•   
  •   

World Social media has been hijacked, Dorries says

05:15  19 november  2021
05:15  19 november  2021 Source:   bbc.com

US calls on Americans to leave Haiti amid worsening crisis

  US calls on Americans to leave Haiti amid worsening crisis Haitian police are struggling to control gangs, who for weeks have blocked fuel distribution terminals in the country.“Widespread fuel shortages may limit essential services in an emergency, including access to banks, money transfers, urgent medical care, internet and telecommunications, and public and private transportation options,” the US Department of State warned on Wednesday.

Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries has said people have become afraid to say what they think for fear of being "cancelled", and that left-wing activists have " hijacked " social media . I think social media probably contributes a lot to this. "People are afraid because of the amplification in the echo chambers of social media ." Dorries has been outspoken on social media herself in the past, such as saying in 2017 that "left-wing snowflakes are killing comedy". She stood by that comment, noting that some comedians had recently expressed concerns that they could no longer make light of certain subjects.

Health minister Nadine Dorries and two other Tory MPs have been ordered to "check the validity" of social media posts before sharing them. Party bosses spoke to the MPs after they retweeted false allegations about Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer. Sir Keir said he was satisfied with the actions taken by the party and the MPs, who have deleted the tweets. "There are more important things in the world to concentrate on than a doctored video of me," he added. A Downing Street spokesman said : "These tweets have rightly been deleted. "The MPs involved have been spoken to by the Whips' Office and

Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries has said people have become afraid to say what they think for fear of being "cancelled", and that left-wing activists have "hijacked" social media.

In her first TV interview since taking the job, she said she does not plan "to charge out on a culture war battle".

She criticised online campaigners for frightening young people "who actually do want to engage" in serious debate.

She also described negative reaction to her new role as "quite misogynistic".

After her appointment in September, comedian Dom Joly said it was "like the result of some drunk bet" while fellow comic Mark Thomas said Dorries, who is also a successful author, had "written more books" than she had read.

This is not your father's 'normal' Democrat Party

  This is not your father's 'normal' Democrat Party The Democrat Party's so-called "moderates" have had it with Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, and other members of the Squad. These "centrists" are laboring to separate themselves semantically from these neo-Marxists, although their differences end there. These "middle-of-the road" Democrats call themselves "normal." If they keep parroting that word, their feathers will turn green.

Mrs Dorries said police already have the powers to deal with anonymous trolls, but social media companies need to hand over data about individuals faster. Existing legislation, under which tech platforms can be forced to reveal the identity of trolls to their victims, has been criticised as too slow and complex to use. The Culture Secretary will meet Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen next week. A former product manager for the tech giant, she has been responsible for a series of bombshell leaks that she says shows the social media giant has prioritised ‘growth over safety’.

Ms Dorries said the government had decided to re-examine its upcoming Online Safety Bill in the light of Sir David’s death. Writing in the Daily Mail , the culture secretary said social media giants “need to hand over the data more quickly and rapidly remove the content themselves … this bill will force platforms to stop amplifying hateful content via their algorithms.” She added: “And here’s the bottom line. If social media companies fail in any of those duties, they’ll face a financial hammer blow. Ofcom will be able to fine them up to 10% of their annual global turnover.” The government has stopped

"People were making these comments for political attack and nothing else," she told BBC culture editor Katie Razzall. "I just found them thoroughly unpleasant."

As culture secretary, her in-tray includes setting the price of a TV licence for the next five years, whether to privatise Channel 4, and introducing a law protecting young people from harms online.

She has also just announced a further £107m as part of the Culture Recovery Fund to help almost 1,000 arts and heritage organisations continue their recovery from the pandemic.

Last month, The Observer described Dorries as the "minister for culture wars".

But in the interview earlier this week, Dorries said that was "what other people say about me, not what I say".

She explained: "Sometimes I think we just need to tone down the condemnation and the judgement, and evaluate and engage a little bit more than we do. I think social media probably contributes a lot to this.

Hun hangs itself … ABC attack? Must be an election ahead … red flag over brown river?

  Hun hangs itself … ABC attack? Must be an election ahead … red flag over brown river? The Herald Sun is gobsmacked that its virulent attacks on Dan Andrews' pandemic bill were followed by virulent attacks. There's plenty more too from the Crikey bunker.The Herald Sun‘s Susie O’Brien simply can’t fathom why this might have happened: “The sight of three nooses hanging off a makeshift wooden pole carried on the streets of Melbourne during weekend protests should repulse every single Victorian … Signs showing Premier Daniel Andrews mocked up to look like Hitler should also revolt us.

Ms Dorries is calling on Government to strengthen the upcoming Online Safety Bill, to ensure media companies protect users from anonymous abuse. Ms Dorries wrote: “The police already have the powers, but social media companies need to hand over the data more quickly and rapidly remove the content themselves. Finally, this Bill will force platforms to stop amplifying hateful content via their algorithms. “And here’s the bottom line. If social media companies fail in any of those duties, they’ll face a financial hammer blow. Ofcom will be able to fine them up to 10 per cent of their annual global

“Enough is enough. Social media companies have no excuses. And once this Bill passes through Parliament, they will have no choice.” © Provided by Evening Standard Tributes to Sir David Amess outside the Houses of Parliament (Dominic Lipinski/PA) (PA Wire). Mr Dorries said : “If you’re in the public eye, and particularly if you’re a woman, death threats and online abuse are the backdrop to your daily life. It’s a dark, foreboding cloud that follows you everywhere you go. “David’s death has brought into sharp relief the danger that MPs face on a near-constant basis.

"People are afraid because of the amplification in the echo chambers of social media."

Dorries has been outspoken on social media herself in the past, such as saying in 2017 that "left-wing snowflakes are killing comedy".

She stood by that comment, noting that some comedians had recently expressed concerns that they could no longer make light of certain subjects. "I just said it first," she told the BBC.

'You can't wipe away history'

Any such strident posts on social media are aimed at campaigners "on the left who have hijacked that space" rather than people who "do want to talk about these issues seriously", she claimed.

She also said she doesn't agree with removing statues and other memorials connected to the slave trade and other aspects of history, such as the Bank of England's removal of paintings and busts of past governors and directors.

"You can't, with this whole cancel culture, wipe it all out like it didn't happen and pretend it didn't exist," she said. "You can't wipe away our history, either the good or the bad."

Americans Chasing Down Trump’s Wild Election Conspiracy Snuck into a Mafia Prison in Italy

  Americans Chasing Down Trump’s Wild Election Conspiracy Snuck into a Mafia Prison in Italy ROME—One of QAnon’s wildest conspiracy theories claimed that the U.S. presidential election had been stolen from Donald Trump with the help of two small-time Italian hackers who had somehow hijacked a satellite in order to change the results being counted on American voting machines. It is now clear that this bizarro theory was not confined to the darker corners of the QAnon conspiracy network. The power of the U.S. State Department may have been pushed into action trying to prove that this was how President Biden stole the election.

THE BBC is facing a fight for its future after Tory Minister Nadine Dorries vowed to take a 'detailed look at the TV licence model'. Culture Secretary Ms Dorries called the BBC a "beacon of Britishness" but warned they were "some problems" in a thinly veiled attack on the broadcaster's £159 a year fee for viewers. MP Philip Hollobone weighed in on the row and called for the licence fee to be scrapped raging at the BBC's "disgraceful" treatment of OAPs after free TV was withdrawn for over 75s.

Tory MP Nadine Dorries has been diagnosed with COVID-19 – the disease caused by the coronavirus sweeping Asia, Europe and the Americas – less than a week after attending a reception with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Public Health England has started detailed contact tracing and the department and my parliamentary office are closely following their advice. Last week, Dorries , the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, attended a reception at 10 Downing Street hosted by Prime Minister Boris Johnson to mark International Women’s Day, and has

Dorries grew up in one of the poorest parts of Liverpool, and said her priority is to help young people from backgrounds like hers to get involved in arts, culture and sport.

"Those people in those backgrounds are of every colour and every sexuality, but are we looking after everybody when we talk about diversity?" she said.

  Social media has been hijacked, Dorries says © BBC   Social media has been hijacked, Dorries says © BBC

Her reputation precedes her - as a politician who shoots from the hip, who has previously got into fairly heated Twitter rows with detractors, and who has been dubbed in some quarters the "minister for culture wars".

Ahead of our meeting at the Young Vic theatre in London, one MP even told me to "strap yourself in for that interview".

She's a far more interesting culture secretary than many who have gone before, not least because she's sold more than two million books. She may also be right that the critical reaction to her appointment from some in the sector was sexist and snobbish.

Some of her responses about how we all need to be kinder and listen a bit more to each other will raise eyebrows among those (and she does arouse strong feelings) who will claim Nadine Dorries herself doesn't listen to opposing views. In the flesh, she was definitely in listening, even conciliatory mode.

Canada’s ‘crying shame’: The fields full of children’s bones

  Canada’s ‘crying shame’: The fields full of children’s bones Indigenous survivors of Canada’s residential schools tell the stories of those who never made it out.Listen to this story:

Her professed mission - to widen access to the cultural and sporting world - felt sincere. She's not the first to say it. But the difference is she speaks with authenticity as a result of her personal experiences.

She's levelled up personally, rewarded with a cabinet job after intense loyalty to Boris Johnson. But as the 10th culture secretary in 10 years, will she be around for long enough to make a difference?

  Social media has been hijacked, Dorries says © BBC

The £107m Culture Recovery Fund that was announced on Friday will help 925 theatres, museums, cinemas and other cultural venues and organisations "through the recovery period", Dorries said.

The recipients include Leeds Grand Theatre, English National Ballet and The Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury, Kent, which have all received at least £1m each.

"Make no mistake about this. Many theatres would not be standing today if the government hadn't supported them over the last 20 months," she said.

Some commercial theatre operators like Sir Cameron Mackintosh did not receive emergency funding, but those who applied opened their accounts to the Treasury, she said.

"You'll hear some people in the theatre sector say, 'We didn't get any of that money', but they are still standing and they are still running with plays back up, which actually is testament to the fact that they didn't need the funding, because they are still here. They have private investors."

  • The unlikely rise of Nadine Dorries
  • New culture secretary says BBC needs real change

Dorries is also working on the new Online Safety Bill, which will require social media platforms to remove harmful content quickly or potentially face multi-billion-pound fines or even jail time for executives. She told them to get ready.

"They've had notice. They've got fair warning," she said. "This bill is coming. Abide by your terms and conditions now. Remove your harmful algorithms now."

Can court cases, boardroom takeovers and protests save the planet? .
As governments lag on climate policy, people are looking to drive change in other ways. What are their tactics and do they work?Annual shareholder meetings are usually reliably dull, well-choreographed affairs, especially for a giant like Exxon. "Most people are there for the free sandwiches," laughs Daniel Gocher at the Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility.

usr: 0
This is interesting!