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World WHO wants a treaty to combat pandemics

02:45  30 november  2021
02:45  30 november  2021 Source:   rfi.fr

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Après l'annonce de l'émergence d'un nouveau variant du coronavirus, l'OMS avait jugé préoccupant ce mutant Omicron. L'organisation mondiale de la santé appelle désormais à calmer le jeu. © Reuters - Denis Balibouse after the announcement of the emergence of a new coronavirus variant, WHO had considered worrying this mutant Omicron. The World Health Organization now calls to calm the game.

Fight against CVIV-19, and already to prevent the next health crisis. Important discussions take place in Geneva. The World Health Organization has been reunited in special session to create a pandemic treaty. WHO has also insurge in restrictions on southern Africa after its revelations on the Omicron variant.

This is the second time in its history that WHO meets in special session, explains our correspondent in Geneva, Jérémy Lanche . This arrives in the middle of a wave of coronavirus contaminations in Europe, and only a few days after the revelation, by South African scientists, of the existence of the Omicron variant.

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►Lire also: "No reason to panic" against the Omicron Variant, according to Joe Biden

, while more and more states are barricadent to this new threat, the WHO calls on the contrary to leave open borders , especially with South Africa. For the World Organization, these measures are counterproductive.

If a country declares the emergence of a new variant on its soil, and that in response all others put it away, the risk in the future is that very few play the game of the transparency. In addition, these restrictions did not prevent Variant B1.1.529 from spreading, since it has already been identified on several continents in the world.

In the face of this threat, which can still be measured precisely neither the contagiousness, nor the pathogenicity, lack of decline, the WHO advocates rather for a reset of international agreements ranging towards more cooperation. This is precisely the meaning of the session.

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►Lire: Leave scientists The time to analyze the Omicron

phenomenon In the first place, there is the issue of access to vaccines: if sharing is not fair, with one side of the countries Protected and the other of the states or the virus circulates, it first poses an ethical problem, and it is to take the risk of seeing new variants. It's been months since WHO alerts on this subject. Omicron shows that the observation was good, see Simon Rozé , in charge of scientific issues at RFI.

alone, the Omicron variant is therefore a plea for the creation of a treatise on the pandemics, esteem Tedros Ghebreyesus. The boss of WHO wants it for this multiplication of unilateral border closures with southern Africa.

"We must thank South Africa and Botswana from sequencing and identifying the variant, not penalizing them, he says. And Omicron demonstrates why we need a treatise on pandemics. Because the current system does not encourage states to alert the other threats that will inevitably arrive at home.

A treaty will not prevent national selfishness. But for his followers, he would have the merit of better coordinating the response and the sharing of information in case of emergence of a new infectious agent, with the automatic sending of experts on the ground.

is still far away. Because the consensus that seems to emerge in Geneva in recent hours does not say anything about the content of the future treaty. Negotiations could last months or even years. With a possible entry into force that will not be programmed before 2024.

► At the one: WIND OF GLOBAL PANIC FACING THE EMERGENCE OF THE NEW OMICRON VARIANT

Omicron Is Moving Fast. Congress Is Moving Slow with Pandemic Prep. .
When the new Omicron strain of COVID-19 emerged last week, it hinted at the exact worst-case scenario that lawmakers and public-health advocates have been hoping to mitigate through action in Washington. For months, they have pushed Congress to approve a huge pot of funding—at least $30 billion—to help strengthen science and public-health infrastructure, in hopes of giving the United States a head start when another pandemic emerges. But thisFor months, they have pushed Congress to approve a huge pot of funding—at least $30 billion—to help strengthen science and public-health infrastructure, in hopes of giving the United States a head start when another pandemic emerges.

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This is interesting!