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World US bill aims to end China's 'chokehold' on America's rare earth supplies

09:18  15 january  2022
09:18  15 january  2022 Source:   afp.com

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" Ending American dependence on China for rare earths extraction and processing is critical to building up the U . S . defense and technology sectors," Cotton told Reuters. The senator, who sits on the Senate' s Armed Forces and Intelligence committees, described China ' s evolution into the global rare earths Known as the Restoring Essential Energy and Security Holdings Onshore for Rare Earths Act of 2022, the bill would codify and make permanent the Pentagon' s ongoing stockpiling of the materials. China temporarily blocked rare earth exports to Japan in 2010 and has issued vague threats it could

“The Chinese Communist Party has a chokehold on global rare - earth element supplies , which are used in everything from batteries to fighter jets,” Cotton said in a statement. “ Ending America ’ s dependence on the CCP for extraction and processing of these elements is critical to winning the strategic competition against China and protecting our national security.” The REEShore Act would order the Department of Defense and Department of the Interior to create a national stockpile of rare - earth metals by 2025, according to the announcement.

Two US senators have proposed a law aiming to end China's alleged "chokehold" on rare-earth metal supplies, a statement by the lawmakers said Friday.

Senator Tom Cotton said the proposed law would protect the United States' national security © Tom Brenner Senator Tom Cotton said the proposed law would protect the United States' national security

The law -- proposed by Democrat Mark Kelly and Republican Tom Cotton -- would aim to ensure the United States can guarantee its supplies of rare-earth minerals.

"The Chinese Communist Party has a chokehold on global rare-earth element supplies, which are used in everything from batteries to fighter jets," Cotton said in the statement.

"Ending America's dependence on the CCP for extraction and processing of these elements is critical to winning the strategic competition against China and protecting our national security," he said.

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China temporarily suspended exports of rare earths to Japan in 2010 and issued vague threats that it could do the same to the United States . To build this reserve, though, the Pentagon buys some supplies from China , a contradiction that Senate staff hope will diminish over time. The bill , which sponsors expect to be added to Pentagon funding legislation later this year, offers no direct support for the U . S . rare earth sector. Instead, it requires Pentagon contractors to stop using Chinese rare earths within four years, except in exceptional circumstances. Defense contractors will urgently need to

" Ending American dependence on China for rare earths extraction and processing is critical to building up the U . S . defense and technology sectors," Cotton told Reuters. The senator, who sits on the Senate' s Armed Forces and Intelligence committees, described China ' s evolution into the global rare earths Known as the Restoring Essential Energy and Security Holdings Onshore for Rare Earths Act of 2022, the bill would codify and make permanent the Pentagon' s ongoing stockpiling of the materials. China temporarily blocked rare earth exports to Japan in 2010 and has issued vague threats it could

Eighty percent of the United States' rare-earth imports in 2019 were from China, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

The bill aims to "protect America from the threat of rare-earth element supply disruptions, encourage domestic production of those elements, and reduce our reliance on China", the statement said.

The law would require the departments of the Interior and Defense to create a "strategic reserve" of rare earth minerals by 2025.

That reserve would be tasked with responding to the needs of the army, the tech sector and other essential infrastructure "for one year in the event of a supply disruption".

It also aims to ensure greater transparency on the origins of the components, restricts the use of rare-earth minerals from China in "sophisticated" defense equipment, and urges the Commerce Department to investigate Beijing's "unfair trade practices" and impose higher customs duties accordingly.

"Our bipartisan bill will strengthen America's position as a global leader in technology by reducing our country's reliance on adversaries like China for rare earth elements," Kelly said in the statement.

With 44 million tons of reserves, China possesses some of the largest deposits of rare-earth metals, according to the USGS, and benefits from looser environmental regulations than many of its competitors.

Beijing has used these deposits to exert political pressure. In 2010, China halted rare-earth exports to Japan in retaliation over a territorial dispute.

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This is interesting!