•   
  •   

World Protesters hurt as Iraqi parliament stormed again

16:02  30 july  2022
16:02  30 july  2022 Source:   bbc.com

Iraq: day of national mourning after the deadly strikes attributed to Turkey

 Iraq: day of national mourning after the deadly strikes attributed to Turkey © Safin Hamed, AFP Kurdistan Nechirvan Barzani pays tribute to the victims on the tarmac of Erbil airport, July 21, 2021. A day of national mourning was decreed Thursday in Iraq when public opinion does not take off in the aftermath of artillery fire attributed to Turkey and having killed nine civilians in the north of the country. Turkey, which has had dozens of military bases for 25 years in Iraqi Kurdistan, regularly launches military operations against the Kurdistan workers' party (PKK).

At least 60 people have been injured as protesters stormed the Iraqi parliament for the second time in a week.

Supporters of the Iraqi cleric Muqtada al-Sadr raised portraits of their leader inside the country's parliament © AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/getty Supporters of the Iraqi cleric Muqtada al-Sadr raised portraits of their leader inside the country's parliament

The supporters of cleric Muqtada al-Sadr again breached the high-security green zone in Baghdad, as they oppose the nomination of a pro-Iran rival candidate for prime minister.

Mr Sadr's block won the most seats last October, but it is not in power due to a political deadlock.

Six of the injured were in serious conditions, a ministry statement said.

Demonstrators initially massed at the end of a bridge leading to the closely-guarded green zone - which is home to a number of the capital city's most important buildings, including embassies.

Iraqi Kurd farmers battle drought as Lake Dukan retreats

  Iraqi Kurd farmers battle drought as Lake Dukan retreats Farmers in Iraqi Kurdistan seeking to irrigate crops face seeing their economic lifeline slip away as the waters of Lake Dukan recede and dams upstream in Iran stem the flow. Bapir Kalkani, who is also a trade unionist, farms near the picturesque lake but has seen marked changes over the past three years as Iraq suffers prolonged drought. "There was water where I'm standing now" in 2019, the 56-year-old said. "It used to go three kilometres (two miles) further, but the level has retreated."Sesame and beans are being grown on the plain under a blazing sun, adjacent to the lake which is fed by a Tigris tributary, the Lower Zab river which has its source in Iran.

But dozens of them tore down concrete barriers protecting the area and ran inside parliament where they waved Iraqi flags and pictures of Mr Sadr.

Iraq's current prime minister, Mustafa al-Kadhimi, instructed the security forces to "protect the demonstrators".

He called on protesters to "maintain their peaceful move, avoid escalation and abide by the directives of the security forces whose goal is to protect them, and to protect official institutions".

Saturday's protest follows one staged on Wednesday, when hundreds of people broke into parliament.

The unrest come after nine months of stalemate, during which disputes between the country's different political factions have prevented the creation of a new government.

Mr Sadr, a Shia cleric who wants to end US and Iranian influence over Iraq's internal affairs, claimed victory for his nationalist Saeroun movement following October's election.

But it has proved impossible since then to build a new governing coalition, as Mr Sadr has refused to work with rivals.

He and his supporters have opposed the candidacy of Mohammed al-Sudani for prime minister, as they believe him to be too close to Iran.

Al Sadr calls for dissolving Parliament and calling early elections in Iraq .
Shiite cleric Muqtada al Sadr, who leads the nationalist Sayirun coalition, whose supporters have occupied the Iraqi lower house, called Wednesday for dissolving parliament and calling early elections in the country. © Provided by News 360 Protests in the Iraqi Parliament - Ameer Al-Mohammedawi/dpa "The old faces will not exist through an early democratic electoral process after the dissolution of Parliament," he has said, adding that "the Iraqi people are tired of the entire ruling class," so "the protesters must stay and continue their sit-in until they achieve their demands.

usr: 0
This is interesting!