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Food & Drink The Perfect Summer Drink I Didn't Like Until I Moved to France

22:27  12 july  2018
22:27  12 july  2018 Source:   food52.com

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Summer in France equals the South, where the pace slows, the cicadas make a damn racket, and the pastis flows as heavily as the rosé. Lest I lose you to the “ I don’ t like anise drinks ” bandwagon, hear me out: I don’t either. Or rather I didn ’ t until I learned that a positive pastis experience centers just as

Summer season in France equals the South, the place the tempo slows, the cicadas make a rattling racket, and the pastis flows as Lest I lose you to the “ I don’ t like anise drinks ” bandwagon, hear me out: I don’t both. Or quite I didn ’ t till I discovered constructive pastis expertise facilities simply as a lot

Summer in France equals the South, where the pace slows, the cicadas make a damn racket, and the pastis flows as heavily as the rosé.

Lest I lose you to the “I don’t like anise drinks” bandwagon, hear me out: I don’t either. Or rather I didn’t until I learned that a positive pastis experience centers just as much around the emphasis on experience as it does pastis. The first time I tried the drink started out strong in a tiny backstreet in Marseille—the birthplace of pastis—during the height of summer. However, being too timid to ask how to mix it properly, my clumsy addition of too little water made for a hyper-intense/boozy drink that managed to combine the experiences of sucking on a licorice hard candy and taking multiple half-price well shots in quick succession.

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The Perfect Summer Drink I Didn ' t Like Until I Moved to France . The Summer Elixir My Sister Drinks on the Hottest of Days. Just one of many life lessons she taught me .

The Perfect Summer Drink I Didn ' t Like Until I Moved to F by Rebekah Peppler. It's precisely Suze's signature bitterness that belies the drink 's sweet and sunny–looking disposition; the cocktail is not cloying in the least, making it a great pre-dinner drink to get your appetite going, or an amicable

I later learned that the 2:1 water to pastis ratio I landed on had rendered the drink into a proportion the French uncharitably dub “yogurt.” Never again. So, I took a little time off pastis, avoided black licorice, and then returned to Marseille armed with a proper French friend. Over the course of one long, sunny-terraced, anise-tinged, heart-to-heart-laced afternoon we healed all that pastis-related trauma.

Another French Classic, This Way

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Pastis isn’t made to be drunk in a hurry. Even the process of making the drink showcases its languid tendencies. Pour in a tall glass, one part pastis to five parts chilled water; add ice if you’re not a purist; I’m certainly not. Serve with a bowl of salty chips. The process—a conscious watering down—makes it possible to nurse a pastis throughout the better part of an hour without feeling like you’re drinking melted ice tinged with booze. Plenty of time to play a round of pétanque, dig deep into personal histories with a new lover, open another bag of chips, or simply take note of the way the sun moves slowly across an afternoon.

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The Perfect Summer Drink I Didn ' t Like Until I Moved to France . LJH if you moved to Texas where as you may recall it’s HOTTER THAN THE SURFACE OF THE SUN in the summer , you would find yourself drinking all of the water, and sitting in the water, and dreaming water, and maybe even

The Perfect Summer Drink I Didn ' t Like Until I Moved to France . However I try to drink normal water too. The only things I drink , are coffee and water, and the occasional milk.

Yes, the flavor of anise (and licorice and fennel and coriander and plenty of other herbs) is present but when poured in the correct proportions and out of the correct bottles (I’m partial to the French house Henri Bardouin or the—gasp—California Charbay), it lazes across your palate like a lingering French kiss.

a bottle of water on a table: So very French. © Provided by Food52 So very French. So very French. Photo by Joann Pai

If I can’t turn you on to pastis with a little tongue action, I’ll turn you on with chemistry. The main flavors that tend to compile a bottle—star anise, aniseed, licorice, and fennel—contain an aromatic, organic, oily little compound called anethole. It’s soluble (aka, dissolves) in alcohol, but not so much in water.

At 40% to 45% ABV, a bottle of pastis has enough alcohol to dissolve the anethole and render the drink transparent (or slightly yellow depending on the brand). As water is added, the alcohol and water molecules bind together and push the anethole out to form an army of tiny oil droplets that reflect and scatter light, transforming the once clear liquid to a cloudy, elegant haze. This effect is called louche and it is as magical as it sounds (watch it here).

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The Perfect Summer Drink I Didn ' t Like Until I Moved to France . So yeah, this might be a special soap made in an age old way, but the stuff being sold by your local soapmakers is likely a better balance of ingredients, and didn ' t come from another country ;-). #shoplocal https

Perfect for college students over 21. Kaitlin Bray, Senior Social Media Manager: It tastes like an rosé. The Perfect Summer Drink I Didn ' t Like Until I Moved to France .

a glass of water on a table: Out of office. © Provided by Food52 Out of office. Out of office. Photo by Rebekah Peppler

The combined drama of mixing pastis with its insistence that you slow down long enough to savor it is French été in a glass, and with Bastille Day on the horizon, your pastis conversion timing couldn’t be more apt. Even if there is nary a lavender field in sight, throw a bottle on the table along with some glasses, add a ceramic pitcher of cold water and a bucket of ice, and allow summer to trail across your tongue.

Have you tried pastis? Tell us about your experiences with the French apéritif classic below!

a table with wine glasses © Provided by Food52

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This week, there's a serious heat advisory in effect for New York City. The high is a whopping 97 degrees on this very sunny Tuesday in Manhattan — which also happens to be the day Starbucks is bringing back its most iconic fall beverage, the Pumpkin Spice Latte. "It's way too soon!" exclaimed Lorena, 21, as she left Starbucks yesterday around 12:30 p.m. with her Venti iced coffee in hand. It was 86 degrees at the time, and Lorena explained to Refinery29, "I guess I like [Pumpkin Spice Lattes], but I wouldn't buy one now." When pressed about what she thinks is the right time for sipping a PSL, she simply said, "When it's super cold.

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