishment over the Taliban takeover

Modi told a G20 summit in Rome earlier this week that international efforts were needed to make sure Afghanistan does not become a safe haven for "radicalisation and terrorism".

Kashmiri Hindus, Sikhs reel from spate of deadly attacks

  Kashmiri Hindus, Sikhs reel from spate of deadly attacks Some members of Hindu community leave the region while Sikhs terrified after a wave of attacks killed seven civilians.A Sikh principal and her Hindu colleague were shot dead inside their school on the outskirts of Srinagar, the region’s main city, on Thursday in the third attack within a week. The attackers first checked the identity cards of the teachers and then isolated 46-year-old Sikh woman Supinder Kaur and a local Hindu teacher Deepak Chand before shooting them dead on the school premises, officials said.

India ’s leaders are anxiously watching the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, fearing that it will benefit Pakistan and feed an insurgency in the disputed region of Kashmir , where militants already have a foothold. Lt Gen Deependra Singh Hooda, the former military commander for northern India between 2014 and 2016, said militant groups based across the border in Pakistan would “certainly try and push men” into Kashmir , following the Taliban victory in Afghanistan. Lt Gen Hooda added it was too early to predict if any influx of fighters into Kashmir would be “in numbers that destabilise the security

India ’s leaders are anxiously watching the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, fearing that it will benefit Pakistan and feed an insurgency in the disputed region of Kashmir , where militants already have a foothold. Lt Gen Deependra Singh Hooda, the former military commander for northern India between 2014 and 2016, said militant groups based across the border in Pakistan would “certainly try and push men” into Kashmir , following the Taliban victory in Afghanistan. Lt Gen Hooda added it was too early to predict if any influx of fighters into Kashmir would be “in numbers that destabilise the security

He has also raised India's concerns with US President Joe Biden.

In September, he told the UN General Assembly that no country must be allowed to use Afghanistan "as a tool for its own selfish interests" -- a comment widely seen as a reference to neighbouring Pakistan, the chief backer of the Taliban's 1996-2001 regime.

This time, Islamabad has stopped short of recognising the new Taliban government.

Still, New Delhi accuses its arch-rival in Islamabad of fuelling Pakistan-based militant groups Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad, which are blamed for many attacks in Kashmir.

Pakistan denies the claim.

- Weapons and fighters -

India was a backer of the Soviet-puppet government in Kabul that was overthrown by mujahideen forces in 1992.

In 2001 it helped the US-led forces that toppled the Taliban. And it was a major donor to the government that the hardline Islamists crushed in August.

Fleeing Afghan musicians stuck in limbo in Pakistan

  Fleeing Afghan musicians stuck in limbo in Pakistan Musicians who fled Afghanistan fearing the Taliban rule struggle to make a living as refugees in Pakistan.On the morning of August 15, hours before taking control of the Afghan capital Kabul, Taliban fighters streamed into Khan’s native Jalalabad, about 120km east of Kabul, taking control of the city with hardly a shot fired.

The Taliban allegedly intimidated and abused the worshippers inside the sanctum. This is the second incident of its kind since the Taliban seized power in Afghanistan. "The Sikh community has urged the Government of India to immediately raise the concerns of the Hindu and Sikh communities living in Afghanistan with their counterparts at the highest level," Chandhok said. "At the same time, the incumbent regime in Afghanistan should ensure its compliance with the UN Charter and the well-being of minorities living there," Puneet Singh Chandhok added.

India ’s leaders are anxiously watching the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, fearing that it will benefit Pakistan and feed an insurgency in the disputed region of Kashmir , where militants already have a foothold. Lt Gen Deependra Singh Hooda, the former military commander for northern India between Pravin Sawhney, a military expert and editor of FORCE, a monthly magazine focused on India ’s national security, said: “Pakistan’s geopolitical stature has risen with the coming of Taliban , and this will result in hardening of its position on Kashmir .” Pakistan’s powerful spy chief, Lt Gen Faiz Hameed

Afghan militants fought alongside Kashmir fighters in the 1980s and 1990s. About 20 Afghan "guest mujahideen" were killed and 10 were captured, according to a former Kashmiri fighter.

India worries that weapons and fighters could again reach the region, over which it has fought two wars against Pakistan.

"What we can say and learn from the past is that when the previous Taliban regime was in power, that time definitely we had foreign terrorists of Afghan origin in Jammu and Kashmir," said India's military chief of staff General M.M. Naravane.

"So there are reasons to believe that the same thing might happen once again."

- 'Oxygen to our movement' -

Protests are virtually impossible in Kashmir because of restrictions imposed by Delhi since the region's semi-autonomous status was revoked in 2019.

But some in Kashmir have quietly welcomed the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan as a victory against the odds that they too can aspire to one day.

"If they can defeat the world's largest military power, we see a possibility that we too can win our freedom," one businessman in the main Kashmir city of Srinagar told AFP, declining to be named.

The Taliban Is Just as Bad as It Always Was

  The Taliban Is Just as Bad as It Always Was As international attention subsides, the group is reverting to its old tactics.This is the opportunity that the Taliban has likely been waiting for. In the initial days and weeks that followed the group’s recapture of Kabul, it reaffirmed its commitment, set out in a 2020 peace deal with the United States, to leave its old way of doing things in the past. The Taliban pledged that under new leadership, women, who were once subject to some of the group’s most hard-line restrictions, would have their rights respected (albeit within a strict interpretation of Islamic law).

A former Kashmir militant who trained in Afghanistan in the 1990s and fought alongside Afghan mujahideen in Kashmir added: "The Taliban victory has already supplied oxygen to our movement."

Given India's security clampdown on Kashmir, Naravane and other military chiefs are confident that Delhi can cope with any surge.

But speaking on condition of anonymity, a senior security official in Kashmir said "there is some panic" inside the security establishment.

Michael Kugelman, a South Asia specialist at the Wilson Centre in Washington, said Afghanistan's new rulers could inspire "stepped up unrest" in Kashmir.

Taliban officials have said they want to maintain trade and other ties with India, meaning that some kind of contact will have to be maintained.

"The Taliban itself won't agitate for unrest in Kashmir, but those it is aligned with likely will do so," he said.

Mosharraf Zaidi, a columnist and security analyst in Pakistan, said he saw no reason the Taliban would want to "deliberately agitate the Indian authorities".

Their victory, he believes, is more important for the signal it sends to "young Kashmiri boys and girls watching the images from Afghanistan".

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Afghan National Music Institute strikes a chord in Qatar .
Group has not practiced together since their school’s doors in Kabul were closed after Taliban takeover.The group has not practised together in nearly three months, not since their school’s doors in Kabul were closed when the Taliban overtook the Afghan government. Although their musical careers back home are in limbo, they have a chance to display their talents once again, and plan to put on a show.

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