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World Gravedigger's love story wins African film prize

13:45  24 october  2021
13:45  24 october  2021 Source:   bbc.com

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A Somali film exploring what people will do for love has won the grand prize at the prestigious Pan-African film festival in Burkina Faso.

The Gravedigger's Wife is a rare Somali-language feature film © Bufo Fims The Gravedigger's Wife is a rare Somali-language feature film

The Gravedigger's Wife, written and directed by Finish-Somali director Khadar Ahmed, beat off competition at Fespaco from 16 other movies.

It focuses on Guled, whose job it is to wait outside hospital to bury the dead, and what he does to save his sick wife.

The head of the prize jury called it a courageous film, Reuters reports.

"It is a beautiful film that tells a story with humanity," Mauritanian film director Abderrahmane Sissako is quoted as saying.

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"I'm in awe. I'm speechless. Words can not express my gratitude and appreciation for this type of love from the continent," Ahmed wrote on Instagram.

A rare feature-length film in Somali, The Gravedigger's Wife is also Somalia's first entry in the Best International Feature Film category at the Oscars.

Set in Djibouti, it details the struggles faced by Guled, played by Omar Abdi, when he learns he has to raise funds to pay for his wife's treatment.

Nasra, played by Yasmin Warsame, is dying of kidney failure.

Ironically, as a gravedigger, Guled waits for the deaths of others in order to make the money which could mean his wife survives.

Ahmed wanted to "tell this story with dignity, tenderness and compassion - all the qualities I've been raised with", the director told the Guardian newspaper.

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He was born in Somalia but moved to Finland as a teenager.

His film was 10 years in the making. Ahmed wrote it a decade ago, but was determined to direct it himself and so had to learn how to be a director, the Guardian reports.

As well as winning the prestigious award, known as the Golden Stallion of Yennenga, he also received $36,000 (£26,000) in prize money.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34uFHxWOn4s

The Silver Stallion went to Haitian director Gessica Geneus for her film Freda. And the Bronze Stallion went to the Tunisian director Leyla Bouzid for Tale of Love and Desire.

The prizes were handed out at Fespaco's closing ceremony in the Burkinabe capital, Ouagadougou.

It was the 27th edition of the week-long biennial event, the continent's biggest film festival that celebrates films largely produced in Africa by Africans.

The film-school reject winning prizes and hearts .
Finnish-Somali prize-winning director Khadar Ahmed credits Africa for his great storytelling.Its pacing, timing and beauty show a confidence belying the 40-year-old's lack of experience.

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