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World Taliban regime won't 'interfere' in other countries' affairs: PM

22:56  27 november  2021
22:56  27 november  2021 Source:   afp.com

Afghanistan ‘on the brink of catastrophe’: UN envoy

  Afghanistan ‘on the brink of catastrophe’: UN envoy UN envoy to Afghanistan urges the international community to find ways to provide financial support to Afghan people.Deborah Lyons said an estimated 60 percent of Afghanistan’s 38 million people are facing crisis levels of hunger in a food emergency that will likely worsen over the winter.

The Taliban co-founder and now prime minister of Afghanistan Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund pledged Saturday that his government will "not interfere " in other countries ' internal affairs , and urged in… Afghan Prime Minister Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund (R, pictured September 2021 in a handout photo from Qatar's Ministry of Foreign Affairs ) pleaded international organizations to continue sending aid to his country - QATARI MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS /AFP/File.

China does not intervene in other countries ’ domestic affairs , said it 1,000 times and done it for decades, which part you do not understand? If you don’ t believe what they say and do, what’s the point of asking? Security in Afghanistan has deteriorated rapidly as the United States is set to withdraw its troops by September. The Taliban have launched a series of offensives, seizing districts and border crossings across the country , while peace talks in the Qatari capital have made no substantive progress.

The Taliban co-founder and now prime minister of Afghanistan Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund pledged Saturday that his government will "not interfere" in other countries' internal affairs, and urged international charities to continue offering aid to the war-ravaged country.

Afghan Prime Minister Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund (R, pictured September 2021 in a handout photo from Qatar's Ministry of Foreign Affairs) pleaded international organizations to continue sending aid to his country © - Afghan Prime Minister Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund (R, pictured September 2021 in a handout photo from Qatar's Ministry of Foreign Affairs) pleaded international organizations to continue sending aid to his country

Hassan's audio speech broadcast on state television -- his first address to the nation since the Taliban seized power in August -- came ahead of next week's meeting between the United States and the Taliban in Doha.

Taliban bans women from TV dramas in Afghanistan

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You will interfere in Kashmir to support Pakistan? Kashmir is not part of our jurisdiction and interference is against our policy. How can we do against our policy? This is clear we will not interfere . Many Indians are stranded in Afghanistan and many Afghan Sikhs and Hindus are here. You assure that all are safe? Also,read: All countries should assist people of Afghanistan to start a new chapter of their lives: Taliban spokesperson Suhail Shaheen.

Kuwait is to suspend direct flights from nine African countries from Sunday due to the Omicron variant of the coronavirus discovered in South Africa, the government communication centre said. The countries are South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Lesotho, Eswatini, Zambia and Malawi, Reuters reports. Here is the full story on the UK’s prime minister, Boris Johnson, announcing fresh measures to curb the spread of coronavirus, including mandatory masks in shops and PCR tests for travellers entering the country after two cases of the Omicron variant were detected.

"We assure all the countries that we will not interfere in their internal affairs and we want to have good economic relations with them," said Hassan in a nearly 30-minute speech that came amid criticism on social media for remaining silent since the Islamists took power, even as the nation faced severe challenges.

Taliban co-founder and Afghan Prime Minister Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund said that girls' education has © Javed TANVEER Taliban co-founder and Afghan Prime Minister Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund said that girls' education has "resumed to a large extent," such as these students at their graduation ceremony at Mirwais Nija University in Kandahar on November 27, 2021

"We are drowned in our problems and we are trying to get the strength to bring our people out of miseries and hardships with God's help."

The Taliban seized power on August 15 after ousting the previous US-backed government, as Washington hurriedly withdrew its troops from the country after a 20-year war.

Taliban’s new media guidelines ban TV dramas with female actors, make women journalists wear hijabs

  Taliban’s new media guidelines ban TV dramas with female actors, make women journalists wear hijabs New media guidelines released by the Taliban this week ban television shows from featuring female actors and require women journalists to wear the Islamic hijab. Taliban officials told media outlets that the edicts are not hard-and-fast rules per se, but merely guidelines to be kept in mind during transmissions. The "guidelines" were laid out on Sunday by Afghanistan’s Ministry for the Prevention of Virtue and Prevention of Vice. The edicts targeting women were among nine in total aimed at reigning in what the militant Islamic group deems immoral.

The United States and other countries made plenty of mistakes in Afghanistan. Pakistan duplicitously enabled the Taliban . But the principal responsibility for this tragic end to 20 years of state-building efforts in Afghanistan lies squarely with the Afghan leadership. The Taliban ’s victory is thus a On the other hand, if the United States did not put any date on a withdrawal and instead made it conditions-based—as the Trump administration stated in 2016 it would do, even though it turned out the president himself never bought into the idea—then the Afghan politicians and government would have even less

Their brutal regime massacred opponents, allied itself with terrorist groups, oppressed women, engaged in violent displays of punishment, and committed cultural atrocities, including the destruction of ancient sites. Western powers moved to depose the Taliban regime after the September 11, 2001 US, Australian and other Western troops invaded to stop the Taliban sheltering Osama bin Laden and his Al Qaeda terrorist movement, which carried out the attacks. The Taliban were quickly toppled from power, but the group lived on, waging a brutal 20-year guerilla war against the US, its allies, and the

The Taliban's previous regime was toppled in a US-led invasion after the 9/11 attacks in the United States that were carried out by Al-Qaeda, whose now-killed founder Osama bin Laden lived in Afghanistan at that time.

Hassan is a Taliban veteran who was a close associate and political advisor to Mullah Omar, the founder of the movement and its first supreme leader.

Said to be in his 60s, Hassan served as foreign minister and deputy prime minister in the movement's previous regime between 1996-2001.

He was placed on a UN Security Council sanctions list connected to the "acts and activities" of the Taliban.

- Plea for aid -

Hassan's government faces a series of challenges, in particular reviving the country's dilapidated economy that has been dried of international aid, which used to make up 75 percent of the national budget under the previous US-backed governments.

US to resume talks with Taliban in Qatar: State Department

  US to resume talks with Taliban in Qatar: State Department It will be the second round of talks between the US and Taliban since the group took over Afghanistan in August.The US delegation will be led by the US special representative for Afghanistan, Tom West, for the planned two weeks of discussions, Price said on Tuesday.

The Taliban seized control of Afghanistan in a sweeping offensive more than three weeks ago. It now faces many tough challenges in the conflict-torn country , including stabilising the economy and gaining international recognition. On Wednesday dozens of women marched in Kabul and in the province of Badakhshan, saying they would not accept a government without women. The Taliban want "strong and healthy" relations with other countries and would respect international laws and treaties as long as they did not conflict with "Islamic law and the country 's national values", the group's statement said.

The Taliban have returned to power in Afghanistan twenty years after their ouster by U.S. troops, sparking concerns that they will impose harsh rule, neglect to provide basic services, and abuse human rights. After more than eighteen years of war in Afghanistan, the United States and the Taliban reached an agreement in what were both sides’ most intensive efforts yet to end the war. Central to the deal is a significant drawdown of U.S. troops and guarantees from the Taliban that the country will not become a safe haven for terrorists.

Inflation and unemployment have surged in Afghanistan, while the country's banking sector has collapsed since the Taliban takeover.

The financial crunch was aggravated when Washington froze about $10 billion of assets held in its reserve for Kabul, and deteriorated further after the World Bank and International Monetary Fund halted Afghanistan's access to funding.

The United Nations' aid agencies have warned that a major humanitarian crisis is unfolding in Afghanistan, with more than half of the country's 38 million population expected to face hunger this winter.

The rapidly worsening situation has forced Afghans to sell their household goods to raise money for food and other essentials.

"We ask all the international charity organisations to not withhold their aid and to help our exhausted nation... so that the problems of the people could be solved," Hassan said in his speech, insisting that the problems facing the country were the result of the previous governments.

As the Taliban struggles to emerge as a governing body, the group also faces a stiff challenge from the jihadist Islamic State group that has carried out several brutal attacks.

The US-Taliban talks are to address several issues such as fighting the threat of IS and Al-Qaeda, as well as humanitarian aid to Afghanistan.

Talks will also focus on how to offer safe passage out of Afghanistan for US citizens and Afghans who worked for Washington during the 20-year war.

Washington has insisted that any financial and diplomatic support to the Taliban is based on certain conditions, such as installing an inclusive government and respecting the rights of minorities, women and girls including to education.

"Girls' education has resumed to a large extent and there is hope that the education will be further facilitated," Hassan said, indicating that it would be guided according to Islamic principles.

bur-jd/to

Aid cut-off may kill more Afghans than war .
Urgent action is needed by the international community to prevent catastrophic hunger in Afghanistan.This dire situation is exacerbated by decisions taken far away from Afghanistan. Following the Taliban takeover, international funding to the Afghan state was immediately cut off. This was done in compliance with the US and the UN Security Council sanctions targeting the Taliban who are now the de-facto government. Nearly $10bn worth of Afghan central bank reserves were blocked by the US. In addition, donors froze development aid.

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