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World In China, an artificial intelligence becomes prosecutor

01:00  30 december  2021
01:00  30 december  2021 Source:   parismatch.com

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an attack capable of identifying crimes and proposing the corresponding sentence was tested in Shanghai.

  En Chine, une intelligence artificielle devient procureur © Wang Gang / Costfoto / SIPA

Chinese researchers have developed the first prosecutor using artificial intelligence. Tested in a district of Shanghai , this IA is able to identify 8 types of common offenses including fraud, dangerous driving, aggression and obstruction of the action of the police reports "South China Morning Post . The AI ​​is based on an existing program, the system 206, already used by Chinese prosecutors to assess the dangerousness and risk of criminals.

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rules but this new version goes much further: it is able to identify and not take into account the irrelevant data of A case and especially to propose a sentence, ranging from the fine to the prison, for the criminal "with an accuracy of 97%" ensure the researchers in an article published by "Management Review". But this perspective is not without worrying some magistrates and lawyers: "Despite this announced clarification, the risk of error is always possible. What will happen if the AI ​​sends someone to prison wrongly? Who will endorse this responsibility? The magistrate, machine or designer of the algorithm? " Ask a prosecutor under cover of anonymity in the South China Morning Post.

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usr: 0
This is interesting!