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Food & Drink Why You Shouldn’t Keep Bread on the Counter (and Where to Store it Instead)

11:50  17 may  2018
11:50  17 may  2018 Source:   eatthis.com

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Why You Shouldn ’ t Keep Bread on the Counter ( and Where to Store it Instead ). Where you store your bread says a lot about how long it will lasts. Whether you store bread in a basket or on a fruit stand, studies show that keeping it on the counter is the last place you should be leaving your loaf.

Whether you store bread in a basket or on a fruit stand, studies show that keeping it on the counter is the last place you should be leaving your loaf.

Whether you store bread in a basket or on a fruit stand, studies show that keeping it on the counter is the last place you should be leaving your loaf. According to a report from Food Studies at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, the microorganisms that cause food to spoil grow best at room temperature. Bread will get moldy and fuzzy after about a week if you store it on your counter. And if you leave it exposed to light and air, it can speed up its deterioration. Mold spores in the air end up on your bread, but they have long roots, so it could take a few days before a blueish fuzz starts to sprout. That means you could be innocently almond buttering infected toast without realizing it.

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Why You Shouldn ’ t Keep Bread on the Counter ( and Where to Store it Instead ). Where you store your bread says a lot about how long it will Whether you store bread in a basket or on a fruit stand, studies show that keeping it on the counter is the last place you should be leaving your loaf.

Why You Shouldn ’ t Keep Bread on the Counter ( and Where to Store it Instead ). Keep tomatoes out in a bowl or basket on the counter . Instead of putting potatoes in the fridge, store them in a paper bag in a cool -- not cold -- place.

Loaf of bread on kitchen counter in plastic bag © Shutterstock Loaf of bread on kitchen counter in plastic bag

Where You Should Store Bread Instead…

So you’re probably wondering how to store your bread, right? You can save room-temperature storage for canned foods and other non-perishable items. The best place for your bread is in your freezer! It doesn’t matter if you buy it fresh from the bakery or packaged from the grocery—don’t leave it out longer than a day. A study from the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that keeping bread in the freezer reduces the chances of mold developing, which in turn decreases food waste. Your loaf can last up to three months in the freezer and still be ready to eat in minutes. For example, Ezekiel Bread is sold in the frozen food aisle because sprouted grain bread has fewer preservatives than their enriched white cousins, so the grocers keep it cold to avoid early onset spoilage.

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Why You Shouldn ’ t Keep Bread on the Counter ( and Where to Store it Instead ). Where you store your bread says a lot about how long it will lasts. Bread will get moldy and fuzzy after about a week if you store it on your counter . And if you leave it exposed to light and air, it can speed up its

Why You Shouldn ’ t Keep Bread on the Counter ( and Where to Store it Instead ). Where you store your bread says a lot about how long it will lasts. Bread will get moldy and fuzzy after about a week if you store it on your counter . And if you leave it exposed to light and air, it can speed up its

Is Mold Dangerous?

It’s frustrating to discover that the bread you were about to eat has more fuzz and spots than a Dalmatian. If you thought about removing the moldy parts and eating the rest, you’re not alone. The good news is that eating moldy bread won’t kill you, but consuming too much of it can cause tummy troubles, allergic reactions, and respiratory issues. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends tossing moldy food immediately, but if you wanted to eat it anyway, just make sure you remove the moldy spots and the areas around them to get the spore’s roots out, too. But if it’s on our list of the unhealthiest bread on the planet, it’s probably not worth saving anyway.

This Wholesome Zucchini Bread Will Inspire You to Seize the Dang Day .
Photo by Ty Mecham I ate a lot of vegetable-stuffed, bran-speckled, nut-studded morning glory muffins as a child, which helps explain how 20-something years later we ended up here, with me picking on poor zucchini bread like it was out to hurt someone. It’s not that I don’t like zucchini bread. I just have a few, you know, thoughts on it. Like its banana and pumpkin counterparts, zucchini bread is less like bread and more like cake—oily, sweet, and white flour–based, all of which put it pretty low on my breakfast list. In her book Healthyish, Lindsay Maitland Hunt shares a similar gripe: “I absolutely LOVE banana bread, but so often it’s as sweet as a cake and too oily,” she writes. “That’s good for special occasions, but for weekday mornings, I want a slice that feels mostly wholesome.” Gingery Olive Oil Zucchini Cake with Poppy Seeds and Lemo by Sarah Jampel Seeded Whole-Wheat Banana Bread by Lindsay Maitland Hunt This zucchini bread follows in those footsteps. It keeps all the reasons why I absolutely LOVE zucchini bread, and adds lots of hearty, nourishing ingredients to make it morning glorious. Here’s how we’ll do it: Less watery zucchini means more zucchini. Zucchini is almost entirely water. This means it’s an ultra-hydrating vegetable for summer, but also a tricky ingredient for baking. While a too-dry cake is ~the worst thing in the world~ unideal, a too-wet cake always seems underbaked.

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