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Research Why Your Next Car Might Use 48-Volt Technology

04:17  03 may  2018
04:17  03 may  2018 Source:   consumerreports.org

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Why 48 - Volt ? Most cars today contain the typical 12-volt electrical system that relies on an alternator to convert the engine’s power into electrical current. That’s also the case with the energy-hungry sensors and computers necessary for the next generation of autonomous vehicle technology .

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Automakers worldwide increasingly talk about electrifying their fleets, but it doesn’t mean every future car or truck will need to be plugged in. Instead, the first wave of this advance is 48-volt technology.

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The new onboard battery systems can provide extra juice to run infotainment and advanced safety systems that are increasingly complex and thirsty for power. Other benefits include decreased emissions and even improved acceleration.

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This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use . Many cars will soon have 48 - volt electrical systems. Odds are your next car will have a start-stop system, probably 12 volts, and a slightly larger 12-volt battery.

Mild hybrid systems that use 48 - volt components can increase fuel economy by up to 15 percent “So even in 2030, 48 volts will be part of the mix.”CreditKarl Nielsen for Delphi Technologies . But skeptics may wonder why engineers are devoting so much effort to developing the mild hybrid

Although consumers may wonder how the technology works, why it’s suddenly popular, and whether it’s going to be reliable in the long run, experts tell CR that car buyers needn’t worry. That’s because 48-volt systems are an easy way for an automaker to improve performance, fuel economy, and even reliability.

Why 48-Volt?

Most cars today contain the typical 12-volt electrical system that relies on an alternator to convert the engine’s power into electrical current. That current charges the vehicle’s starter battery and runs all the vehicle’s electrical components, including lighting, infotainment, and safety systems.

But 12-volt systems are becoming inadequate for modern vehicles, said Sam Abuelsamid, a senior analyst at Navigant.

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Subject: Cars with 48 volt technology promise better fuel economy, more power, and improved reliability. Some of our advertising partners, may use cookies, web beacons and/or other similar types of monitoring technologies , as Java Script, on our site.

Why Your Next Car Might Use 48 - Volt … Cars with 48 - volt technology promise better fuel economy, more power, and improved reliability.

“We’ve got so many things in the vehicle today that are demanding electrical power,” he says, from advanced safety technology to convenience features.

That’s why automakers including Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA), Mercedes-Benz, and Volkswagen have started designing vehicles using 48-volt systems, which CR calls mild hybrids. The technical changes are relatively minor. Cars get an electric generator instead of an alternator, and a larger battery and regenerative brakes.

Why are they making the change? Because a 48-volt system can save fuel, reduce emissions, and increase power, which helps automakers meet stricter worldwide fuel economy and emissions standards without sacrificing performance. Beyond the power boost and fuel savings, 48-volt systems don’t add as much up-front cost as true hybrids, such as the Toyota Camry Hybrid.

"The addition of 48-volt batteries can be good value for consumers because they support the latest tech features and boost fuel efficiency at a reasonable price point,” said Shannon Baker-Branstetter, senior policy counsel for energy and environment at Consumers Union, the advocacy division of Consumer Reports.

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But we're not talking about the main traction battery here: we're talking about the 12- volt accessory battery that's used to provide power to lights, radio and on-board computer -- as well as start the car . Just like the 12- volt starter battery in an internal combustion engined car , having an issue with your

Upping the volts will make hybrid cars much cheaper. Print edition | Science and technology . That is why electrical power lines work at high voltage. The first production car to use 48 volts is the SQ7, a new luxury sports-utility vehicle made by Audi, a German firm that is part of the Volkswagen Group.

For example, a 48-volt system comes standard on the 2019 Ram 1500 outfitted with the smaller 3.6-liter engine. It adds only $800 to a Ram equipped with the larger 5.7-liter V8 engine, and it can boost fuel economy up to 10 percent, FCA says. It also adds up to 130 lb.-ft. of torque, which translates into better initial acceleration and more power for hauling and towing.

the engine of a car© Provided by Consumer Reports

The 48-volt battery system allows the 2019 Audi A6 to shut off its engine while coasting to save fuel. The setup also makes the car’s auto stop/start function—which shuts off the engine when the car is stopped—much less intrusive. The engine restarts faster and the air conditioning stays on while the engine is off, which addresses a common consumer complaint.

“Ultimately, the biggest change in performance I think the U.S. consumer is going to appreciate is the feel of the engine start-stop performance,” says Brian McKay, director of powertrain technology and innovation for Continental North America, which supplies Audi with its 48-volt system. According to McKay, Continental’s system adds only about 33 pounds to the weight of the vehicle.

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The interface of iDrive 7.0 is now completely digital and features newly designed dials, while information such as the navigation can be displayed between them for the first time. Depending on the driving mode you’re in, the display also changes color accordingly. Why Your Next Car Might Use 48 - Volt

Consumers will also see a vehicle’s electric-powered convenience features perform better, McKay says, with the vehicle “being able to warm up your seats faster, defrost your windshield faster.” A 48-volt system will also provide enough amperage to run power tools, which is a feature McKay expects to see used on pickup trucks. Already, FCA says the Ram 1500 can provide up to 400 watts of power.

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A 48-Volt Future

Drivers should expect even more 48-volt advances soon. “Once you have a 48-volt infrastructure available in your car, you can start doing some interesting things with it,” McKay says.

Audi already uses the 48-volt system in its A8 sedan to power small electric motors in its adaptive suspension. In Europe, the 48-volt 2018 Audi SQ7 TDI uses an electric compressor to help its twin turbochargers work faster and better, improving acceleration.

A 12-volt electrical system just wouldn’t have enough juice to power these systems, Abuelsamid says. That’s also the case with the energy-hungry sensors and computers necessary for the next generation of autonomous vehicle technology.

In the near future, he expects more belt-driven engine components—like water pumps and radiators—to get electrified as 48-volt systems become more commonplace.

“They should also be more reliable in the long term, because they’re not dependent on that belt,” he says. Because electrical systems often have fewer moving parts than traditional approaches, they have been found to be more reliable over time.

According to McKay, the 48-volt system itself shouldn’t cause any maintenance headaches. The whole system, including the battery, “will last the lifetime of the vehicle,” he says.

We at CR are eager to put those claims to the test. Our recently purchased Ram 1500 will be the first 48-volt vehicle we evaluate, and we expect to publish our test results soon. As for reliability, we will see what CR members say in future surveys.

Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world. CR does not endorse products or services, and does not accept advertising. Copyright © 2018, Consumer Reports, Inc.

2018 PHEV and EV Range and Charging Times .
Ready, set, plug in – and go. Electrified vehicles are still just a sliver of the market, but automakers facing ever-tightening fuel economy and emissions standards are adding battery power to help meet them .Along with hybrid vehicles – which use combined gas/electricity and recharge their own batteries but don’t plug into the wall – there are several electric-only (EV) and plug-in hybrid (PHEV) vehicles on the market.Is one of them right for you? That depends on several factors, but among the most important is how far it’ll go after you’ve plugged it in.

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