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Enthusiasts How They Made Matchbox Cars in 1965

18:28  09 august  2018
18:28  09 august  2018 Source:   roadandtrack.com

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Check out the process of how Matchbox toy cars were made in 1965 at the Matchbox cars factory in Hackney, London. For Archive Licensing Enquiries Visit

Matchbox cars are an integral part of nearly every modern gearhead's formative years. The miniature motor company was founded in 1953, inspired by It was still a human-intensive process, as we get to see in this British Pathé film from the Hackney, London plant where the miniatures were made in 1965 .

At a factory in Hackney, London, we get to see a new-for-'65 Matchbox design go from drawing board to production line.: How They Made Matchbox Cars in 1965© Provided by Hearst Communications, Inc How They Made Matchbox Cars in 1965

Matchbox cars are an integral part of nearly every modern gearhead's formative years. The miniature motor company was founded in 1953, inspired by co-owner Jack Odell-who hand-fashioned a tiny steam roller for his daughter, to comply with her school's rule that students could only bring toys that would fit inside a match box.

The rest, as they say, was history. By 1965, Matchbox was cranking out dozens of highly-detailed miniatures. It was still a human-intensive process, as we get to see in this British Pathé film from the Hackney, London plant where the miniatures were made in 1965.

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© Provided by Hearst Communications, Inc How They Made Matchbox Cars in 1965 . Matchbox cars are an integral part of nearly every modern gearhead's formative years. The miniature motor company was founded in 1953, inspired by co-owner Jack Odell-who hand-fashioned a tiny steam roller for his

How They Are Made Matchbox Toy Cars In 1965 CocktailVP.com.

This short film takes us through the full process of creating a new Matchbox model-from design, to prototyping, to mass-production. It's similar to the process that real-life automakers use, just shrunken down to 1:87 scale.

We're betting this will inspire you to go to your attic, basement or garage and dig up those Matchbox (and, sure, those Hot Wheels too). They're so much more than just a toy.

If you can't view the YouTube video above, click here.

via BoingBoing

Eye Candy: 1965 Porsche 356 C .
Roy Wright: Wheels Reader Occupation: Retired graphic artist and art instructor The Car: 1965 Porsche 356 C The 356 was Porsche’s first sports car design. It was introduced in 1948 and had a 17-year run, ending in 1965. The final year of the 356’s evolution had the car sporting all-around disc brakes and a 1,600 cc boxer engine. The story of my Porsche 356 began when I was a teenager and art student. It was not uncommon in 1958 to see a 356 driving around the streets of Toronto. I was smitten by the uniquely gorgeous shapes of both the cabriolet and coupes.

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