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World One amazing photo with Trump and NATO leaders says it all

04:06  12 july  2018
04:06  12 july  2018 Source:   businessinsider.com.au

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NATO leaders , including US President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, looking awkward and uncomfortable with each other captures the many tensions overshadowing the summit.

Today News - One amazing photo with Trump and NATO leaders says it all This family photo from the NATO summit on Thursday captured the tensions between US

Mark Rutte, Donald Trump standing next to a person wearing a suit and tie: This family photo from the NATO summit on Thursday captured the tensions between US President Donald Trump and American allies.© Provided by This family photo from the NATO summit on Thursday captured the tensions between US President Donald Trump and American allies. World leaders are currently gathered in Brussels, Belgium for the 2018 NATO summit, and after last month's rocky G7 summit, there are no shortage of tensions to be resolved.

This "family photo" of NATO members looking uncomfortable and askance in different directions seem to perfectly capture the significant differences in opinion and conflicts overshadowing the summit.

While the United States and Europe have historically been close military and economic allies, President Donald Trump has upended that order by repeatedly taking Europe to task over defence spending and trade while pursuing a closer US relationship with adversary Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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World leaders are currently gathered in Brussels, Belgium for the 2018 NATO summit, and after last month’s rocky G7 summit, there are no NOW WATCH: Why the North Korea summit mattered even if it was ‘mostly a photo op’. Source: BusinessInsider One amazing photo with Trump and NATO

World leaders are currently gathered in Brussels, Belgium for the 2018 NATO summit, and after last month’s rocky G7 summit, there are no Sean Gallup/Getty ImagessThis family photo from the NATO summit on Thursday captured the tensions between US President Donald Trump and American allies.

In the photo were: German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, Trump, and British Prime Minister Theresa May.

While on his way to the summit, Trump fired off a series of confrontational tweets accusing his NATO allies of stiffing the US by not paying their fair share to contribute to NATO's budget, and lamenting the trade imbalance between the US and the European Union.

"NATO benefits Europe far more than it does the US," Trump wrote. "By some accounts, the US is paying for 90% of NATO, with many countries nowhere close to their 2% commitment. On top of this the European Union has a Trade Surplus of $US151 Million with the US, with big Trade Barriers on US goods. NO!"

Trump says he can't say if Putin is friend or foe

  Trump says he can't say if Putin is friend or foe U.S. President Donald Trump said on Tuesday he could not say if Vladimir Putin is a friend or foe, and that a meeting with the Russian president could be the easiest part of a tour of Europe that includes a NATO meeting and a visit to Britain. Speaking to reporters at the White House before leaving on the week-long trip, Trump repeated his criticism of NATO allies for not spending enough on their defence and pointed to the political tensions in Britain over the government's Brexit plans. © REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque U.S.

© Offered by This household photograph from the NATO summit on Thursday captured the tensions between US President Donald Trump and American allies. World leaders are presently gathered in Brussels, Belgium for the 2018 NATO summit, and after final month’s rocky G7 summit

In the photo were: German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, Trump , and British Prime Minister Theresa May.

Currently, NATO members are encouraged to put a target of 2% of their economic output to the Organisation's budget, but the 2% figure is only a guideline. There isn't a penalty for not meeting it, but Trump has repeatedly castigated Germany in particular for not spending enough, in his view, on defence.

Before the summit, European Union President Donald Tusk hit back at Trump for his "daily" criticisms of Europe, pointing out that the EU spends more on defence than Russia and almost as much as China, and telling him to "appreciate your allies. After all, you don't have that many."

Tusk and other NATO members are also concerned about the security implications of Trump's friendly relationship with Putin, who he publicly praises more than his European partners. Trump and Putin are set to meet on July 16 in Finland.

Trump's attacks on NATO raise questions about its future .
President Donald Trump's repeated tongue lashings of NATO allies and his friendly overtures to Russian President Vladimir Putin are stirring questions at home and abroad about Trump's commitment to an Atlantic alliance that has been a pillar of U.S. security policy for more than half a century.&nbsp;WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump's repeated tongue lashings of NATO allies and his friendly overtures to Russian President Vladimir Putin are stirring questions at home and abroad about Trump's commitment to an Atlantic alliance that has been a pillar of U.S. security policy for more than half a century.

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