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World Canada hospitals use drones to carry lungs for transplant

05:40  22 october  2021
05:40  22 october  2021 Source:   afp.com

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The drone delivery of transplant lungs marked a global first, according to the company, but a similar flight in April 2019 delivered a kidney to a hospital in the US state of Maryland. On the Toronto General Hospital 's rooftop, the drone was met by a surgical team that whisked the package inside and successfully transplanted the lungs into a waiting patient, saving the life of the 63-year-old man who'd been diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis. The patient, by happenstance, was an engineer himself who expressed excitement to local media about receiving organs delivered by a drone .

Lungs are particularly challenging. They were one of the last organs to be successfully transplanted in humans in 1983 in Toronto and 80 per cent of those offered for donation are unusable because they don't meet oxygenation, X-ray or function standards. Drone and biotechnology companies are more There were practice flights loaded with dummy packages simulating lungs and even drop tests for the final drone and container, which were outfitted with a parachute and advanced GPS system. Rothblatt selected Toronto General Hospital because it was first to successfully complete a lung and double

In the dark of night, a drone takes off from a Toronto hospital rooftop, the hum of its rotors barely audible over the bustling sounds of the cars and pedestrians below in Canada's largest metropolis.

This handout photo released by Unither Bioelectronique and taken in September 2021 shows Unither Bioelectronique's drone transporting a pair of donor lungs, high above Toronto traffic at night © Jason van Bruggen This handout photo released by Unither Bioelectronique and taken in September 2021 shows Unither Bioelectronique's drone transporting a pair of donor lungs, high above Toronto traffic at night

On its maiden flight, with a bird's-eye view of the city's glistening skyline as it glides over apartments, shops and office towers, the drone is carrying a precious cargo -- human lungs for transplant.

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Unmanned Drone Delivers Pair Of Lungs For Transplant In Canada , Covers Distance Of 1.5km. 2 min read. University Health Network and Unither Bioelectronique joined hands to achieve this feat. UHN called it a world first. According to cbc.ca, the drone travelled the distance between Toronto Western Hospital and Toronto General Hospital . Both hospitals are part of UHN.

That drone carried a pair of lungs 1.5 kilometres across downtown Toronto in what University Health Network believes was a world-first delivery that Hodak had agreed to be part of in September. An engineer by trade and a lover of drones , 63-year-old Hodak was eager to be the first transplant patient to receive lungs delivered by an unmanned drone , completed The lungs travelled in a purpose-built drone from Toronto Western Hospital to Toronto General Hospital , both part of the UHN. The journey lasted just six minutes, but is one Hodak's doctor believes could change the future of organ delivery.

The 15.5-kilogram (34-pound) carbon fibre unmanned electric drone purpose-built by Quebec-based Unither Bioelectronics flew just 1.2 kilometers (0.75 miles) from Toronto Western Hospital on the city's west side to the roof of the downtown Toronto General Hospital.

Two days after receiving transplant lungs delivered by drone, seen in this handout photo released by Unither Bioelectronique and taken in September 2021, the Toronto General Hospital patient was well enough to virtually attend his daughter's wedding © Jason van Bruggen Two days after receiving transplant lungs delivered by drone, seen in this handout photo released by Unither Bioelectronique and taken in September 2021, the Toronto General Hospital patient was well enough to virtually attend his daughter's wedding

The trip at the end of September took less than 10 minutes. It was automated but kept under the watchful eye of engineers and doctors.

The drone delivery of transplant lungs marked a global first, according to the company, but a similar flight in April 2019 delivered a kidney to a hospital in the US state of Maryland.

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October 12, 2021 Canuck News/ Canada /Toronto. University Health Network and Unither Bioelectronique say they have completed the world’s first transplant of lungs delivered by an unmanned drone . The Toronto health-care group and Bromont, Que., bioengineering company say the drone carrying the lungs travelled from Toronto Western Hospital to Toronto General Hospital on Sept. 25. The journey lasted six minutes and was completed around 1 a.m. local time. UHN surgeon-in-chief Dr. Shaf Keshavjee says the recipient was a male engineer with an interest in drones and his

In Canada , for the first time in the world, a remote-controlled drone was used to transport lungs for transplantation . The flight of the machine with the organ took only six minutes, and its preparation – 18 months. The operation of 63-year-old Alain Hodakoda, suffering from pulmonary fibrosis, took place on the last weekend of September, but details were announced in recent days. The test flights between hospitals in Toronto, 1.5 km apart, were carried out 53. The patient is an engineer, he is interested in drones and agreed to the operation, which was preceded by an experiment with the use of a

On the Toronto General Hospital's rooftop, the drone was met by a surgical team that whisked the package inside and successfully transplanted the lungs into a waiting patient, saving the life of the 63-year-old man who'd been diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis.

This handout photo released by Unither Bioelectronique and taken in September 2021 shows a technician checking the purpose-built drone for its historic flight carrying a pair of transplant lungs from one hospital to another in Toronto © Jason van Bruggen This handout photo released by Unither Bioelectronique and taken in September 2021 shows a technician checking the purpose-built drone for its historic flight carrying a pair of transplant lungs from one hospital to another in Toronto

The patient, by happenstance, was an engineer himself who expressed excitement to local media about receiving organs delivered by a drone.

Two days later, in addition to allowing him to breathe again, he was reportedly well enough to attend via videolink his daughter's wedding.

- Flying drone in downtown Toronto -

"We've proven a very important point, that it's possible to do this safely and (that) you could fly a drone in the middle of downtown Toronto," doctor Shaf Keshavjee, who worked with a technical team for two years on the drone project, told AFP.

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The Toronto Healthcare Group and the Bromont, Que., Bioengineering company say the drone carrying the lungs traveled from the Toronto Western Hospital to the Toronto General Hospital on September 25. Unither Bioelectronics said it chose Toronto General Hospital to be a part of this historic moment, as it performed the world’s first lung transplant in 1983 and the first double lung transplant in 1986. The pulmonary birth comes as tech companies rush to drone messaging bodies after some U.S. companies perform successful flights with kidneys, corneas and pancreas.

An unmanned drone successfully delivered lung transplants 1.5 kilometres across downtown Toronto to Toronto General Hospital in what University Health Network says is a world-first. Sixty-three-year-old Alain Hodak, a "lover of drones ," is believed to be the first patient to ever receive transplanted lungs via drone , CBC News reports. A remarkable story of innovation, technology and medicine from right here in Toronto. Who knows what those delivery drones might be carrying !

The drone carried a refrigerated black container "which maintains the organ's thermal parameters" so that the organ is "viable for transplantation," explained drone engineer Mikael Cardinal of Unither Bioelectronics.

The successful flight, which required advance approvals from health and civil air navigation authorities, followed dozens of test runs as well as modifications, for example, to prevent radio frequency interference in a densely populated city.

In the event of a failure during flight, a ballistic parachute was also installed that would deploy and gently bring the drone and organs package to the ground.

Transplant organs are normally flown to airports (if between cities) and transported by car to hospitals. Using a drone between hospitals is more direct and saves time by avoiding heavy car traffic.

"Now the issue is really how do you scale this (up) to make it available to patients all over the world," said Keshavjee, a lung transplant specialist, describing lungs as among "the most fragile of all organs to preserve and transport."

This innovation, which fills him with pride, makes his partner in the project Cardinal believe that "the future is very positive" for this kind of technological advancement.

According to Cardinal, regulatory changes expected in the coming years will allow greater integration of drones into civil air space.

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